Monthly Archives: February 2017

Cigar of the month February

Over the last month I reviewed 8 cigars with my new 100 point rating system and the cigar of the month february is:

Viking Robusto by Viking Cigar with a 93 score

In January all of the scores were 89 and up, but since it was my first month of rating cigars with the 100 point system you could wonder it there was enough room to get a wider spread in scores, well this month that question is answered with a low score of 85 and a high score of 93.

Now as for the complete list of cigars I smoked in February for Cigarguideblog:

1) Viking Cigar Viking Robusto (Dominican Republic) 93 points
2) Casa Magna Colorado Lancero (Nicaragua) 91 points
3) Davidoff Colorado Claro Anniversario #3 (Dominican Republic) 91 points
4) Oliva series V Maduro Short Robusto (Nicaragua) 91 points
5) Jas Sum Kral Maduro Toro (Nicaragua) 90 points
6) CLE Corojo 11/18 (Honduras) 90 points
7) La Estancia Robusto (Honduras) 86 points
8) H. Upmann Half Corona (Cuba) 85 points

The high score for the Viking was a bit of a surprise to me for two reasons:
– I never really liked the cigars that they made before (Amero, Chess, Hawk) and even though they changed factory I had some prejudice.
– I never had a cigar made my Ernesto Perez Carrillo that impressed me a lot

But this cigar is fantastic, the best Dominican cigar I smoked in a while.

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Jas Sum Kral Maduro Toro

Jas Sum Kral might be the most talked about cigar of 2016 on social media. It’s the brand of Riste Riatevski and he uses the social media like nobody else in order to get his brand name out and sell his cigars. His Red Knight is blended together with Noel Rojas and made in Noel’s factory Tabacalera NOA. Riste is from Macedonian decent and the name Jas Sum Kral means “I am king” in his native language. The first release was just a 6×52 toro with an Ecuadorian Habano wrapper over a double binder, one Mexican San Andres and one Nicaraguan Jalapa and undisclosed filler. I’ve been in touch with Riste on Facebook for some time and got my hands on one of this original release Red Knight toros through an account of mine, Hans van de Wittenboer from Piet van Kuyk Cigars in Eindhoven, and it blew me away. So much that I asked my then employer, the largest independent premium cigar importer in The Netherlands to take on this brand, which he initially denied.


When the new vitolas came out, a lancero, lonsdale and robusto, I asked Riste for the international wholesale prices, called a few of my Facebook savvy accounts to see if they were interested, wrote a nice order and got back to my employer with everything worked out, the fixed retail prices and the biggest order Riste had until that moment. With so many boxes pre-sold my employer couldn’t say no any longer and The Netherlands became the first international market where the Jas Sum Kral brand was available. A few months later I parted from that employer and in my last week I used the company discount to buy some Joya Red Half Corona for my wife, her favorite cigar, and Jas Sum Kral Red Knight in all sizes for me. A review of the lancero can be found here (in my old scoring method, maybe I’ll do one in my new 100 point method later this year).


I finally met Riste in person at Intertabac 2016 last september and he gave me a new Jas Sum Kral Maduro toro, a cigar (6×52) that will only be released for international markets since it wasn’t ready for the dreaded august 8 deadline and can’t be introduced to the American market unless the FDA ruling is changed. I smoked one right at the show and decided to keep one for a review, this review. The ring is the same as for the Red Knight and is designed by the Singaporean designer Nuzli Hakiim who makes the most beautiful photos for his Instagram. The design is very detailed with great us of black, burgundy, gold and white letters on a good quality thick paper. The wrapper is beautifully dark, with some even darker spots, and two veins on the side and it’s leathery to the touch. The shape of the cigar is a bit off, it’s not completely round, the sides feel a little flattened but it feels evenly filled. The cigar has a dark aroma, a little bit charred and a wet dog with a hint of ammonia.


I decided to cut the cigar with my xi2 cutter from Xikar instead of punching it. The draw is fine and cold I taste dry raisin with a little spicy and peppery aftertaste. As almost every time when smoking indoor I lit the cigar with a soft flame and straight away I taste coffee, strong, bold and bitter. Soon I taste meaty and peppery flavor. The pepper is becoming really strong, maybe even too strong. Even the smoke smells peppery. After a centimeter I also taste some dark chocolate but with a lot of pepper.

