An introduction

Cigarguide is a website with reviews of cigars from all over the world. Some cigars have been given to me by the blog sponsors, others I have bought or traded or have been gifted to me by friends.

About me: Born in 1972 I started to smoke cigars on a vacation to Singapore and Indonesia december 2005. At Singapore airport we bought some Cohiba Siglo II, Montecristo #4 and Romeo y Julieta tubos #2 which we smoked in Indonesia, every night a cigar and a glass of whisky. I liked that so much that I decided to keep smoking cigars when I got back.

On the way back I maxed out my creditcard at the cigarshop at Singapore airport. Back in The Netherlands I smoked a few cigars a week and noticed different flavor profiles in different cigars. That sparked an interest, before I always thought a cigar was just a cigar, so I started to look for information online and discovered that cigars are just like wine, whisk(e)y, cognac, lots of different flavors depending on the blend, the soil, the tobacco used, the shape and more. Smoking cigars became more than a nice way of spending the evening, it became a passion.

Here I am, a few years later and I visited places I never thought of visiting before I smoked cigars, made lots of new friends both here in The Netherlands as in the United States, Canada, Nicaragua, Honduras, Dominican Republic, Costa Rica, Germany, England, Belgium and Asia. I got to meet a few of the key figures in the industry and have even worked as a cigar sales rep. Who could imagine that the handful of cigars I bought halfway across the world would have such an impact on my life, such a positive impact.

Now as for the reviews, those are my reviews, my thoughts and my opinion and mine alone. Maybe you agree with my opinion, maybe you don’t, it doesn’t matter because every single review on every single thing in the world is an opinion and we all have our opinions. I’m just lucky enough to live in a country where I can voice my opinion, unlike a lot of people even in cigar producing countries. Feel free to comment if you agree or disagree or have any questions, but keep it respectful.

Categories: Misc

HENK Maori La Doña

HENK Maori La Doña. For the last two years, HENK cigars made it to the top 25 of Ministry of Cigars. The Henk Maori Haka was the #4 of 2019 and the HENK Maori Gaudi and Masterpiece made the top 10 of the Top 25 of 2020. There are three more vitolas in the HENK line-up. All limited and rare, but I have them all and reviews will follow.

The HENK Maori La Doña is 6½x50 in size. That’s a little shorter and thicker than a classic Churchill, but that doesn’t stop HENK from saying this is the Churchill of the HENK Maori cigars. All tobacco is aged, or even vintage. It comes from the tobacco library of A.J. Fernandez who also makes the cigars. Didier Houvenaghel of DH Boutique blends is the master blender behind this project. But the final approval is in the hands of HENK owner Heiko Poerz.

HENK cigars always look cool because they don’t have a cigar band. Instead, they have a tattoo that draws inspiration from Maori culture. The small pigtail adds to the aesthetical appeal. The Colorado color of the wrapper is even. The wrapper is from the 2009 crop. The construction feels great. The aroma is medium in strength but balanced and warm. Animal aromas with soil.

The cold draw is great. The flavor in the cold draw is quite dry but has hints of raisin with white pepper. The first puffs are full flavor. Wood, coffee, soil, and spice. Then there is more earthiness with some leather. All well balanced. The tobacco is vintage and that is clearly noticeable. It’s smooth, yet with character. The cigar remains smooth, but now with some nutmeg, cedar, leather, and a little pepper. After a third, there is a slightly toasty flavor with cedar, salt, and herbs. The flavors intensify. Slowly there’s more toast, leather, spice, and white pepper. Even at the beginning of the second third, it is possible to retrohale the cigar. The flavors are subtle yet strong. A little more wood in the final third.

The draw is close to perfect. The light-colored ash is firm. The burn is sharp. The light gray smoke is decent in volume. This cigar is smooth yet flavorful. Extremely balanced, yet without losing character. Full in body and flavor. The smoke time is two hours and twenty minutes.

Would I buy this again? Once in a while. It’s fantastic, but comes with a price tag.

Categories: 93, Henk, Nicaraguan cigars, Tabacalera A.J. Fernandez | Tags: , , , , , | Leave a comment

San Lotano Requiem Habano Gran Toro

San Lotano Requiem Habano Gran Toro. Even though A.J. Fernandez was already blending and producing cigars for years, he was only producing for others. And a lot of his blends were hits on the market. So it was time to release a brand for himself. Drawing inspiration from his family’s past in Cuba, Abdel Fernandez came up with San Lotano. That’s the name of the brand his family had before the revolution. Since the release in 2010, San Lotano has seen many offsprings in different blends, and even in oval sizes.

