Monthly Archives: January 2017

Cigar of the month January

Over the last month I reviewed 9 cigars with my new 100 point rating system and the cigar of the month january is:

Cornelius & Anthony Cornelius Toro with a 94! score

I’ve been rating cigars with my 100 point rating system for a month and I must admit that I was worried it wouldn’t work after my first two cigars because both rated high in the 90 but then the third cigar proved that my rating system is spot on for me. Ofcourse its new to me so it needs a little fine tuning but overall I can say that it works quite well and I’m happy I changed to this 100 point system.

Now as for the complete list of cigars I smoked in January for Cigarguideblog:
1) Cornelius & Anthony Cornelius Toro (USA) 94 points
2) Sobremesa Short Churchill (Nicaragua) 93 points
3) Padron 1926 #1 Double Corona (Nicaragua) 91 points
4) Nicoya Medios Robusto (Nicaragua) 91 points
5) Splendid Robusto (Dominican Republic) 91 points
6) Cain F Lancero (Nicaragua) 90 points
7) Paradiso (San Cristobal) Quintessence Epicure (Nicaragua) 90 points
8) Santiago Maduro Robusto (Nicaragua) 90 points
9) Joya Black Robusto (Nicaragua) 89 points

El Titan de Bronze made a great cigar for Cornelius & Anthony and Sandy Cobas and her team live up to the reputation they earned over the years as top quality cigar manufacturers.

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Categories: Cigar of the month | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Padron 1926 #1

If you have read my reviews the past month you may have noticed that all of them, except for the limited edition Cain F Lancero, are all releases from the latest IPCPR or Intertabac trade shows so you might think that I only like to smoke the new stuff, be hip and fast but let me assure you, i’m not. It just happens that I’ve gotten the cigars at Intertabac and put them all aside in one box, my “to review” box. And yes, when I grab something else to review from my collection I often think “what lesser known cigar would my readers like to read?”. So yes, I am a curious human being with a passion for cigars so I love to try new stuff, but I also love the classics and the neo classics. Today, when I noticed the list of new cigars I reviewed and was browsing through my humidor, I realized myself why I started this blog approximately 10 years ago. I was quite new to cigars back then and was trying out all different cigars I could find, just to explore the world of cigars. Little did I know that 10 years later I’m still exploring and only scratched the surface, but that aside. I wrote down weather I liked a cigar or not, but knowing myself and knowing I would lose those notes I decided to store them online for easy access and with automatic backups, and if you do that, why not make them public? But basically I started the blog for myself. So why not smoke a classic, a cigar that you can find many reviews off, and review it for myself? I picked the Padron 1926 #1 Maduro, a 6 3/4×54 Double Corona with a maduro wrapper around Nicaraguan tobacco.


Now Padron, I don’t think they need any introduction. I think that they are the highest rarest Nicaraguan cigar manufacturer, the Nicaraguan Cohiba or Opus X, the flagship of the whole country and the 1926 and 1964, named after the birth year of Padron founder Jose and the year he started Padron Cigars, are the most praised lines with a huge reputation. I have smoked them and always loved them, even reviewed some but never this 1926 #1.


The cigar has an added band, specific ring tells me it was distributed in The Netherlands and is at least a few years old. It’s the Dutch tax band that got replaced by a new system a few years back so the cigar has had a minimum of three years of aging on tip of the minimum of five years the tobacco aged before the tobacco was used for rolling the cigar. It also tells me that back then the cigar had a price tag of 22 euro. The wrapper is dark, rough with some veins and is leathery to the touch. The construction feels good and the cold draw is a bit loose. The band, which are actually two bands, are beautiful, no corners are cut on the quality there and classic classy. A deep and rich barnyard aroma is what I smell from the cigar.


I taste a lot of coffee with red pepper. Soon I also taste a little sugar and the pepper mellows out. After an inch the cigar slowly changed to earthy with a little pepper. After a third I also taste a little citrus acidity while the pepper is just lurking on the aftertaste. During puffing i taste a sugary sweetness. A little before halfway I taste a sweet woody flavor with spice and pepper. Halfway I get the earthy flavor again and the pepper is getting more prominent again.


The draw is a little loose due to a ripped wrapper close to the head of the cigar which got fixed by removing the complete triple cap, that fixed the draw. The smoke is thick, white and there is plenty to go around. The burn is reasonably sharp. The ash is white, dense and firm. This is a full flavored full bodied cigar but with a great body flavor ratio and a nice evolution. The smoke time was around an hour and 40 minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? Yes, and I think that every cigar aficionado should have a few of this in his or her humidor.