Soon after a cedar flavor shows up as a backdrop for the pepper and after a third I taste a mild metallic flavor. The pepper is still the main flavor although it’s not too overpowering anymore. Halfway the cedar and metal get accompanied by chocolate as support to the jalapeño pepper. The background flavors change to wooden notes towards the ⅔rd mark. The aftertaste has some mint in it. After the ⅔ point I taste more of a salty walnut flavor with that metal and still the pepper. The final puffs are a toasty, nutty flavor with a lot of pepper.


The smoke is great, thick and luscious but I don’t like the gray color. The ash is white and dense. The draw is great. I had to touch up a few times to correct an uneven burn, I blame the thickness of the wrapper for that, but it does effect the score. This cigar is definitely full bodied and full flavored. The smoke time is an hour and a half. Unfortunately I didn’t get to use my awesome Jas Sum Kral nub tool.

Would I buy this cigar again? It’s a pepper bomb, a few years ago I loved pepper bombs but my preferences changed a little. This is a great post barbecue cigar so I’ll buy a few for the summer season. But for other occasions I will grab the red knight.

Score: 90

90

Categories: 90, Jas Sum Kral, Nicaraguan cigars, Tabacalera Noa | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments

CLE Corojo 11/18

CLE, Christian Luis Eiroa. For those whom that name doesn’t ring a bell, Christian Eiroa and his father were the masterminds behind Camacho, a brand they bought in 1995 five years after the death of brand founder Simon Camacho and they build the brand up using the knowledge and experience they head as tobacco farmers for generations. In 2008 they sold the brand and the factory to Davidoff but they didn’t leave the tobacco industry since they kept the farms. A few years, in 2012, later Eiroa entered the cigar making part of the business again with a new factory, based in the old movie theatre of his grandfather in Danli, Honduras and he is doing it his own way. Tabacalera Unidas is the mother company with several cooperations like Wynwood (started as a cooperation with Robert Caldwell before he dropped out), Asylum Cigars with Tom Lazuka, EH Cigars with Edgar Hoill and of course his own Eiroa cigars.


When the company just started my then employer went on a trip to Florida with his family. One unsuspecting afternoon he calls me all excited and tells me “man, I was at the Island Smoke Shop on Key Largo and your buddy Bill (who worked there at the time) gave me this cigar, Asylum 13, its a $5 cigar but its amazing”. Now I never heard from that cigar so I made a few calls and got in touch with Tom Lazuka and Christian Eiroa. To cut a long story short, it didn’t take long before we started distributing Tabacaleras Unidas in The Netherlands. After the release of the Asylum 13 line, including the ogre, and the Schizo bundles we released the CLE Corojo. This cigar is a Honduran puro with the leaf that made Camacho and the Eiroa family famous. And it also came out in the unique 11/18 shape that Eiroa created for Camacho. It’s a 6 inch long parejo with a little thicker part (ring 54 instead of 50 at the foot and the head) in the middle, unique.


The wrapper of the cigar looks nice, milk chocolate colored, few thin veins, a beautiful triple cap and its mild oily. The band is simple yet stylish. a nice mat black with shiny silver lettering CLE Corojo and a red 2012. I feel a little soft spot near the head of the cigar, but I can only imagine how difficult it is to roll this uniquely shaped cigar. The aroma is strong and its a barnyard aroma, manure and horses. The cold draw after the flat cut is easy and I taste a cedar with raisin flavor with a peppery flavor on my lips.


After I lit the cigar with my soft flame, I’m smoking inside so I don’t need a jet flame, I taste a mildly sweet and bitter coffee flavor, slowly I taste more cedar with a little citrus tang with a little pepper. After an inch I taste some cedar and wood. After a third I also taste some chocolate and the citrus has grown in strength. Halfway a honey like sweetness shows up. The flavors are quite dry. The chocolate is still mildly around with some nutmeg and cinnamon.


