Author Archives: cigarguide

Bossner Black Edition Torpedo

Bossner Black Edition Torpedo. Bossner Cigars is a German brand. And their cigars are made in both Nicaragua and the Dominican Republic. The brand leans heavy on a luxurious image, with a strong Russian influence when it comes to style. The company was founded in 1993 but doesn’t limit itself to just cigars. There is fashion under the Bossner name. Liquor is also part of the Bossner family. Just like all kinds of other delicacies such as sweets and chocolates.

Most of the Bossner products are priced in the uber premium price range of the cigar industry. For the Black Edition, the company chose to create a medium-priced cigar. The cigars are available in four sizes. The fixed prices in Germany range from € 5,80 for the Corona up to € 7,50 for the Torpedo. The factory is undisclosed, all we know is that the cigar is made in Nicaragua. The wrapper comes from Ecuador. All the other tobaccos are Nicaraguan.


The cigar looks great. A nice, dark and oily wrapper but a big vein disturbs the smooth surface. The black and silver ring is over the top though. Yet that is part of the Bossner style, all their products look super luxurious and posh. The silver on the ring is flaky, making it look like it’s embossed with diamonds. It is something unique though and has that Bossner signature. The cigar feels well constructed, and the head of the cigar is beautifully shaped. That’s not the case with all torpedos, but this Bossner Black Edition has an immaculate finish. The barnyard aroma is quite strong.


The cold draw is a little tight. The cigar taste like raw tobacco with raisin. After lighting there are hints of coffee, chocolate, pepper, leather, and wood. Slowly, the cigar turns woodier with pepper and sugar water as supporting flavors. The mouthfeel is meaty, with pepper, wood, leather, chocolate, and sweetness. There’s also a strong flavor of burned toast. After that, the cigar gets a charred wood flavor that becomes dominant. And it’s not the best flavor to taste in a cigar. Fortunately, there is some sweetness as well, and some chocolate to mask the bitterness. Then the cigar turns to pepper again, abandoning that charred aroma. The thick, meaty mouthfeel remains, with pepper, greasy chocolate and a flavor that is best described as a cigarette. Now, we haven’t smoked cigarettes in close to 30 years, so it might not be accurate, but it reminds us of that taste. It’s also grassy with a little bit of salt. The finale is wood and pepper.


The draw is fine. The smoke could be a little thicker though. And the burn had to be touched up in the early stages of smoking. The smoke time of this medium-full bodied, medium-full flavored cigar is two hours and thirty-five minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? I would smoke it when given to me, but buying it, probably not

number89

Categories: Nicaraguan cigars | Leave a comment

Alec Bradley Project 40 05.50

Alec Bradley Project 40 05.50 Robusto. Earlier this year, Alec Bradley released Project 40. Alan Rubin, owner and founder of the cigar brand, found inspiration in science. “Project 40 is a generally accepted concept in multiple industries with the end goal to find how a service or product can have a positive impact on the mind and body. Since cigars bring people together, cause for relaxation and create positive experiences, I asked myself why this concept should not be applied to premium cigars. This was my inspiration for Alec Bradley Project 40,” Rubin said. Rubin is a firm believer that cigars have a calming effect. And that belief is backed by several scientific research projects. It is a science-based fact that if people relax and wind down, the stress levels drop. And lower stress means a lower risk of cardiac arrest and other illnesses. And smoking cigars forces you to slow down and relax. Therefore a cigar is stress-reducing.

To make the cigars, Alec Bradley went to Nicaragua. But not to their regular address in Nicaragua, Plasencia Cigars. Instead, they picked J. Fuego to roll the Project 40 blend. The blend is made with Nicaraguan fillers and a Nicaraguan wrapper. The binder is a Brazilian Habano leaf. The cigars are named after the sizes. All are straight cigars, parejo. There is a 5×50 version called 05.50. Then there are a 06.25, a 07.50 and a 06.60. I reviewed the 05.50 robusto, a cigar Bradley Rubin gave us at the Intertabac trade show.