The San Lotano Reqiuem comes in a Habano, Maduro, and Connecticut version. For this review, we picked the Habano in a 6×60 size. Fernandez names it Gran Toro, others call it a Gordo. But the name doesn’t matter, it is a monster of a cigar. The cigar consists of Nicaraguan and Honduran filler. The binder is Nicaraguan with a Brazilian Habano wrapper. San Lotano is also the name of a farm and a cigar factory in Nicaragua. Both are owned by A.J. Fernandez, but the San Lotano factory isn’t the large factory in Esteli.

This cigar is a monster with its 6×60 size. It feels heavy. And for a Brazilian wrapper, it actually looks good. Often Brazilian tobacco looks a bit rough, but there are only two veins here that attract the eye. And they are not even that thick. The construction is good with a perfect triple cap. The green and beige ring is beautiful, the secondary ring matches the top ring. The cigar has a strong aroma of forest smells, wood, and dark spices.

The cold draw is good with a flavor of wood, spice, and pepper. Once lit it is raw wood with cinnamon toast on the palate. The sweet toast is very nice. There is some leather in the retrohale. Slowly but surely pepper shows up. Black pepper. The cigar has balance, but due to the filler wrapper ratio, it misses a bit of character. Halfway wood gets stronger with a hefty dose of Nicaraguan pepper. This is the kind of pepper that both Nicaragua and A.J. Fernandez are famous for. The sweetness is more powdered sugar now. But there is also a roughness in the back of the throat. Wood gets stronger again with some leather and hazelnut. The final third is all pepper, pepper, and pepper.

The draw is a tad easy. The smoke is thick and there is a good amount of it as well. The ash is white and dense. The burn is straight. This is a cigar that is medium-full in body and flavor. The signature of A.J. on the inside of the ring is a nice touch. The smoke time is two hours.

Would I buy this cigar again? In a smaller vitola yes, in this 60 ring gauge no.

Categories: 90, Nicaraguan cigars, San Lotano, Tabacalera A.J. Fernandez | Tags: , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

EPC Pledge Prequel

EPC Pledge Prequel. A little over a year ago, a new cigar from Ernesto Perez Carrillo hit the market. The EPC Pledge. It is part of the Perez-Carrillo series, a series where the generations before Ernesto Perez Carrillo jr are honored. The other cigars in the series are the critically acclaimed Encore and La Historia. “With each sample of the six different blends for Pledge I worked on, I asked myself, ‘Is this cigar worthy to follow La Historia and Encore?” said Perez-Carrillo in a press release. “And I was very pleased when I found the one.”

The cigar comes from Perez-Carrillo’s factory in the Dominican Republic, La Alianza. For the blend, the cigar industry legend uses a Connecticut-grown Habano wrapper over an Ecuadorian binder. The filler is all Nicaraguan. For now, there are only two vitolas available. Those are the Prequel, a 5×50 Robusto, and the 6×52 Sojourn. The prequel became the #1 cigar of Cigar Aficionado’s Top 25 of 2020.

Let’s start with the box, deep blue with a beautiful tattoo style print. But when you open the box up is when the magic happens. The cigars, one row of ten pieces, lay on blue fabric, creating a very luxurious presentation. The cigars come in cellophane with a ‘cigar aficionado cigar of the year 2020, rated 98’ sticker on the foot. The foot ring is gold color fabric. Then there are two blue rings. The top one has different types of blue, with gold and white while the secondary ring mentions Perez Carrillo in clear white letters. Just in looks and packaging, this cigar looks great. The wrapper is oily, and Colorado Maduro in color. The oil gives it a shine like it’s lacquered. The cigar itself is a soft box-pressed with a fairly round head. It is leathery to the touch, but without noticeable plugs. The aroma is strong. Chocolate, barnyard, and the smell of horses.