The smoke is thick, white and plentiful. The draw is easy, maybe a little too easy but just a little. The ash is gray and a little frayed. The burn is good, no correction needed. The cigar is medium to full bodied and equally flavored. The smoke time is an hour and thirty minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? I prefer the robusto.

Score: 90

90

Categories: 90, Eiroa, El Aladino, Honduran cigars | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

H. Upmann Half Corona

In 2011 Habanos released a new H. Upmann vitola, and since H. Upmann is my favorite Cuban brand I was excited to hear the news, especially since it wasn’t a 55+ ring release but a small cigar, a 3 1/2×44 Half Corona. At first they came in dress boxes of 25 cigars but the big boom came a year later when they released the same cigar in beautiful tins of 5 cigars each. The tins were perfect to take cigars with you and fitted right into your shirts pocket. The tins were so popular that they sold out quickly and it took a long time for Habanos to restock the Dutch market.


Now I don’t smoke a lot of Cubans, there is too much to complain about when it comes to the aging of tobacco, the quality of the rollers, the quality of tobacco and especially the myth that the Cuban cigars are the best in the world. They used to be, there is no denying that and yes, Cuban tobacco has a specific flavor you won’t find in tobacco elsewhere just like Ometepe tobacco has specific characteristics, like Pennsylvania Broadleaf has specific characteristics and so on, but hardliners only talk about the characteristics of the Cubans like Cuban tobacco is divine and I happen to have another opinion. My take is that yes, Cubans used to be the best and I even think that Cuban cigars have the potential to be the best again but right now they are not and if the regime and mentality on Cuba doesn’t change they won’t be the best ever again. They rush the tobacco and cigars out, the fermentation of the tobacco and the aging of the cigars are not properly done, the quality control is poor (only 4% of the Cuban cigars are tested for quality) and the land is depleted due to mono culture and a lack of fertilizer. And it’s a shame, the quality of Cuban cigars could be out of this world if everything was done right. I could write a whole editorial about this if I want, but then again, this is a review blog so let stick to reviewing and hope that that Habanos sees their problems and deals with them accordingly.


The Half Corona that i’m smoking for this review comes from a box with the box code of april 2013. Now stamping the boxes with a code is something I love about the Cuban cigar industry. If I owned a factory or brand I would do the same, of go even a step further with a stamp that mentions the month and year the cigars are rolled but also the year of the crop of the wrapper, binder and filler just to inform the consumer on the age of the tobacco and cigars. The wrapper is a nice medium brown, like milky chocolate, with few minor veins and the triple cap is beautiful. What I do notice about the cigar is the way the foot has been cut, its not straight, if I put the cigar on its foot the cigar had the same tilt as the leaning tower of Pisa as you can see in the picture above. When I touch the cigar I feel a soft spot at the head of the cigar, which actually doesn’t surprise me considering the low quality control on Cuba. The band is the regular H. Upmann band, not fancy, very classic. The cigar has a manure aroma to it, medium strong. I punched the cigar and the cold draw is a bit on the tough side.


I light the cigar with my trusted Ronson varaflame which is older than I am.  I taste coffee and a wooden flavor but it’s mild to medium. After a short time I taste a very mild peanut flavor, unsalted peanuts. Slowly the flavors are a little bit stronger and I taste now some earthy flavors with the peanut. After two thirds I taste earthy flavors with some white pepper on my lips. The flavor than changes to nuts. At the end i alsof taste some citrus.


The draw has a little more resistance than I like, but I’ve had worse, especially in Cubans. The smoke is thin, gray and not a lot of volume. The ash is light gray, firm and dense. The burn is quite good, not razor sharp but good enough. This cigar is mild to medium bodied and medium flavored. The smoke time is about 50 minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? I still have half a box and even though I love the size I rather smoke the Joya Red Half Corona if I want this vitola.