The Colorado colored wrapper has a big vein in the front of the cigar. The ring should have been placed differently so that the vein would be on the back, making it a more appealing cigar. The secondary ring is metallic sky blue with the words experimental series. The main ring is white with gold and a big Project 40 logo. On the backside, the whole idea behind project 40 is explained. The construction feels good. The cigar has an aroma of hay and the aroma is medium strong.


The cold draw is great. Flavors from the cold draw are raisin, wood, and raw tobacco. After lighting the first flavors are harsh, almost like medicinal cough medicine. There is some sweetness, some leather, some spices, earth, and wood. But it’s not a great start, to say the least. The harshness gets a little less strong, some cinnamon comes through. But the cigar still remains unbalanced. After a centimeter, the flavors are sweet and fresh, young wood with some pepper and spice. It slowly evolves to sweetness with wood, soil, leather, toast, pepper, and grass. Unbalanced, unrefined. After a third, it’s coffee with earthiness and sweetness, yet still, with that unrefined, slightly harsh, finish. The cigar then picks up in sweetness, pepper, and oak. The other flavors are gone. In the final third, the cigar gets more refined with sweetness, pepper, wood, and vegetal flavors. It turns to sweetness and cedar, with a hint of pepper. The cigar feels more balanced now, and even a tad creamy. The retrohale is pleasant now.


The draw is great. The ash is white and quite firm. The burn is good, not perfect but good. And the cigar produces a nice amount of white smoke. It’s a medium-bodied, medium flavored cigar. But it’s harsh, unrefined and unbalanced.

Would I buy this cigar again? Nope.

number89

Categories: 89, Alec Bradley, Nicaraguan cigars | Tags: , , , , | Leave a comment

Antigua Esteli Segovia Maduro Toro.

Antigua Esteli Segovia Maduro Toro. The first time we ever saw or heard the brand was on social media. At first, we figured it would be one of those private labels again that try to make a few bucks before disappearing into the swamp. The swamp where many other small private labels have been buried over the years. But the more we looked into Antigua Esteli, the more we were intrigued. And the more we wanted to try one of those cigars. We connected with owner and founder Art Garcia and learned more about the brand. It’s more than just a simple private label. Garcia runs his own crew at the factory, his rollers, blenders and buys the tobacco himself. In September we finally met at the Intertabac trade show and weaseled a few cigars so we could finally smoke them


We scored the Antigua Esteli Segovia Maduro Toro. That’s a 6×56 cigar, made in Nicaragua. The fillers and binder are all Nicaraguan. The tobacco comes from four different regions in Nicaragua. The wrapper comes from the San Andres region in Mexico. The shape is unusual, it’s not fully box-pressed, it’s not round but it’s semi box-pressed.


The cigar looks beautiful. An evenly dark, smooth and oily wrapper. Great shape with a triple cap. The cigar feels well constructed. The ring is detailed, with tobacco fields, the logo. And both the American and Nicaraguan flags in a banner combining the two countries. The secondary ring says Segovias Maduro. The aroma is strong, barnyard, wood, and forest come to mind.


The cold draw is easy, and it leaves a peppery flavor on the lips. A tingling sensation. Add a raw tobacco flavor to it, and that’s what the cold draw tastes like. Once lit, there is a mix of coffee, leather, soil, spices, and pepper. The bitterness of the coffee is a nice contrast with the creaminess of the mouthfeel. Soon it’s more coffee with leather and spices. There’s also a bit of citrus, and the mouthfeel remains creamy. After a third, it’s a toasty coffee flavor with wood, spices, and pepper. Still creamy though. The creaminess makes the flavors feel silky smooth. The final third starts with ice cream without the numbing cold of ice cream. Vanilla sweetness, cream, and roasted coffee beans. Then the coffee returns, with way more pepper than before.


The draw is great, and the burn is straight as an arrow. The ash is white, but a bit brittle. The cigar produces a lot of smoke. The flavors are all smooth, round, and soft. Yet medium to medium-full in flavors, and medium in strength. The smoke time is two hours and thirty minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? Yes I will
number91

Categories: 91, Antigua Esteli, Nicaraguan cigars | Tags: , , , , , | Leave a comment

Steenbok Robusto

Steenbok Robusto. This Honduran puro is a Dutch cigar brand, made at Compania Hondurena de Tabacos in El Paraiso, Honduras. That’s where brands such as Kuuts, Miro, Placeres, and Zapata are made as well. The brand is founded by two cigar aficionados, Johan Loomans and Brigitte Altena, from The Netherlands. The brand was released in 2018. The packaging of the cigars is cool, silver tins containing either the robusto, mini-robusto, or the half corona. The cigars are for sale in The Netherlands only for now.