The cold draw is fine. There is a mild spicy hay flavor with cinnamon. The first puffs are leathery and earthy. Those flavors remain for a while, but with some dark roast coffee and dark chocolate as supporting flavors. The chocolate turns more into cocoa, with a dry mouthfeel. And it gets stronger as well. There is an earthy flavor in the retrohale. Slowly some spice and pepper show up as well. The cocoa remains with some toast and a little bit of natural sweetness. The flavors so far would pair well with a dark stout, such as Guinness. Halfway the cigar gets too strong to retrohale pleasantly. There is still cocoa, pepper is growing and there is some acidity. The flavors are mild creamy. There is also some cedar and a spicy flavor that comes close to smoked paprika. There is a caramel-like sweetness in the aftertaste with a strong pepper, almost like chili padi, or bird’s eye chili as it’s called in the United States. But the chili isn’t overpowering, the rest of the flavors, especially the cocoa and earthiness keep it in check. There is a mild peanut flavor as well. A little more sweetness and acidity, with creaminess. Cocoa is the dominant flavor from start to finish. The peanut flavor gains some strength. The end is that earthiness again, with cocoa, peanuts, and green herbs.

The draw is great. And the natural oils in the wrapper make this cigar very smoky. Thick white smoke. The burn is straight. The ash is medium in color. It isn’t very firm, this isn’t a cigar for a long ash contest. This cigar is full in both body and flavor, with an intense start. The palate is quite unusual and you can taste that this cigar is made with well-aged tobacco. The smoke time is two hours and forty-five minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? Yes. Honestly, I am not the biggest fan of EPC cigars, but this one is very enjoyable.

Categories: Dominican cigars, 92, Tabacalera La Alianza, EPC | Tags: , , , , , | Leave a comment

ADVentura The Royal Return King’s Gold Robusto

ADVentura The Royal Return King’s Gold Robusto, a cigar from ADV & McKay Cigars. ADV & McKay Cigars are Henderson Ventura and Marcel Knobel. They came up with a beautiful story of an adventurer, ADVentura, and his companion McKay who set sail to the new world in 1490. And with every release, another chapter of that story is written. The Royal Return is the 4th chapter.

The Royal Return is available in two blends, Queen’s Pearls, and King’s Gold. The King’s Gold comes in a Robusto and a Toro, this is a review of the 5×52 Robusto. It is made with a Connecticut Broadleaf wrapper from the United States. The binder comes from San Andres, Mexico. And the filler comes from the United States, Nicaragua, and the Dominican Republic. Tabacalera William Ventura is responsible for making the cigars. ADVentura is also a sponsor of the Project Piece of Heart charity.

The thick and dark Connecticut Broadleaf wrapper is oily, greasy almost. The backside is beautifully marbled due to a thin, but visible vein. The band is not a paper band but a metal alloy. It is rare, but not unique. The Norwegian brand Viking and Chinook Cellars Terroir use something similar. But it is rare, and it looks great. It’s like an old, weathered seal including patina. The construction feels good with a pretty flat head. The aroma is strong, wood and spices. It’s like walking on a souk, past one of those spice stalls.

The cold draw is fine. It leaves both a salty and a sweet flavor on the lips, with spice on the tongue. After lighting there is a bitter and salty taste, burned nuts. But that is gone after three puffs, leaving a nice muddy clay flavor with pepper behind. It’s quite a spicy start. But then it mellows out, the spices and pepper are still there, with coffee and caramel. But much milder, calmer. Like when you enter the safe and calm harbor during a storm. The mouthfeel is even a little creamy. The clay flavor is quite unique. At the end of the first third, the sweetness turns to honey. The second third starts with wood and spices. There are also some nuts. Halfway the flavors are sweet wood with spices and cream. Very interesting, smooth, and completely in balance. The final third sees the return of soil, with wood and lingering pepper. The cigar feels hot in the last third.

The draw is fine. The smoke is thick and plentiful. The burn had to be corrected once or twice, but that was no surprise with such a thick and oily wrapper. The thickness of the wrapper also makes it a slow-burning cigar, it lasts long. The ash is white as snow. This cigar has balance and plenty of evolution. The smoke time is two hours and forty-five minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? It is quite interesting so yes, and I want to explore more ADVentura

Categories: 92, ADVentura, Dominican cigars, Tabacalera William Ventura | Tags: , , , | Leave a comment

Fonseca Delicias 2014

Fonseca Delicias 2014. A review of the same blend and size as our review recently. But from a different vintage. And the reason for this is a conversation with a fellow cigar enthusiast about the aging of cigars. Our conversation partner says that the Fonseca Delicias get stronger with age, unlike any other cigar. That’s worthy of a test. So last Friday’s review was a young cigar from 2019. The review of today’s Fonseca Delicias is a cigar with a production date of 2014.

Thanks to La Casa del Habano Kuala Lumpur we were able to get one Fonseca Delicias from 2014 and once from 2019. The Fonseca Delicias is a pre-1960 vitola, but it’s only a premium handmade cigar since 2002. Before it was a machine-made petit corona. The cigar measures 4 ⅞x40. Unfortunately, we do not have the box code, so we can’t say from which factory or which month this cigar came. We only know it’s a cigar from 2014.