Score: 85

85

Categories: 85, Cuban cigars, H. Upmann (Habanos), H. Upmann Factory | Tags: , , , | 1 Comment

Casa Magna Colorado Lancero

Let me start by saying that even though this cigar will count as my lancero review of the month and will be a contestant in the ‘lancero of the year’ list that I will compile at the end of the year, officialy this is not a lancero. It’s called a lancero, it looks like a lancero, and it comes close to a lancero but the size is not a classic lancero size with a length that is an inch longer and a ring gauge that’s also slightly thicker than what’s considered industry standard for a lancero (7 1/2×38 vs 8 1/2×40 for this Casa Magna Lancero). It’s actually an old size used by Manolo Quesada and back then the name was ‘largo delgado’ which translates to “long skinny”. I still count it as a lancero because the size differences are only minor unlike the Alec Bradley (‘everything is bigger in’) Texas Lancero (7×70).


Casa Magna is a cooperation between the Quesada family, who are well known and respected cigar makers from the Dominican Republic and the Plasencia family from Nicaragua. That Manuel Quesada got the Cigar Journal Lifetime Achievement award last september at the award dinner at Intertabac is a testament to their accomplishments and knowledge. In 2008 they shook the world by becoming the no.1 on Cigar Aficionado’s Top 25 with this blend and that for a cigar that would usually be featured on the yearly ’top budget cigars’. This all Nicaraguan blend hit the right spot and became an international hit, with offsprings as the Casa Magna Oscuro (from Honduras), Casa Magna Domus Magnus series and most recently a Dominican made Casa Magna. The Casa Magna Lancero was released in 2011 but with a MSRP that was much higher than the other Casa Magna vitola’s at $12.95 and came in boxes of 7 to keep the box price below $100. I reviewed the cigar back in 2011, when it wasn’t for sale in The Netherlands and with my old scores in my old apartment, time for a new try, this time in my man cave, with my 100 point scoring system and cigars legally bought in The Netherlands where they were for sale for a limited time.


The cigar looks great, a nice dark and oily wrapper with a few minor veins, a closed foot and a lovely little pigtail. A well printed ring with quite some details on thick paper. If you scan the ring it looks simple but when you pay more attention you notice all small details and since I started paying more attention to the cigar rings I seem to enjoy the cigars a little more, maybe because of the appreciation of the pieces of art that cigar rings can be. The aroma is amazing, its like walking deep inside a forest in the fall with the smell of fermenting leafs, moss, animals and the aroma is quite strong. Construction wise I don’t have any complaints either, the cigar seems evenly filled and since a lancero is one of the harder vitolas to roll I take my hat off to the roller responsible.


The cigar is too thin to punch so I cut the cigar with my Xikar butterfly cutter. The cold draw is a little tough with a little bit of wood and quite some pepper. I used my soft flame to light the cigar. Right from the start I taste coffee with some salt and plenty of pepper. After a few puffs I also taste a little honey sweetness. The coffee goes away, I now taste earthy flavors and some chocolate with chilies. The flavors are very vibrant as you can expect from a cigar with a great filler wrapper ratio as a lancero. Just like the aroma, the flavors remind me of autumn.

After a third I still taste the earthy flavors with pepper but now with something I would describe as autumn leafs. I also taste some salt and a little licorice. The pepper gets stronger and is now the main flavor. On the background I also taste some vanilla. Slowly I also taste a nice wood flavor, oak. Some puffs later I also taste some citrus. The pepper is still the main flavor though, strong and powerful.


The draw is great, better than in the cold draw and since the lancero is so difficult to make again my hat off to the roller. The smoke is white, relatively thick and a decent amount of it. The ash is salt and pepper colored, a bit frayed too. The burn is quite good, not razor sharp, but still good. The cigar is full bodied, full flavored. I really enjoyed this cigar for almost 2 hours.

Would I buy this cigar again? Once I’m out I’ll try to find another box, I still have a full one though.

Score: 91

91

Categories: 91, Casa Magna, Nicaraguan cigars | Tags: , , , , | 1 Comment

Viking Viking Robusto

A few years back I met a Norwegian guy, nickname Hawk, at the Intertabac trade show who had his own brands of cigars named Chess, Hawk and Amero. These cigars were Dominican made and for some reason his factory manager in the Dominican Willis Cabrera added me to Facebook. Now the last 2 years I didn’t see the owner of the brand Hawk at the show, neither did I see a booth and Willis disappeared from my Facebook friend list too, why I don’t know. Much to my surprise I saw Hawk again this year, not with Chess cigars but with a new brand: Viking Cigar. Now Hawk was busy so we didn’t have time to chat but I did get a cigar to try from his German distributer who told me all the Viking Cigar lines were made by the legendary Ernesto Perez Carrillo, who at that exact moment dropped by the booth.


