An introduction

Cigarguide is a website with reviews of cigars from all over the world. Some cigars have been given to me by the blog sponsors, others I have bought or traded or have been gifted to me by friends.

About me: Born in 1972 I started to smoke cigars on a vacation to Singapore and Indonesia december 2005. At Singapore airport we bought some Cohiba Siglo II, Montecristo #4 and Romeo y Julieta tubos #2 which we smoked in Indonesia, every night a cigar and a glass of whisky. I liked that so much that I decided to keep smoking cigars when I got back.

On the way back I maxed out my creditcard at the cigarshop at Singapore airport. Back in The Netherlands I smoked a few cigars a week and noticed different flavor profiles in different cigars. That sparked an interest, before I always thought a cigar was just a cigar, so I started to look for information online and discovered that cigars are just like wine, whisk(e)y, cognac, lots of different flavors depending on the blend, the soil, the tobacco used, the shape and more. Smoking cigars became more than a nice way of spending the evening, it became a passion.

Here I am, a few years later and I visited places I never thought of visiting before I smoked cigars, made lots of new friends both here in The Netherlands as in the United States, Canada, Nicaragua, Honduras, Dominican Republic, Costa Rica, Germany, England, Belgium and Asia. I got to meet a few of the key figures in the industry and have even worked as a cigar sales rep. Who could imagine that the handful of cigars I bought halfway across the world would have such an impact on my life, such a positive impact.

Now as for the reviews, those are my reviews, my thoughts and my opinion and mine alone. Maybe you agree with my opinion, maybe you don’t, it doesn’t matter because every single review on every single thing in the world is an opinion and we all have our opinions. I’m just lucky enough to live in a country where I can voice my opinion, unlike a lot of people even in cigar producing countries. Feel free to comment if you agree or disagree or have any questions, but keep it respectful.

Categories: Misc

Liga Privada Unico Feral Flying Pig

Liga Privada Unico Feral Flying Pig. Ever since the launch of the Flying Pig series, the cigars have been extremely popular. So popular that they became a regular production cigar. It started with the Liga Privada #9 Flying Pig, then the Liga Privada T52 Flying pig and in 2012, Drew Estate released a bigger version. That’s the Liga Privada Unico Feral Flying Pig. A 5⅜x60 version of the Flying Pig with a blend of his own. That’s why it’s part of the Unico series. Unico cigars are Liga Privada blends, tweaks from the #9 and T52 blends but still belong to the Liga Privada family.


Nowadays, almost all Drew Estate blends come out with a flying pig. The three different Undercrowns have Flying Pigs. I reviewed the Undercrown Shade, Sun Grown and Maduro Flying Pigs. But there are Flying Pigs for the Kentucky Fire Cured series and Herrera Esteli blends as well. But there is only one Feral Flying Pig, all the others are much smaller than this Feral Flying Pig. There’s only one illusive Feral Flying Pig Basher, which is a regular Feral Flying Pig with a different ring. That one was released for the wedding of Marvin Samel, one of the Drew Estate founders.

The cigar looks great. The shape is amazing and the pigtail finishes the cigar in style. A thick, oily, toothy, Colorado Maduro colored wrapper with a simple yet clear ring. Just a simple white with light gray backdrop for a dark gray FERAL print. Simple, effective, stylish. On the back of the ring, the Liga Privada logo is printed. There are also a few veins on the backside of the cigar. The cigar feels well constructed. The aroma is medium in strength. Dark wood, sawdust, and some dark chocolate aromas are coming from the cigar.

The cold draw is great. The flavors from the cold draw are raw tobacco and dark chocolate. At first, the mouthfeel is dry. The bitterness of coffee and soil, with some acidity. The coffee gets stronger while the mouthfeel gets a bit creamy. The Nicaraguan pepper shows up too. Once the burn passes the thinner part of the foot, other flavors start to emerge. The coffee and pepper remain, but there are hints of wood, leather, spices, and sweetness as well. After an inch, a metallic flavor shows up with leather and pepper. The flavors then evolve to oak, leather, tobacco, and coffee. And a slight hint of chocolate in the background. After a third, a mild sweet candy flavor is noticeable for a little while. A rare flavor that I never tasted in cigars before. It’s hard to pinpoint what it resembles, but puffy rice candy comes close. That flavor disappears soon though. Halfway it’s back to espresso, leather and some sweetness. The coffee, leather, and pepper remain the same until the end. The sweetness slowly turns into marzipan.