Score: 91

91

Categories: 91, Cubanica, Nicaraguan cigars, Padron | Tags: , , , , | 1 Comment

Splendid Robusto

A few years ago my friend Kolja introduced me to Jesper Petersen during a dinner hosted by Rocky Patel. At the time I was working for the Dutch Rocky Patel importer/distributer while Jesper is the Danish importer/distributer for a handful of brands including Rocky Patel. He started his distributing business approximately 7 years ago, after doing cigar events in restaurants and bars for a few years. And now Jesper decided to bring his own brand to the market, first in Denmark, then Germany and slowly take over Europe in true viking style.

The brand is named Splendid after his company and there are two vitola’s, a 4.75×54 Robusto Grande and a 5×52 Torpedo. Today I’m smoking the Robusto Grande that Jesper gave me at the Intertabac trade show in Dortmund last september. The sample I got came without a band but on Jesper’s Facebook page I saw pictures of the bands so I could include those in my rating. Jesper told me it took him three years to create this blend of Dominican tobaccos from the Navarette y Mao region and the Cuban seed wrapper from the Los Reyes family to create the smooth medium cubanesque he wanted to introduce to the Danish and European market. The expected retail price of the cigars will be between 9 and 10 euro per stick.


The wrapper looks great, dark and oily without big veins. The head is well rolled and quite flat so this is the perfect cigar to be punched. There is a strong hay aroma coming from the cigar. The construction feels good, no soft spots or plugs, all evenly packed. The cold draw is a little on the loose side and except for a very mild pepper on the tip of my tongue I don’t taste much.


You have read this before but I grabbed my trusted vintage Ronson, older than both me and Jesper and probably still in a better shape, to light this cigar. It’s easy to light the cigar and I taste a very nice and full coffee flavor with a hint of red pepper. After half an inch I taste a dark wood with a little pepper. The cigar gets a little spicier too with walnuts on the background, very mild though.


After a third the walnut flavor is growing stronger, well matched with the equally strong wood and a little pepper. Halfway walnut is the dominant flavor. After two thirds I taste a strong citrus with the nuts, overpowering the nuts a little.


The smoke is thick and luscious and white as can be. The ash is also very light colored and quite firm. The burn is good and the draw is better than during the cold draw. This cigar is medium plus bodied and full flavored. The smoke time was little over 90 minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? Yes, this is a very nice smoke

Score: 91

91

Categories: 91, Dominican cigars, Splendid, Tabacalera Palma | Tags: , , , , , | 2 Comments

Santiago Maduro Robusto

Santiago Cigars is a new brand from Nicaragua and I met the owners at the largest tobacco trade show in the world, intertabac in Dortmund, last September. Online there is not a lot of information about the brand, just that it’s named after the first capitol of Nicaragua and that the cigar is made by the Plasencia family. Now that last piece of information is interesting for the cigar geeks among us that know the Plasencia’s and recognize their importance in the cigar industry. They are amongst the largest tobacco growers and cigar producers in both Nicaragua and Honduras, they make cigars for a lot of brands like several Alec Bradley lines, Casa Magna for the Quesada family and many more next to a few lines for themselves and in Honduras they have a joined operation with Rocky Patel. That’s just the cigars they produce but their tobacco is sold to almost everybody. That’s how important the Plasencia family is and why my friend Jonathan Drew calls them ‘the octopus’ in an endearing way. And even though they are so important it’s still a humble and down to earth family who does a lot of charity for the less fortunate.


Now about the cigar, it’s a 5×50 box pressed robusto with a double band. The wrapper is a San Andres Maduro from Mexico with a Nicaraguan binder and filler tobacco from both Mexico and Nicaragua. The ring is nice and detailed but the 2nd ring is so off color with the regular band, the red just isn’t a match and I would never have picked that color scheme. The wrapper is beautiful though and the cigar is beautifully made with a well rounded top. The construction feels good and the cigar has a mild barnyard aroma. I decided to punch the cigar instead of cutting it. The cold draw is great with a mild pepper and raisin flavor.