I went to the Viking website to see which line of cigars I got, to get some details for this review but much to my surprise I couldn’t find details of the blend, just a story about Leiv Ericsson, a legendary viking around the year 1000 and according to the saga he discovered America almost half a century before Columbus did. I also googled Willis Cabrera and discovered he now has his own brand of cigars too but thats something for another day. What I did get from the website was that I got a sample of the Viking line, one of the three lines they have, the others are Norseman and Nordic Warrior. On the Viking Facebook page I found a short video where Ernesto explains a little about the cigar, it contains Dominican and Nicaraguan fillers with a USA broadleaf wrapper.


The first thing that you notice, except for the beautiful dark, thick, oily wrapper, which feels quite leathery, is the beautiful ring. Now its not a ring of paper but its made of tinplate, which makes it quite unique. The design has a viking helmet, the word Norway is on top and Dominican Republic is printed at the bottom. The band is just awesome and the coolest novelty i’ve seen at the Intertabac trade show this year. The cigar has a nice barnyard aroma, not too strong and quite pleasant. The construction feels good, the cigar seems evenly filled.


After i cut the cigar with the xikar xi2 I get a good cold draw with some pepper on my lips. The cigar tastes sweet with some coffee and earthy tones right after I lit it with a soft flame. The sweetness reminds me a lot of caramel, and it pushes the coffee completely away, I still taste some pepper on the background though. After an inch I taste more of an earthy flavor with some spices while the caramel just tones it down a little. After a third i feel the cigar in the back of my throat but that feeling disappears quickly too. After that I taste toast but still with a great caramel flavor. Slowly but surely I feel a nice pepper in the aftertaste with a little bit of earthy notes. The caramel slowly loses part of its strength while the pepper and spice slowly gains a little strength without becoming overpowering. At the end I taste a nice mixture of nuts, caramel and spices, so nice I grabbed my nub tool to enjoy every last puff.


The smoke is medium thick but I get plenty of it. The ash is light colored, dense and firm. The burn needed to be corrected once. The cigar is medium plus bodied but full of flavor, the balance is great. The draw is flawless. The smoke time is about an hour and twenty minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? Yes, this might be the best cigar from the Perez Carrillo factory I’ve smoked so far.

Score: 93

93

Categories: 93, Dominican cigars, Tabacalera La Alianza, Viking | Tags: , , , , , | 4 Comments

La Estancia Robusto

In 2014 a new cigar came to the market, amongst many others, but this one had a story that made cigar aficionado’s very excited and the cigar was highly anticipated. Why you might ask? Well, for two different reasons, first of all it was a cigar from the Meerapfel family, a well known and respected family in the cigar industry with a 140 year old history. If you smoke Cameroon tobacco, it is most likely grown by the Meerapfel family and they also distribute brands like Padron and Fuente in Europe for decades now. The second reason to be excited was the tobacco used. The Meerapfels are not just tobacco growers but also tobacco traders and since they are not an American business they have been able to buy Cuban tobacco not bothered by the embargo, and they did! The older generations of Meerapfels stored the tobacco to sell once the embargo was lifted but the new generation, Joshua & Jeremiah, decided it was time to use that tobacco.


They found a Honduran factory, undisclosed to the public, and created a blend of a Nicaraguan wrapper and filler tobacco from Nicaragua, Honduras, Dominican Republic and aged Cuban tobacco, dating back to the 1970’s. Now call me a cigar geek, but just that fact makes me excited and curious. Jeremiah Meerapfel did state that they used a Nicaraguan wrapper instead of a Cameroon wrapper from their own farms because of the price of Cameroon tobacco, which is much higher than Caribbean tobacco.