The draw is great. And the smoke is Drew Estate famous. Thick, full, copious amounts. The burn is pretty straight. The light gray ash is quite firm, yet a bit flaky. This is a full-flavored, full-bodied cigar. But balanced, so it’s not overpowering. The smoke time is four hours exactly

Would I buy this cigar again? Yes I will

number92

Categories: 92, Gran Fabrica Drew Estate, Liga Privada, Nicaraguan cigars | Tags: , , , , , , | Leave a comment

CAO Nicaragua Tipitata

CAO Nicaragua Tipitata. CAO started with country-inspired blends before the company founder Cano Ozgener sold the brand to tobacco giant Scandinavian Tobacco Group. And STG is the parent of General Cigars, so CAO is now part of that family. When STG moved CAO from Tennessee to their headquarters in Virginia, some of the staff refused to move and started Crowned Heads. That’s when Rick Rodriguez was promoted by General Cigars to be the blender and face of the CAO brand. And he continued with the country inspired series.

Most cigar smokers have seen, heard about the CAO Brazil, CAO America, CAO Colombia and the CAO Italia. And probably smoked a fair amount as they are very popular. So for the next of the CAO country-inspired blends, Rodriguez went back to the CAO roots: CAO Nicaragua. The cigar utilizes Nicaraguan tobacco from different regions in the filler and binder. But it’s not a Nicaraguan puro. The blend worked better with a wrapper from Jamastran, Honduras. Jamastran borders the Jalapa valley, it’s just on the Honduran side of the border.

The colorado colored wrapper has a nice shine. But it also has some veins. The cigar feels well constructed. The cap is decent. The ring is in accordance to the country inspired series. The same shape, with Nicaraguan blue and white. The details and letters are in gold, with a red CAO logo. The consistency of the rings in the series is good. The aroma is strong. Cedar, barnyard, sheep and hay is what comes to mind.

The cold draw is flawless. Peppery raisins are the flavor that is released from the cold draw. The start is classic. Coffee, leather, some cinnamon-like spices, and pepper. Basic, yet well balanced and nice. This is not a front-loaded cigar that blows you away from the start. Then the flavors change to more of dry leaves, mushroom flavor with leather and grass. There’s also some sweetness, and after a centimeter, there is a cedar flavor as well. The flavors are a bit dusty and musty though. All of a sudden the cigar has a mild gingerbread flavor with more sweetness and some citrus. Halfway I taste some vanilla with cedar and spices. The final third has a minty fresh aftertaste. And nuts, with cedar and pepper.

The ash is white, dense and firm. The smoke is decent in volume and thickness. The draw is great. The burn is straight. This cigar is medium-bodied and medium flavored. The smoke time is two hours and fifteen minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? Nah
number90

Categories: 90, CAO, Nicaraguan cigars, STG Nicaragua | Tags: , , , | Leave a comment

Kafie 1901 Sumatra Robusto

Kafie 1901 Sumatra Robusto. The Kafie 1901 brand was founded by Dr. Gaby Kafie. Dr. Kafie’s roots are lay in Honduras, where he was born. His ancestors moved to Latin America from Europe in 1901, that’s why 1901 is prominent in the name. Dr. Gaby Kafie moved to the United States and became a physician. Yet, his Honduran roots, the family history in tobacco and his love for cigars and coffee brought him back to Honduras. He started his Tabacalera, Tabacalera Kafie. That factory now includes a cellophane making facility, cigar production, and a box factory. It’s Dr. Kafie’s mission to keep the cigar culture and tradition alive in Honduras. With a decreasing number of factories remaining, that’s an important reason for him to promote Honduran cigars worldwide.