What goes for the 2019 version goes for the 2014 version as well. The cigar is not visible due to the white wax paper. The ring is on the outside of the paper, so once you remove the paper it is a naked cigar. Compared to the sample from last Friday, this wrapper has more veins. The color is also a little dull. But the construction feels better. The aroma is mild, with a bit of an old, dry wood smell.

The cold draw is fine, with a nice dose of pepper. After lighting there is a hint of coffee but the main flavor is honey. There is a hint of wood and some white pepper. The sweetness continues to be dominant, but in the background, there’s wood, spices, and leather. There is a bit more pepper in the flavor profile than in the younger version. After a third, there is a wood flavor with sweetness. But it is a bit dry and dusty. There is also a hint of pepper. There is less balance but more character than in the younger version of this cigar. It is still a sweet cigar, but not as overly sweet. The sweetness is no longer honey, but more sugar syrup. In the retrohale, there are a few green herbs. There is a hint of vanilla. Some citrus shows up as well. The wood and leather return, but the sweetness remains the base of this cigar. Near the end, there is leather, pepper, and marzipan sweetness.

The draw is fine. The smoke is good. The ash is light in color and firm. The burn is great. The cigar is medium in body and flavor. It is slightly stronger than the younger Fonseca Delicias, but it remains a medium cigar at most. There is definitely more character in the older version. The smoke time is an hour and thirty minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? Yes, they are cheap and pleasant.

Categories: 90, Cuban cigars, Fonseca (Habanos) | Tags: , , , ,

Fonseca Delicias 2019

Fonseca Delicias 2019. Not too long ago, Ministry of Cigars was talking to a fellow cigar enthusiast about the aging of cigars. And how some cigars age well, others don’t. That some blends are great for aging, and others aren’t. One thing that came up was that aging mellows cigars over the years. Our conversation partner said that only with the Fonseca Delicias he feels it’s different. That these cigars are stronger with a few years of age. This sounds intriguing, so we are putting it to the test.

Thanks to La Casa del Habano Kuala Lumpur we were able to get one Fonseca Delicias from 2014 and once from 2019. The Fonseca Delicias is a pre-1960 vitola, but it’s only a premium handmade cigar since 2002. Before it was a machine-made petit corona. The cigar measures 4 ⅞x40. Unfortunately, we do not have the box code, so we can’t say from which factory or which month this cigar came. We only know it’s a cigar from 2019.

At first, you can’t see the cigar because of the wax paper. This is the only Cuban marca that comes in was paper. And even one of the sizes of the Nicaraguan Fonseca by My Father Cigars comes in wax paper as a tribute to the Cuban version. The ring is red, golden, and white. Classic in style and shape. The ring is around the wax paper so once it’s removed, the cigar is naked. The wrapper is quite dark for a Cuban cigar. There are a few veins, but nothing thick or ugly. The cigar feels a bit hard. There is an earthy smell to the cigar with a little bit of ammonia.

The cold draw is tight. With a bit of a dark spice flavor. Once lit the draw is fine. There is a leathery coffee flavor with some cloves. The flavor then turns to mud, with a thick mouthfeel and a bit of sweetness. The sweetness is enhanced in the retrohale. A little pepper shows up in the same retrohale. The sweetness is mild, yet still the strongest flavor. The cigar is a bit creamy. The sweetness is still there halfway with some pepper and spice. Vanilla and pepper take over, with a hint of wood. The evolution is subtle. In the end, the cigar gains a bit more pepper, more strength, and there is even a nutty flavor.

The draw is fine. But the silver-gray ash isn’t very firm. The cigar is mild and smooth. Quite sweet. An early morning cigar. Not a cigar to blow your mind, but pleasant. It fits the price range. The smoke is fine. The burn is great, nothing to complain about. The cigar is mild to medium in body. The flavor is medium. The smoke time is one hour and thirty-five minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? It’s a great cigar to start the day

Categories: 90, Cuban cigars, Fonseca (Habanos) | Tags: , , ,

Stallone Alazán Corojo Robusto

Stallone Alazán Corojo Robusto. Up until a few months ago, Stallone Cigars was a company we never heard of. But then they hired Todd Vance as Vice President of Sales. And we got some samples of which we reviewed the Castano San Andres Robusto two months ago. Today we review the Alazan Corojo. Both are named after stallions, the big inspiration behind the brand. Owner Tony Barrios is a prize-winning rodeo cowboy.