The box is cubanesque, styled after the Partagas boxes but just a little nicer finished, and the ring is also very Cuban inspired with the same star you find on the Cuban flag on the ring. If you look further you will see a drawing in the style of old maps of Cuba and a picture of Havana, add that to the text ‘Tabacco Cubano’ and you almost forget that this is in fact a Honduran cigar with some Cuban tobacco. The ring is very detailed though and much nicer than you think at first glance. The wrapper is medium brown, mild shiny and not the best looking wrapper ever with the long veins but it’s also not an ugly wrapper. The construction feels good, no hard or soft spots. When it comes to aroma this cigar scores bad, I hardly smell anything.


I decided to go with a straight cut with my Xikar x2 cutter and use my Ronson soft flame to light the cigar, I prefer a soft flame over a torch except when smoking outdoors. Right from the start this cigar is spicy with espresso, all quite dry tasting though. After a few puffs the espresso turns to coffee with pepper. The pepper is getting a little stronger but after a centimeter the aged Cuban tobacco shows up and a very subtle flavor you only find in Cuban cigars shows up. It’s not easy to describe it, but it’s something I only tasted in Cuban cigars.

Soon after the coffee is replaced by some chocolate. Halfway I taste oak with a little chocolate, pepper and a citrus aftertaste but still with that Cuban touch. Slowly the pepper is getting stronger. After two thirds the proper slowed down again and that aged Cuban tobacco shows up again. At the end I taste a nice nutty flavor.


The smoke is ok, white and plentiful but it could be a little thicker. It was too much for my cat though, she was sleeping on my lap, saw the smoke and went outside. The ash is pepper and salt colored and beautifully layered. The burn is good but a little crooked. The cigar is medium bodied and medium flavored. The smoke time was about 80 minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? No, I really liked these when they just came out but age didn’t do the blend good.

Score: 86

86

Categories: 86, Honduran cigars, La Estancia | Tags: , , , | 1 Comment

Oliva serie V Maduro Short Robusto Edición Europa 2010

In 2006 the Nicaraguan cigar producing and tobacco growing family of Oliva and their Oliva Cigar Company, not to be mistaken by the Oliva Tobacco Company who are also tobacco growers but not related, released their strongest cigar to their portfolio, the Oliva Series V and with succes, the torpedo made it into the top 25 of Cigar Aficionado the next year and the blend has been voted in that top 25 for 6 years in a row, an industry record. In 2008 Oliva released a limited edition maduro version of the Series V in a torpedo shape and a Broadleaf wrapper and repeated that in 2009 with a different wrapper, Nicaraguan Habano Maduro this time. In 2010 they changed the size to a 6×54 with yet another another wrapper, Mexican San Andres Maduro and they not only released a limited edition for the USA but also a different size just for the European Market. For Europe they picked a 4 1/2×50 Short Robusto, 1500 boxes of 10 cigars were made. I really loved the 2008 release but wasn’t impressed with the later releases until I smoked this one.


Now this review is not the only one this cigar. I gave a few to Brooks from Halfwheel.com a few years back and he posted a review. The prices mentioned on Halfwheel come from U.K. based websites and the U.K. has crazy taxes. In The Netherlands the cigar had a fixed price tag of €8,50. The cigar has been aging for a minimum of 6 years so the cellophane is discolored from the inside. The band is the normal Oliva serie V band, big, beautiful and printed in my home country of The Netherlands at Vrijdag Printing. The wrapper is dark, toothy, rough and leathery with some veins and it feels leathery. It is not a good looking wrapper when you base it on esthetics but it’s beautifully intimidating. The construction feels good. After a punch I had a tight draw so I made a cut with my xikar butterfly cutter and then the mild spicy cold draw was good. The aroma is thick, rich and deep, reminds me of a horse stable.


I managed to lit the cigar with the last remaining gas in my vintage Ronson and straight away I taste espresso with a lot of cane sugar, it’s like Cuban coffee. After a centimeter the espresso becomes a little milder and the sweetness also toned down a little. The flavors are getting a little toasty though.


Halfway I still taste sweetness but now with more earthy flavors and a little bit of pepper. This Maduro wrapper surely lives up to the ‘Maduro is sweeter’ people always say but it’s not overpowering. After two thirds I get more of a woody flavor with some pepper and the sweetness, which now reminds me of honey.