In 2015, the brand released the third Kafie 1901 line. That is the Kafie 1901 Sumatra. It followed the Kafie 1901 Don Fernando Maduro and the Kafie 1901 Connecticut. The cigar is made with Nicaraguan and Dominican filler. The binder is grown locally, in Honduras by the Reyes family. The wrapper is Sumatra, but not from the Indonesian island with the same name. Even though the tobacco originated in South East Asia, seeds were brought to Ecuador. And that’s why there’s so many Ecuadorian Sumatra on the market. From the four sizes available,


The cigar is good looking. A Colorado colored wrapper with a thin vein. It feels like velvet. The head is perfect, beautiful round and nice. The burgundy and gold ring is classic and clear. The name is clear, which blend is clear, the ring gives you the information you need. The cigar has a medium-strong aroma. Its a mixture of hay with the inside of a barn after the animals left to graze outside.

The cold draw is great with a spicy raw tobacco flavor. Once lit, the cigar overpowers with strong coffee and spice. There’s slight citrus on the background and in the aftertaste. After a centimeter, the flavors change. The citrus, spice, and pepper remain. The coffee mellows out and is replaced with leather. And there’s a hint of sweetness. Slowly some salt comes in play as well. Halfway the cigar changes to wood with salt, pepper, and licorice. It’s a sudden change. A few puffs later, a little cocoa shows up on the background. After two thirds, the coffee is back. With spice, pepper, and sweetness. The chocolate, wood, and leather are gone. In the final third, the cigar gets a little more pepper but also a slight harshness that doesn’t do the cigar any good.


The draw is fantastic. And the smoke is white and thick. The light-colored ash is nice and firm. This cigar is full-flavored. The body is medium to medium-full. The smoke time is one hour and twenty minutes

Would I buy this cigar again? A fiver would be nice

number90

Categories: 90, Honduran cigars, Kafie, Tabacalera La Union | Tags: , , , | Leave a comment

Dalay Affentanz Affezibel Belicoso

Dalay Affentanz Affezibel Belicoso. Dalay Zigarren is a German cigar shop. It’s located in Saarbrucken. It’s a La Casa del Habano but also a cigar shop with non-Cuban cigars. And they have their own distribution plus lines of cigars. In 2017, two limited edition cigars in the Dalay range showed up. The Dalay Affentanz Affezibel and the Dalay Affentanz Hell. Made in the Dominican Republic, blended by Michael Grossklos Jr. That’s the shade version of the Affentanz. This is the review of the broadleaf Affentanz.

The cigars are made at Tabacalera Zauberberg. The later Dalay limited edition release was also made at that factory. The blend leans on Dominican tobacco for filler and binder. With some Brazilian in the filler as well. The wrapper is American grown Connecticut Broadleaf. And it’s oily, as the cellophane already started to color. Even though the cigars are less than two years old.

The cigar looks great. A rustic looking wrapper yet velvet to the touch. There are a few veins, but it fits the darkness of the leaf. Affentanz means monkey dance in German, and the white ring has an image of banana peels. And a monkey face on the back. The secondary ring says limited edition in German, 2017 and Sauberberg. The cigar feels well constructed. And the aroma is strong, very strong. Dirt, manure, and mud are what comes to mind.

The cold draw is great. The cigar gives a raw tobacco flavor with pepper and sweetness. Once lit, it’s all about spicy coffee. A few puffs later, the leather shows up too. The mouthfeel is quite dry at this stage. There’s also a nice sugar sweetness. The flavors then bounce from grass to leather, spice, sweet, and pepper. All balanced, all smooth but with a pleasant bite. It has character. After a third, it’s dry wood with chocolate. Still with a dry mouthfeel. The flavors remain in the same spectrum, but with a lot of dynamics. Sometimes leather is leading, other times it is a tobacco flavor. Then wood. All with a nice balance. There’s a mild pepper on the background. And the flavors are all nicely toasted. Including the strong chocolate flavor that shows up every now and then. The mouthfeel changes to creamy. In the final third, the pepper picks up a lot.