I used my trusted vintage Ronson lighter to light this cigar and due to the thick leave it takes some effort. First hit is sour but it disappears right away. After that it’s a mixture of coffee, lime and wood, a quite unique flavor combination. After a centimeter it turns into a charred wood flavor with a mild citrus aftertaste. After an inch the charred part disappears, it’s now wood with a citrus that’s growing stronger.


After a third it’s a mild barbecue with wood and citrus. Halfway the smoky barbecue is gone and replaced with sweetness. After two thirds I notice some spice slowly growing with some wood, the aftertaste is mildly sweet and the citrus is almost complete gone. The wood is getting stronger too.


The smoke is thick, white and plentiful and again my air cleaner is working overtime. The draw is great. The ash is salt & pepper colored with beautiful rings and quite firm. The burn is beautiful, slow and straight. This cigar is full bodied, full flavored with a nice evolution. The smoke time was about 75 minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? Yes I’d like to give it another try but I won’t buy a box.

Score: 90
90

 

Categories: 90, Nicaraguan cigars, Santiago | Tags: , , , , , , | 3 Comments

Nicoya Medios Robusto

At the intertabac trade show in Dortmund Germany back in 2015 I met an Australian gentleman by the name of Gerard Hayes while hanging out at the A.J. Fernandez booth and almost a year later I see both names pop up again, this time with Gerard’s name as brand owner of the new brand Nicoya and A.J. Fernandez as his manufacturer. It turned out that Gerard had founded this new brand, and as far as I know the only Australian cigar brand, even though the name Nicoya pays tribute to the Nicaraguan people who use it as slang to refer to their origin although other sources say the word Nicoya refers to the peninsula in Costa Rica that once belonged to Nicaragua and that the Nicaraguan people use the word Nicoya for land and territory that was stolen from them. Now, even though I visited Nicaragua twice and love the country I don’t know enough about the culture, the people and the history to tell which explanation is the right one, so you decide for yourself ok?


Nicoya is quite simple in setup, just two blends, the medium bodied medios (also referred to as Nicoya Red) and the fuerte aka Nicoya Purple and both just in one size, a 5×52 robusto. I met up with Gerard again at his booth at intertabac 2016 and had the pleasure to smoke both cigars. I was looking forward to that since A.J. Fernandez makes some of my favorite cigars and the cigars didn’t disappoint. Luckily Gerard gave me an extra set of cigars so I can do this review. Unfortunately I can’t show pictures of the boxes but they were so classy I wouldn’t mind making a table out of empty Nicoya boxes.


The Nicoya Medios robusto that I’m smoking now for this review is made with an Ecuadorean Habano Rosado wrapper, a Mexican binder and fillers from Jalapa, Esteli, Ometepe and some Dominican Habano 2000. The cigar has a nice, simple yet tasteful band, silver and red and the back of the bands are like wings, which is a nice detail. The wrapper is a little dull, but not in a way I would pass it in a humidor. The veins are thin and the head of the cigar is a bit bumpy. The construction feels good, evenly filled everywhere. The aroma is very pleasant, deep and rich, earthy and like being close to a horse. I punched the cigar, the cold draw is just fine and leaves a spicy flavor on my tongue with some raisin.


I grabbed my vintage Ronson again to light this cigar, my favorite way to light a cigar inside (outside a jet flame is a better choice). Lighting is a breeze, and I taste a nice medium coffee flavor. The coffee is getting stronger with a little citrus. The flavors are quite sharp. After a centimeter i taste wood and a growing citrus.

After a third I also taste some sweetness with the wood and the citrus is almost completely gone. I also taste some mild herbs. The flavors are well balanced. After two thirds I finally taste a little bit of pepper but with a sweetness that makes it very pleasurable combined with the wood.


The ash is white and firm and the draw is flawless. The smoke is reasonably thick and white, I also get a nice amount of smoke from the cigar. The burn is quite straight, not razor sharp but not still not enough to correct. The cigar is medium bodied and full flavored. The smoke time is about an hour and thirty minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? Yes! It’s a great stick, Gerard and Abdel hit a homerun.