The blend is made of all Honduran tobacco and with that, it’s one of the few Honduran puros on the market in The Netherlands. The robusto measures 5×50, the classic robusto size. Steenbok Cigars handed us this sample at the Intertabac trade show in Dortmund, Germany last September.


The ring is huge and white. But what makes it stand out is that the brand isn’t printed. The letters are cut out so the wrapper is forming the name of the cigar. Handmade in Honduras is printed though, but in a color very close to the wrapper. The wrapper is bumpy with a few veins. And right over the ring, there is some discoloration due to water drops during fermentation. The construction feels good though. The burned wood aroma is quite strong.


The cold draw is great with a mild coffee and strong tobacco flavor. Once lit, the cigar produces a sweet coffee flavor. Some grassy flavors show up and match the coffee in strength. There’s also a little bit of leather and some pepper. The cigar has quite some sweetness too, and a bit of a dusty aftertaste that is typical for Connecticut Shade. But this cigar doesn’t have a Connecticut Shade wrapper so its a question where that comes from. There’s also a little nuttiness. The flavors also get some wood and herbs. But it’s all mild and sweet. The cigar is not unpleasant but lacks character. After a third, the cigar turns very creamy, with vanilla and some more pepper. And now the cigar is getting more interesting. After two thirds, the flavors are creamy, buttery with wood and pepper. The finale brings a lot of pepper, what a difference from the start


The draw is great, and the cigar produces a good amount of smoke. The burn is great. The ash is firm but dark. The cigar is smooth and balanced. Medium-bodied at best, medium flavored. The start lacks character but the cigar gains traction halfway. The smoke time is two hours and twenty minutes

Would I buy this cigar again? Yes, it’s a nice smooth medium cigar for a very nice price
number90

Categories: 90, Honduran cigars, Steenbok | Tags: , , | Leave a comment

Tatuaje Fausto IT MM19

Tatuaje Fausto IT MM19. This is a release exclusively for Italy, in a limited production of 4000 cigars. And this is the second year in a row that Italy received an exclusive Tatuaje. The Fausto line saw the light in 2011, even though the blend was released as a store exclusive limited edition in 2009. Pete Johnson created the Tatuaje T110, a short robusto, for a shop in Hawaii. The T stands for thermonuclear and it was the strongest Tatuaje ever made. The cigar became such a hype that the limited edition turned into a regular production line with the Fausto name. But the T110 size never re-appeared with this blend.


The Fausto blend consists of Nicaraguan filler and binder. The regular production Fausto sports an Ecuadorian Habano wrapper but for both the Italian exclusive releases, Johnson went for a Mexican San Andres wrapper.

The cigar looks fantastic. A very dark Mexican San Andres wrapper with a nice triple cap. The red & black Tatuaje Fausto ring is the main ring. The secondary ring is a ring that Tatuaje uses for the Mexican Experiment and other limiteds. White with red and green. The two rings don’t match together, which is aesthetically not appealing. The Fausto IT MM19 feels well constructed. The aroma is strong, pepper with barnyard and charred wood.


The cold draw is good. Except for some pepper, the cold draw doesn’t have much flavor. With the reputation of Fausto, you’d expect a punch in the face but the cigar starts mellow. Smooth coffee, almost like a latte with a little bit of spice and pepper. After a few puffs, there is some citrus, leather, spice, toast, and pepper. The cigar then evolves with a little more sweetness and dried grass. Slowly the cigar transforms into a leathery, peppery cigar with some wood and spices. After a third, the cigar has a sweetness that is hard to describe, almost vegetal. There are pepper and leather as well. At this point, the strength of the cigar isn’t hidden anymore. It starts to live up the reputation. Halfway it’s pepper with wood and leather. And there is also a little chocolate in the background.