The draw is great. The burn is razor sharp. The ash is white and has the shape of a stack of dimes. The smoke is good, a nice thick, voluminous white smoke. The cigar is medium bodied, medium-full flavored. The flavors are balanced, rounded and smooth. The smoke time is two hours and fifteen minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? I want a box
number92

Categories: 92, Dalay, Dominican cigars, Tabacalera Zauberberg | Tags: , , , , | Leave a comment

Partagas Salomones – Vintage –

In 2008 Habanos introduced the Partagas Salomones as a La Casa del Habano exclusive cigar. But the cigars were not new. They have been released as special releases before such as in the 1995 humidor. And in the late 1990s and early 2000s, you could buy bundles of these cigars on Cuba. Counterfeits weren’t as rampant as today, factories weren’t as strict as now. So it was possible to have real, good quality cigars with the correct blend outside of the regular production portfolio.

The Partagas Salomones has been a regular production since 2008. But exclusively sold in La Casa del Habano shops worldwide. With an extra LCDH ring of course. Other Partagas Salomones releases were the Salomones Espanola in the 1995 Partagas Espanola humidor. A smaller version, one inch smaller to be precise, was released in the Silo XXI Millennium Humidor from 1999. And the 2000 Partagas 155 Aniversario humidor had the 7¼x57 Partagas Salomones as well. Since the cigar that we are reviewing is from 2000, it’s most likely that it is an overproduction cigar for this humidor that was sold in a bundle.

The cigar looks great. The shape is amazing. The wrapper is Colorado colored, mild oily and only has one thin vein. The old Partagas ring is used. That means the cigar is pre-2002. That’s when the rings changed. The touch is great, the right amount of bounce when we softly squeeze the cigar. And the cigar has this mild grassy and hay aroma that you can only find in vintage cigars.

The cold draw is a bit tight, but that has to do with the shape. The flavor is leather with spice. Quite strong for a vintage cigar. Right from the start, I taste salt and leather. This is the leather that was so typical for Cubans back in the day. There’s also a very mild pepper and some cedar. Leather remains, a nice floral sweetness shines through. Complex, well balanced. The mouthfeel is very creamy. Mild cinnamon is there as well. A few puffs later, there is some toast. After an inch, there’s a faint flavor that comes close to Nutella. Hazelnut and chocolate, but it’s very faint. The dry, aged, leather is the base flavor, the other flavors dance around it. Sometimes it’s cedar, sometimes pepper. Sometimes floral flavors and then the chocolate again. All well balanced like a beautiful ballet performance. Sophisticated is the right way to describe the flavors. After a third, the pepper becomes a bit more prominent. Not that it comes close to being a pepper bomb, it remains subtle. Chocolate becomes stronger too, slowly. In the last third, the sweetness is stronger. Almost like drinking a nice, small sip of sugar water. But still, with the leather and pepper. The sweetness mellows out, the pepper gains some strength. The flavors get a little salty as well.

The draw is great. The light-colored ash is firm. The smoke is good. It’s not a Drew Estate smoke bomb, but the smoke is medium in thickness and volume. The burn is straight. The cigar is medium bodied, medium flavored. Very complex, subtle and sophisticated. Delicate almost. And it shows how good Cuban cigars can be if the tobacco is treated the right way. If the soil is well maintained. If no shortcuts are taken in the fermentation and aging. And when quality control is at a high level. The smoke time is three hours and thirty minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? Buying a rare 19-year-old cigar is impossible

number93

Categories: 93, Cuban cigars, Partagas (Habanos) | Tags: , , , ,

Blanco Above & Beyond Unwilling

Blanco Above & Beyond Unwilling. David Blanco, the CEO of Blanco Cigars, has a background in the military. Just as his father. And that background prompted them to create a cigar for the heroes that sacrificed all. For those that paid the ultimate price. Not just in the armed forces, but also in the civil service. As a former deputy sheriff and Chicago Fire Department paramedic, David Blanco knows first hand about those sacrifices. On top of his civil service, he served close to 30 years in the American Army. Both in active duty, National Guard and Reservist. He served 18 months in the Global War on Terrorism and Operation Enduring Freedom which brought him to Afghanistan. And at the same time, his father was serving in Iraq. Currently, Blanco is still an active jumpmaster for the United States Army Reserve. He joins veterans at World War II memorial jumps over Europe every chance he gets.