Score: 91

91

Categories: 91, Nicaraguan cigars, Nicoya, Tabacalera A.J. Fernandez | Tags: , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Cain F Lancero

The people that know me and my cigar preferences know that I’m a big fan of thinner ringed cigars and that my favorite vitola is probably the lancero. I have a decent selection of lanceros in a dedicated ‘lancero humidor’, an old 50’s refrigerator turned humidor. My collection currently has about 600 (petit) lanceros. Now because it’s a cigar that requires a lot of attention, I don’t smoke it when I have company, I don’t smoke it when I’m watching a game, I don’t smoke it when I’m watching a move, I only smoke them when I really want to focus on the cigar. And maybe because it’s such a hard cigar to smoke, smoke too fast and it gets bitter, smoke to slow and you get to relight it often, it’s not a popular size but boy, do I love them. For me the wrapper filler ratio is the best there is, a lancero or any other thin cigar has so much more dynamic than the large ring gauge sticks that are so popular nowadays. My goal for this year is to review at least one lancero each month and post my findings on the 15h of every month, at the end of the year I will not only make a top 25 but also a top 12 of the lanceros I smoked.

The first lancero I will review this year is the 7×38 Cain F lancero. I had this Nicaraguan puro in my humidor for years, I smoked several in the past and always quite enjoyed them. The Cain F was designed by Studio Tobac, Oliva’s think tank, in the hay day of the strong cigars and it contains a lot of ligero tobacco and the body flavor ratio in the thicker sized was way off because of it. The wrapper has a nice color with three small water spots but I’m not bothered by that. The veins have been rolled flat, like Oliva always does, before the wrapper is applied and that gives a smoother appearance of the cigar, the bands are simple, the regular Cain F foot band with an added skinny Studio Tobac band. The construction feels good and the cigar has a nice yet very faint cedar aroma. The cold draw is flawless with a mild peppery flavor to it.


Since it’s a small cigar there is no way to punch it, so I used my xikar cutter and Ronson lighter to decap and light the cigar. It’s a thin cigar so lighting is quick and easy. Straight from the get go I taste coffee and pepper with soon a little nutmeg. After a centimeter there is also a little sweetness and a mild acidic aftertaste on my tongue. After an inch the cigar loses the coffee and gets spicier with a sharp pepper on the tip of my tongue. Slowly but surely the cigar gets spicier and more peppery. The ligero strength also kicks in. The flavor doesn’t change dramatically but in little nuances every few puffs, just like you can expect from a thin stick. Halfway the strength toned down a little and I taste a lot of pepper with some licorice on the background. After two thirds i also taste sweetness with the pepper and the licorice changed to an earthy flavor.


The smoke is a little thinner than I would like, but still reasonably. The amount of smoke is fine and it’s white. The ash is beautiful, colors range from dark to light gray and it’s firm for such a thin cigar. The burn is razor sharp. This cigar is full full bodied and medium full flavored. Just like it’s bigger brothers the body flavor ratio is off, but not as bad as the thicker versions of the Cain F. I suspect this Cain F line was blended for strength with flavor as a second priority. Now I don’t mind a strong cigar, but it has to be balanced. I didn’t have to relight the cigar and it lasted me for almost two hours.


Would I buy this cigar again? This is a limited edition so that is impossible and I still have plenty.

Score: 90

90

Categories: 90, Cain, Nicaraguan cigars, Tabacalera Oliva | Tags: , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Paradiso Quintessence

About 25 years ago Robbie Levin decided it was time to start his own cigar brand, next to the family tobacco business that already existed for a few generations. So he bought English pipe tobacco brand, Ashton, and made a private label blend with one of his long term cigar suppliers Arturo Fuente and the cigar brand Ashton was born. After more than a very successful decade and a few high praised and good selling cigar lines, all under the Ashton name, all made by Fuente in the Dominican Republic and all ‘old style’ it was time for something new, something that would attract the new generation of cigar enthusiasts, something with a little more edge and so 3 new brands were born. Benchmade, La Aroma de Cuba and San Cristobal, all made in Nicaragua by My Father Cigars. And like all Levin does, they became successful, so successful that we now can choose from a few LADC and San Cristobal blends.


Due to copyright Ashton can’t use the La Aroma de Cuba name outside of the USA, so they changed the name to La Aroma Del Caribe and for San Cristobal, a name that they could use in some markets but not in others, they picked Paradiso. The blends are identical, the labels and boxes are identical just the name on the labels and boxes changed. I used to work for the Dutch distributed of Ashton and had the pleasure of meeting Robbie, his daughter Meera and their vp of sales Chip Goldeen on several occasions and even though there is no professional relationship at the moment I met them at intertabac Chip handed me their latest release for the European market, the Paradiso Quintessence. The cigar is made from Nicaraguan tobacco grown by the Garcia family with an Ecuadorean Habano wrapper. I smoked the 6×52 epicure.