The cigars come from Las Villas Cigars, previously known as Tabacalera La Perla. It is a small factory in Esteli, Nicaragua. The Stallone Alazán Corojo Robusto is a 5×54 box-pressed Robusto. It is made with a Brazilian Corojo wrapper. The binder comes from Ecuador with Nicaraguan filler.

The wrapper of this box-pressed cigar is beautiful. A nice reddish glow on the smooth and oily wrapper. There is a clean triple cap. The tiny veins are minor and do not take anything away from the aesthetics of the cigar. The ring is pretty. Gray with a stallion and metallic outlines and name. The secondary band has the same colors with the line name in red. The construction feels good. The aroma of the cigar fits with the theme, horses.

The cold draw is fantastic. It gives a herbal flavor. Once lit there is leather and coffee. It then changes to coffee with dark spices. The mouthfeel is a bit dry. The flavor then changes to cedar with spices and herbs. At the end of the first third, there is some pepper and sweetness as well. The second third starts with pepper, dark spices, leather, and soil. It slowly evolves to wood, grass, pepper, spices, and leather. Pepper is growing, black pepper. The mouthfeel stays dry, with a bit of a rough edge. But not unpleasant rough. Wood is getting stronger. The final third has way more pepper and an unusual mushroom flavor. The finale has wood, herbs, pepper, and mushroom.

The draw is great. The ash is light in color, dense, and firm. The burn is good. The smoke is thick, plenty in volume, and white as can be. There is a good balance. This cigar is medium to full in strength, medium in flavor. With Brazilian tobacco, there was an expectation of more sweetness. And with Corojo, there was an expectation of nuts. But those flavors weren’t really there. The smoke time is two hours and a half.

Would I buy this cigar again? Yes, I like it.

Categories: 90, Nicaraguan cigars, Stallone, Tabacalera La Perla | Tags: , , , ,

Sobremesa Brulee Blue

Sobremesa Brulee Blue. A Corona Gorda with a Connecticut Shade wrapper from Dunbarton Tobacco & Trust. According to Steve Saka, this is a cigar for the cigar geeks. And that intrigues the cigar geeks in me. The cigars are limited in production, only 13.000 cigars, and only available in the United States. It is a tweaked version of the Sobremesa Brûlée regular production blend.

Two years ago, Dunbarton came out with the Sobremesa Brûlée. Quite a shock for the fans of Steve Saka, as he is known for bold yet balanced blends. But as he said back then “Sobremesa Brûlée is a recreation of the milder, shade-wrapped ligas of my early years. Somewhere over the last three decades, many of the classic shade cigars have become wispy, uninspiring, and rather dull to my palate. I wanted to share with others the way I remember these blonde cigars being,”. And the line is a success. Let’s see how this Sobremesa Brulee Blue is.

The cigar looks good. A light-colored wrapper, but not pale as many other Connecticut Shade wrappers. You can see it’s a delicate wrapper with some slight veins. The pigtail is always a nice touch. The ring is a piece of art, it looks very simple but it has a lot of details. The original ring won an international award. This version has a beautiful baby blue color added. The construction feels good. The medium-strong aroma has hints of sawdust.

The cold draw is very sweet. This is probably where the “sweetened wrapper or not” debate comes from. The airflow is perfect though. The first puffs are spicy and sweet. The spice feels a bit like tongue bite when you smoke pipe tobacco too fast. There’s also some toast. The mouthfeel is creamy and smooth. There a slight wood flavor as well. It’s subtle though, like everything on this cigar. Steve Saka’s goal was to blend a cigar to mimic the old school Connecticut cigars. He succeeded. In the second part, there is some marzipan sweetness. The pepper picks up. The finale is spicy and woody.

The construction is great. The draw is fabulous. The gray smoke is quite full. The light gray ash isn’t very firm. The burn is sharp. The cigar is mild in body, but medium in flavor. The smoke time is one hour and forty minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? I am a fan of Steve Saka’s cigars but not of Connecticut Shade. I’ll get something else from Dunbarton instead.