The Blanco Above and Beyond cigars honor those heroes. Part of the proceeds of the cigars goes to charities that help families of fallen service members, or survivors of tragedies while serving. And the cigars represent that. When a service member gets killed, the family members get an American flag, neatly folded into a triangle. All for sizes of the Above & Beyond are torpedos so that the head of the cigars can get a triangle-shaped blue ring with white stars. That resembles the American flag that the family members of fallen servicemen and women get. The cigar itself is a rebranded classic from Blanco Cigars, the American Legion cigar. The wrapper comes from Nicaragua. It’s a Rosado Habano wrapper. The binder is Honduran. The fillers come from both Nicaragua and Honduras.


The cigar has a beautiful reddish-brown wrapper. The point of the torpedo is extremely pointy and sharp for a cigar, The black and silver ring has the American flag. The Blanco name is written in the colors of the fire brigade, police and paramedics. Their logos are on the back of the ring as well. There is a text printed as well, probably the pledge of alliance but since we are not American, we don’t know for sure. The cigar feels well constructed. The aroma is strong. Wood, horses and a little ammonia comes to mind. After a third, it’s pepper, toast, spices, sweetness but now with wood as well. The mouthfeel is quite dry.


The cold draw is loose. The pre-draw is a little dry, with nutmeg and slightly wet hay. But those flavors are faint. Once lit, there is a bitter grassy flavor with spices and pepper. Not unpleasant, but quite unrefined. Soon, the cigar gets more balanced and the flavors get more rounded. The nutmeg and spices start to shine through. When some sweetness shows up, the bitterness fades away. After half a centimeter, the cigar has a sweet toasted flavor, with cinnamon and pepper. Halfway the cigar has a salty, licorice flavor with toast, spices, and pepper. The cinnamon-like sweetness returns, with wood, salt, licorice, and toast. The licorice flavor remains strong, with spices, wood, and pepper.


The smoke is thick and plentiful. The draw is good. The burn is a little off but doesn’t have to be corrected. The cigar is medium to medium full-bodied. The flavors are medium-full as well, with enough evolution to keep the cigar interesting all the way. The smoke time is two hours fifteen minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? Yeah, once in a while

number90

Categories: 90, Blanco Cigars, Nicaraguan cigars, Tabacos de Oriente Nicaragua | Tags: , , , , ,

Maria Mancini Edicion Especial Corona

Maria Mancini Edicion Especial Corona. This Honduran brand is owned and distributed by Schuster Cigars from Germany. The 110-year-old company is making cigars in Bunde, Germany. But besides making their own cigars, the company distributes RoMa Craft worldwide and a few brands on their German home market as well, including Debonaire. And they own a few Caribbean made brands, such as Iron Shirt, Maria Mancini, Casa de Torres and more.


Maria Mancini is sold in several countries, and in several blends. This is the Edicion Especial in a corona size. According to the Cigarworld website, it is a Honduran Puro. So the filler, binder, and the sun-grown wrapper all come from Honduras. The 5½x44 corona was introduced in 2004 and has been for sale since. And the price? In Germany, this cigar has a fixed price tag of €4,60, making it a budget cigar.


The cigar looks good. A nice Colorado Maduro colored wrapper, with some slight and thin veins. It is almost leathery looking. The ring is a bit outdated, old fashioned with red, white and gold. It could use an update. The cigar has a nice aroma, quite strong. It smells like leather and forest. The construction feels good. The cap is close to perfect.