The wrapper is nice, oily and shiny with a few minor veins and the band is top, the recognizable parrots with the gold medals but this time an added name underneath the picture that says ‘quintessence’. The construction feels good but at the left side, right where the ring is, the cigar feels flat, box pressed, but just on one side while the rest of the cigar is round. That will of course effect the final score, but how much will depends if it effects draw, smoke and ash characteristics. The aroma is deep, mild acidic and reminds me a bit of autumn, like fallen leaves without smelling fallen leaves. The cold draw is fine, I taste some pepper on my lips. I used my cigar xi2 cutter to decap the cigar and my Ronson varaflame to light the cigar.


I taste coffee with some spices and a little bit of sweetness. The coffee remains the basic flavor but the spices tone down. The cigar makes my mouth dry. After a third I taste s little more sweetness and a little bit of lime with a little bit of red pepper in the aftertaste. After a third I taste some cinnamon with wood and lime. The lime is purely in the aftertaste though. After two thirds I taste a nice nut flavor, with a little bit of spice. No more lime, no more sweetness. Near the end this cigar is getting spicier and I taste a lot of pepper, especially on my lips. This all on a base of nuts.


The smoke is thick, it’s white and it’s plentiful. The ash is silver gray with black stripes. It’s not too firm. The burn is good, not razor sharp but I don’t have to correct either. The draw is great. This medium full, full flavored cigar have me 100 minutes of smoking pleasure.

Would I buy this cigar again? Yeah, once in a while but I prefer the Paradiso Revelation

Score: 90

90

Categories: 90, My Father Cigars, Nicaraguan cigars, Paradiso - San Cristobal | Tags: , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Joya Black Robusto

Joya de Nicaragua is the oldest factory in Estelí, Nicaragua with a huge history. I’ve been blessed and had the opportunity to visit the factory several times (including a trip for the Cigaragua book by Marcel Langedijk and Jesaja Hutubessy). In 2014 Joya de Nicaragua tried to rejuvenate their look to attract a new group of aficionados with the release of the Joya Red, a cigar with a modern look and feel and it was very well received. The next step is the Joya black, a little stronger version of the Red with a Mexican San Andres Negro wrapper over Nicaraguan fillers and binder with the same sort of artwork as the Joya Red but in black of course. I smoked a few pre-releases at an event in the Netherlands a few months prior to the release at the ipcpr 2016. The 5¼x50 robusto that I’m smoking for this review I got from Juan Martínez at the Intertabac trade show in Dortmund. And to keep it all in theme I’m using my Joya de Nicaragua branded Xikar cutter and my Joya de Nicaragua stinky ashtray painted by Subculture Studios.

Let’s start with the band, that has certainly the look and feel of the successful Joya Red. The band is modern but in a way that also honors the history and the historic artwork of the older Joya de Nicaragua blends. The wrapper is dark and have a few veins, it’s evenly dark. The construction feels good, no soft spots or plugs. The cigar has a distinct aroma, barnyard but with a burned wood finish. The cold draw is good, a little of the tight side of good. I taste some dry dark chocolate.

Since I don’t have a Joya branded lighter I used my trusted vintage Ronson varaflame to light the cigar, which was pretty easy. I taste a bit of a smoky barbecue flavor, not fire cured barbecue but still. There’s also a little sugar like sweetness. The sweetness gets stronger while the barbecue fades away and makes place for a grilled chili pepper flavor.

After a third I taste the sugary sweetness (which is mild and balanced) with some wood and toast. Halfway the wood gets stronger and there is a tangy citrus flavor on my tongue. After two thirds I also taste a minty freshness in the aftertaste. The mild sugar returns near the end too.

The smoke is white, thick and abundant, 100% score on the smoke and it makes my air cleaner work overtime. The burn is good, a little crooked at the start but it corrects itself. The ash is white and quite firm. The draw is better after lighting than in the cold draw. The smoke time is about 90 minutes. I would call this cigar medium plus to full.

Would I buy this cigar again? I think I prefer the Joya Red, especially the half corona which is an amazing cigar.

Score 89

89

Categories: 89, Fabrica de Tabacos Joya de Nicaragua, Joya de Nicaragua, Nicaraguan cigars | Tags: , , , , , , | Leave a comment
 
 

An introduction

Cigarguide is a website with reviews of cigars from all over the world. Some cigars have been given to me by the blog sponsors, others I have bought or traded or have been gifted to me by friends.