Categories: 91, Fabrica de Tabacos Joya de Nicaragua, Nicaraguan cigars, Sobremesa | Tags: , , , , , , ,

Don Kiki Brown Label Figurado

Don Kiki Brown Label Figurado. For those that are unaware of who Don Kiki is, read the article on Industry Legends: Don Kiki Berger on Ministry of Cigars. It is a story about a second-generation Polish Cuban who came to America and built a retail empire in Miami. But also became a cigar manufacturer and a tobacco grower in Nicaragua. Unfortunately, Enrique ‘Don Kiki’ Berger is no longer with us but his widow Karen Berger continues to dominate the Miami retail scene and runs the cigar imperium. With Don Kiki cigars, but also her K by Karen Berger line.

This Don Kiki Brown Label Perfecto is a small, funny-looking Figurado. Almost a Perfecto size, but with a semi-box press and not exactly a perfecto shape. Thus figurado is the perfect name. As for the term figurado, all non parejo shaped cigars are figurados. So every torpedo, perfecto, pyramid, etc is a figurado. And this specific one is a Nicaraguan puro. But all the tobacco comes from Cuban seed. Some of the tobacco comes from the farm located right next to the factory Tabacalera Esteli in Esteli.

This is a cute-looking cigar. A nicely figurado shape. Very thin at the head and then a perfecto shape at the foot. The head is flat, and the wrapper looks a bit lighter at the foot. The cigar is partially round and partially box-pressed. The Colorado Maduro color of the wrapper is good. The ring is very dark brown, almost black. There is also a Don Kiki Black Label line, but the Brown Label has golden letters, where the black label uses silver. So that makes the lines easy to differentiate. The unique shape makes this cigar score high on looks. The aroma isn’t very strong. It is a stable aroma.

The cold draw is fine and leaves a citrus flavor on the lips. Almost sparkling, like Sprite. After lighting there is a lemony sweetness with coffee, earth, and leather. There is a hint of vanilla in the retrohale. The cigar remains fresh with that lemon-like acidity and a nice sweetness. There is also some dark spice and some leather. Suddenly, below the sweet and sour lime, there is a hint of walnuts. The balance between sweetness and citrus is perfect. Add the walnuts and some black pepper and this cigar exceed expectations. The second third starts with that sweetness, leather, citrus, and baking spices. The baking spices are stronger in the retrohale. Slowly the cigar gets a bit more of a leather and leaves flavor. There are subtle changes in the flavor, but it all remains smooth and mellow. In the last part, there is more of a nutty flavor. The lemon and sweetness tone down a lot. Leather returns. The final puffs have a nice dose of pepper and a hint of wood.

The draw is great, especially for such a hard vitola to roll. The stack of dimes ash is great to look at. It’s salt and pepper in color. The smoke is good in both volume and thickness. The burn is straight and slow. This is a medium body and medium flavor cigar. Smooth, subtle, and delicious. The smoke time is two hours and fifteen minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? It’s delicious and cheap so the answer can only be ‘hell yeah’

Categories: 91, Don Kiki, Nicaraguan cigars, Tabacalera Esteli | Tags: , , , ,

Condega Serie S Masaya Epicure

Condega Serie S Masaya Epicure. Condega is a Nicaraguan cigar brand from Aganorsa Leaf. Although the international distribution rights are with the Spanish company Gesinta. And they are expanding the brand at a rapid rate. Just a few weeks ago, a new limited edition was announced. Just like the previous Condega Serie S limited, it is a tribute to a Nicaraguan volcano. This time to the Masaya volcano.

As this is a tribute to the volcanic soil of Nicaragua, it is only fitting that it is a 100% Nicaraguan cigar. Only Nicaraguan grown Corojo and Criollo 98 is used. All grown by Aganorsa Leaf.

The cigar looks great. The cardboard tube looks great and an impressive cigar is inside. A smooth, oily, dark wrapper. A black and golden ring, bright and shiny. A flat pigtail and a closed foot. This is a looker. The cigar feels well constructed. The aroma is strong. It smells like sawdust from dark wood.

The cold draw is good. Pepper and raisin are hitting the palate. The cigar opens strong. Pepper, dark spices, cedar, and sweetness. It mellows out soon, with some leather and earthiness. The sweetness is getting a tad stronger. The second third still has sweetness and cedar, but more dark spices and some toast. The flavors are balanced. The spices shine best in the retrohale. The flavors continue into the third part. The mouthfeel is dry. The wood is getting a little stronger.

The draw is great. The cigar gives a good about of smoke. The light gray ash is firm. And the burn is straight. This is a medium full cigar, full of flavor. The smoke time is two and a half hours.

Would I buy this cigar again? Yes

Categories: 91, Condega, Nicaraguan cigars, TABSA | Tags: , ,

Blog at WordPress.com.