The cold draw is good. It has flavors of raw tobacco, spice, and raisin. The first puffs are Cuban coffee. Strong coffee with loads of sweetness. A few puffs later, the cigar has some citrus acidity and the flavor of old leather, still with some sweetness. The first third ends with cedar, leather, soil, and sweetness. The overall flavor is old, not mold but just old. The second third starts out with sweetness, hay, and grass. All of a sudden, there is a strong milk-chocolate flavor. There is a mild nuttiness as well. Halfway pepper shows up. The cigar gets more character with pepper, chocolate, nuts, and leather. These flavors are consistent to the end but are changing in strength along the way. Sometimes the chocolate is clearer, then the nuts, then the pepper.


The draw is great. The silver-colored ash looks good but isn’t firm. The smoke is okay, not bad but also not thick and full. This is a medium-bodied and medium flavored cigar. The burn is straight. The smoke time is two hours.

Would I buy this cigar again? No. It’s an enjoyable cigar for the money, but I rather pay 2 euro more and get something better

number89

Categories: 89, Honduran cigars, Maria Manchini | Tags: , , ,

Rocky Patel LB1 Robusto

Rocky Patel LB1 Robusto. Rocky Patel makes cigars in Honduras and Nicaragua. And even though he started out in Honduras, last few years he focussed on Nicaragua for production. Almost all of the new blends came out of his Tavicusa factory in Esteli. That factory is owned by Rocky Patel and his partner Amilcar Perez. The Honduran production is made at El Paraiso, a factory owned by Plasencia. But Patel has a special relationship, which allows them to use his own methods, his own people and his own standards for his brands. It’s sort of a lease deal.


This Rocky Patel LB1 is made at that El Paraiso factory. And it’s one of the two new blends that were recently released, made in Honduras. It’s quite normal for cigars to have a factory code during the blending process, and for the LB1 Patel decided to keep that factory code as the name. The cigar is made with tobacco from Honduras and Nicaragua in the filler. The binder is also Nicaraguan. The Nicaraguan tobaccos come from Patel’s farm in Esteli. The wrapper is a Habano wrapper from Ecuador.

The cigar is a looker. A very dark yet smooth wrapper. But the foot has been cut by a drunken torcedor. When placed on a table, foot down, it leans like the Tower of Pisa. The wrapper is evenly in color and smooth. The white and copper-colored ring contrasts the darkness well. The ring is quite simple, yet a little too overwhelming. There’s too many lines, stars, shapes so it makes the ring distracting. The barnyard and manure aroma is quite strong.


The cold draw is a bit though. The flavors are leather and pepper, spicy. But it feels a bit like wet leather, making the draw a bit draggy. Once lit, its pepper and cinnamon toast with espresso. The flavors then evolve to a mixture of soil, leather, coffee, sweetness, and a hint of citrus. The cigar is mellow, and the flavors settle for cinnamon toast with a little pepper, sweetness, and grass. Halfway some wood, more soil, and leather show up, but still with the spiced toast and sweetness.


The draw is good. Better than the cold draw. The white smoke is thick and plentiful. The salt and pepper colored ash is quite firm. The cigar is mellow and well balanced. Where the darkness of the wrapper would suggest it’s a strong, full-bodied cigar, it’s actually not. It’s a medium-bodied, medium flavored, balanced and smooth cigar. The smoke time is two hours and thirty minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? Yeah, I think so.

number91

Categories: 91, El Paraiso, Honduran cigars, Rocky Patel | Tags: , , , , ,

ACID Kuba Arte

Drew Estate Acid Kuba Arte. A limited edition Drew Estate Acid to commemorate 20 years of Drew Estate Acid Kuba. And they come packed in pieces of art. Water towers containing 20 cigars and a boveda pack. All the water towers are hand pained by New York based street artists. That is a tribute to the art side that Drew Estate always had, from day one. The company was founded in Brooklyn, and the 5 artists all have roots in that burrough of New York as well. Back in the day, Jonathan Drew was sitting on a rooftop in Brooklyn, and he saw water towers and graffiti. Now he brings it back together.