About me: Born in 1972 I started to smoke cigars on a vacation to Singapore and Indonesia december 2005. At Singapore airport we bought some Cohiba Siglo II, Montecristo #4 and Romeo y Julieta tubos #2 which we smoked in Indonesia, every night a cigar and a glass of whisky. I liked that so much that I decided to keep smoking cigars when I got back.

On the way back I maxed out my creditcard at the cigarshop at Singapore airport. Back in The Netherlands I smoked a few cigars a week and noticed different flavor profiles in different cigars. That sparked an interest, before I always thought a cigar was just a cigar, so I started to look for information online and discovered that cigars are just like wine, whisk(e)y, cognac, lots of different flavors depending on the blend, the soil, the tobacco used, the shape and more. Smoking cigars became more than a nice way of spending the evening, it became a passion.

Here I am, a few years later and I visited places I never thought of visiting before I smoked cigars, made lots of new friends both here in The Netherlands as in the United States, Canada, Nicaragua, Honduras, Dominican Republic, Costa Rica, Germany, England, Belgium and Asia. I got to meet a few of the key figures in the industry and have even worked as a cigar sales rep. Who could imagine that the handful of cigars I bought halfway across the world would have such an impact on my life, such a positive impact.

Now as for the reviews, those are my reviews, my thoughts and my opinion and mine alone. Maybe you agree with my opinion, maybe you don’t, it doesn’t matter because every single review on every single thing in the world is an opinion and we all have our opinions. I’m just lucky enough to live in a country where I can voice my opinion, unlike a lot of people even in cigar producing countries. Feel free to comment if you agree or disagree or have any questions, but keep it respectful.

Categories: Misc | Leave a comment

Sobremesa Short Churchill

Back in 1996, years before I smoked my first premium cigar (that was a Cuban Cohiba in Indonesia late 2005) Steve Saka started what was most likely the first consumer oriented website on cigars ever. As I mentioned, it was years before I lit my first premium cigar so I missed that Steve started working for JR Cigars as a dedicated consultant for sales, marketing and product development. Actually, the first time I ever heard his name was after he moved to Drew Estate and created the cigar that was a game changer for Drew Estate, Liga Privada no.9, and the follow ups like the T52 and undercrown lines.

After leaving Drew Estate Steve took a hiatus before returning with his own company, Dunbarton Tobacco & Trust and his first line: Sobremesa. This cigar is made by Joya de Nicaragua but the blend is made by Saka and he actually owns the tobacco himself instead of using Joya’s tobacco. I heard and read a lot of the cigar and finally met Steve at intertabac last September. We chatted a bit and he gave me two cigars, his new blend Mi Querida and this 4 3/4 x48 Sobremesa short Churchill.

The wrapper is an Ecuadorean Habano rosado with a Mexican Matacapan binder and a filler consisting from Nicaraguan tobacco and Pennsylvania Broadleaf. The band is awesome, the shape is unique, it’s a crown, not a picture of a crown but completely shaped as a crown, very detailed and the brown of the ‘gaps’ in the crown matches the color of the wrapper perfectly. The simple yet matching foot band spells the name Sobremesa is beautiful curly letters. The wrapper is beautiful, shiny and I only see one vein. The construction feels good and the cigar has a medium strong barnyard aroma with also a hint of burned wood. I punched the cigar and found a great cold draw with some pepper and raisin.

After lighting the cigar with my Ronson varaflame I taste espresso with a woody background and a little sweetness. Soon the sweetness is stronger with wood, the espresso is gone.

After a third the sweetness is gone, the cigar now tastes like smooth oak with a little citrus aftertaste. Halfway I taste a little bit of sweetness again. The wood also changed a bit in flavor but it’s still wood. I also taste a very mild dark, mildly sweet, chocolate but is disappears quickly.

The smoke is white, thick and I get a medium amount of it. The burn starts of a bit crooked but it’s corrected itself. The ash is silver gray and beautifully layered. It’s also firm. The draw is great, no plugs and the right resistance. This is a great medium bodied yet full flavored cigar. The smoke time is about 90 minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? Hell yeah!

Score: 93

93

Categories: 93, Fabrica de Tabacos Joya de Nicaragua, Nicaraguan cigars, Sobremesa | Tags: , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

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