The smoke from this small cigar is medium thick, not as thick as I like and not as much as I like either so there go some points. The ash on the other hand is amazing, white and very dense. The burn is a little bit off but not enough to correct. The draw is great, but I always expect good draw from Oliva. This cigar is medium plus bodied and medium to full flavored. The smoke time of this enjoyable cigar is close to 90 minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? They are nowhere to be found, its been over 6 years since they were released but I’m glad I bought all the boxes I could find.

Score: 91

91

Categories: 91, Nicaraguan cigars, Oliva, Tabacalera Oliva | Tags: , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Refrigerator to humidor conversion

A few weeks ago I posted a small video on youtube and dedicated a post on my blog about my dedicated lancero humidor. It is a 1950’s or 1960’s refrigerator from Bosch that was still in working condition when I bought it of the Dutch version of graigslist.

My dad, who’s much more of a handyman than I am, helped me out, he did most of the work to be honest. First we ripped the engine out, then removed everything from the inside, installed sliders for drawers. Then my dad made the drawers from plywood and birch, lacquered them so they are humidity resistent.

I installed a Hydra XL and some led lighting and its now (almost) full with lanceros only.

 

 

 

 

Categories: Misc | Leave a comment

Davidoff Colorado Claro Aniversario #3

In my walk-in humidor I like to keep every cigar in the box it came in but in reality that’s impossible due to a few reasons including the space that I would need and because I have lots of single sticks that I either bought as a single, traded or got gifted without the box. So those cigars are in a few ‘miscellaneous’ boxes and today I grabbed a cigar from one of those boxes with my eyes closed. Turned out I grabbed the 6×50 Davidoff Colorado Claro Aniversario #3.


To be honest, Davidoff never really was one of my favorites, most of them are too mild and plain boring to my palate and way to expensive when you compare value for money. Yes, I did enjoy the Millennium Blend Lancero a lot but all the regular stuff isn’t my cup of tea but since they woke up and revamped the brand with the Nicaragua, Escurio and Yamasa the brand came back on my radar. I really liked the Nicaragua, the Escurio was good too and I have yet to try the Yamasa. I still think that they overcharge though but maybe i’m just cheap. Now back to this Davidoff Colorado Claro, it didn’t ring a bell so I went to the Davidoff website but no mention of the Colorado Claro at all. Time for a google search and I found a little bit of information. It turns out that the Colorado Claro is a rare sight, a small batch production with a sun grown Ecuadorean Colorado wrapper and Dominican filler and binder. The cigar has a feisty price tag of more than 20 USD and therefor confirms my prejudice on the price point of Davidoff cigars. Lucky for Davidoff I don’t score on value for money.


The reddish brown wrapper looks beautiful and is silky to the touch, the classic Davidoff ring is accompanied by a second ring in the same white with golden lettering but with a burgundy detail. Simple yet classy. The construction feels good, but hey, it is a Davidoff and they do know how to roll a well made cigar otherwise they wouldn’t be so famous right? The cigar has a medium strong barnyard aroma, very pleasant. I decided to punch the cigar, which led to a great cold draw with a little raisin and pepper.


I taste a nice espresso with a little pepper. This is much spicier than I expected from an offspring of the classic Davidoff series. After a centimeter I taste wood with a little metallic flavor on the background and a little hint of pepper. After an inch the pepper gets stronger again, the metallic flavor mellows out. After a third the cigar has a nice mixture of wood, pepper and a little bit of that metallic flavor. Slowly the metallic grows stronger and I also taste a tiny hint of dark chocolate. Halfway all of a sudden the flavor turns to nutty with pepper and far far on the background some dark chocolate. After the two thirds mark the main flavor is pepper and the pepper keeps growing with the nuts as a supporting flavor.


The draw is a bit loose, which caused the smoke to start out thin but it got better quickly, thick and white. The ash is white, dense and thick. The burn is pretty sharp, not razor sharp but close enough. This is a medium full cigar, full flavored. This cigar gave me two hours of enjoyment.

Would I buy this cigar again? I might, for a special occasion but the hefty price tag makes it impossible for me to smoke it on a regular basis.

Score: 91

91

Categories: 91, Cigars Davidoff, Davidoff, Dominican cigars | Tags: , , , , | 1 Comment

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