The cigar is infused. Premium tobaccos have been used though. From a beautiful American grown broadleaf Maduro wrapper to the hearty Nicaraguan fillers. Add am Indonesian binder and you have the blend. Drew Estate uses a unique infusion method, one of the best kept secrets in the industry to turn the cigars into the ACID lines. People love it, or hate it. There is no in-between. They sell like hotcakes, yet a lot of natural cigar smokers look down on the acid lines.


The cigar looks great. A dark, oily wrapper. No visible veins. The cigar is slightly box-pressed. The ring is in graffiti style, and mentions it’s a limited edition. The aroma is strong, once removed from the cellophane you can immediately smell a chemical aroma that is unusual for cigars. It reminded us of toilet cakes, liquid soap and flowers. The cigar looks and feels well constructed. While wetting the cap, before cutting it, the chemical taste is pretty strong.


The cold draw is pretty good. The wrapper leaves a sweet flavor on the lips, the tobacco itself has some pepper. The first puffs are overpowered by the sweetness of the wrapper. The unnatural sweetness. Once the initial shock of the unnatural sweetness is gone, it’s not that bad. Sweetness, with some spices and pepper. A little coffee shows up, and the pepper mellows out. The floral, chemical sweetness is still very dominant. There are hints of dried leaves and leather on the background as well. After a third it’s still sweet, floral sweet, with pepper, leather, and toast on the background. Halfway the sweetness is at a level where it’s actually pleasant, although still a bit too strong. The flavors remain the same, with that dominant sweetness, some pepper, leather and toast.


The draw is fantastic. And the smoke is plentiful, like with the natural premium cigars from the same factory. The light colored ash isn’t very firm. The cigar is medium bodied, yet full flavored although the flavor isn’t very natural.

Would I buy this cigar again? I prefer natural cigars but this wasn’t bad

number90

Categories: 90, ACID, Gran Fabrica Drew Estate, Nicaraguan cigars | Tags: , , , , , ,

Debonaire Maduro First Degree

Debonaire is the brand of Philip Zanghi. Zanghi first made his steps into the cigar industry in the 1990s in a partnership with Rocky Patel. They were both new to the business. With Zanghi’s connection with Indian Motorcycles, they formed Indian Tobac. In a later stage, Patel bought Zanghi’s shares. Zanghi ventured into other parts of the tobacco industry.

But returned to cigars in 2011 with Debonaire. First only with the Habano, but in 2014 he released the Debonaire Maduro too. And now there’s a third blend, Daybreak, with a Connecticut Shade wrapper.

The Debonaire Maduro is made at the De Los Reyes factory on the Dominican Republic. That factory is owned by the Reyes family. The 5th generation Reyes has entered the business, and that says a lot about the long lasting love affair with tobacco. For the filler Dominican and Nicaraguan tobacco is used. The binder is also from the Dominican. The wrapper comes from the USA. It’s a Connecticut Broadleaf Maduro.

The dark wrapper is toothy and rough. It could easily be mistaken for Brazilian Mata Fina by the looks. But the aroma is good and strong. There is a strong earthy smell to the cigar with some pepper. The shape is great and makes the cigar look cute. That little tampered foot eases the rough look on the wrapper. It’s like an ugly kid with a cute outfit that makes it adorable. The construction feels good.


The cold draw is surprisingly good. With that tampered foot, a tighter cold draw was expected. The flavors are very peppery. The first hit is a strong earthy coffee. Once the cigar opens up, the Maduro sweetness shines through too. There’s also a hint of extra dark chocolate. That chocolate is slowly becoming the dominant flavor. The flavors remain practically the same all throughout the cigar. The bigger sizes will probably offer more variety in flavor. The finale brings strong bittersweet chocolate with some wood.

The draw is great. The smoke is thick and full. The color is a bit off-white. The ash is quite dark. The burn was straight until one side hit a big vein. Then it gets crooked and had to be corrected. This is a medium-full flavored and bodied cigar. The smoke time is an hour.

Would I buy this cigar again? Yes, for the occasions where I don’t have a lot of time.

number90

Categories: 90, De Los Reyes, Debonaire, Dominican cigars | Tags: , , , ,

Create a free website or blog at WordPress.com.