The draw is flawless. The light gray ash is dense and beautiful. The burn is straight. The Tatuaje Fausto isn’t a smoke bomb, but the cigar produces a nice amount of medium thick smoke. It’s a full-bodied cigar, but because of the balance, it doesn’t feel that strong in the first third. But then the power really picks up. This is a full-flavored cigar. The smoke time is two hours and forty-five minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? If I could

number92

Categories: 92, My Father Cigars, Nicaraguan cigars, Tatuaje | Tags: , , , ,

Joya de Nicaragua Numero Uno L’Ambassadeur

Joya de Nicaragua Numero Uno L’Ambassadeur. That is a long name for a unique cigar. You can call it the Nicaraguan Cohiba or Trinidad, as the history shares some resemblance. All three were diplomatic gifts before being released commercially years later. The Joya de Nicaragua Numero Uno was released this year, after surfacing as an event only cigar last year. The production is limited to 1500 boxes a year, and only one size is available. That’s this Lonsdale called L’Ambassadeur, which is a reference to the diplomatic history of this cigar.


In the past, the Nicaraguan government used another Joya de Nicaragua cigar as the official gift. That was the Antaño 1970, a strong cigar. With the Numero Uno, they went for a milder cigar. The Connecticut Shade wrapper from Ecuador is much milder tobacco than the strong wrapper and blend from the Antaño. The filler and binder tobaccos are all from Nicaragua.

The pale wrapper looks decent. There is some shine from the oil, thin veins. It’s just a typical thin and brittle Connecticut Shade wrapper. The blue from the big cigar ring pops, it’s a nice contrast from the pale yellowish-brown wrapper. The cigar has a triple cap with a little pigtail. The construction feels good, with the right amount of bounce. The aroma is medium in strength. It has that grassy hay aroma that you can expect from Connecticut Shade wrappers.


The cold draw is fine. It gives a lot of flavor, raw tobacco and raisins. After lighting it’s earthy, coffee, pepper, nutmeg, and a little muted sweetness. Then some slightly harsh grass flavor shows up too, with a hint of milk chocolate. The classic Connecticut Shade mustiness isn’t as strong as in most Connecticut Shade cigars, but it is there, looming on the background. The flavors then evolve to soil, leather, citrus, pepper, and salt. The mouthfeel is a bit creamy. The cigar turns grassy again, with cedar. The mustiness is no longer lingering on the background. Halfway the cigar is creamy with old leather, licorice, and sweetness. And for a while, there is a black licorice flavor. After two thirds, it’s the old leather with spices, pepper, cedar, and that typical Connecticut mustiness. In the final part, the cigar is creamy with toast, cedar, sweetness, and pepper.


The draw is fantastic. And since thinner ring cigars are harder to roll than the ticker cigars, a compliment to the rollers is well deserved. The ash is white. And the smoke is decent, both in thickness and volume. The burn is good. This cigar is mild to medium-bodied, medium flavored. The smoke time is three hours.

Would I buy this cigar again? No, it’s not suitable for my palate.

number90

Categories: 90, Fabrica de Tabacos Joya de Nicaragua, Joya de Nicaragua, Nicaraguan cigars | Tags: , , , ,

Skull 77 El Unico

Skull 77 El Unico. The El Unico is the toro size of the Skull 77 by Cigare 77. The brand is made in Costa Rica, at the Vegas de Santiago facilities. But it is Swiss-owned. Laurent Taha is the owner, and he picked the 77 number for a very special reason. He is born on January 1st, 1977. And launched his brand on July 7, 2014. The double seven comes back several times. For now, only three sizes are available. The blends are mostly the same, although a little tweaked for each specific size. None of the three vitolas is thinner than a 58 ring though, the thickest is a ring 66.


For the wrapper, Taha picked a Habano 2000 leaf from Ecuador. Cigare 77 didn’t disclose the binder. For the filler, tobaccos from Peru, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, and the Dominican Republic are used. As mentioned before, the blends vary per size, to create the optimal flavor experience in each of the vitolas. The brand is currently expanding it’s distribution and recently added Sweden as one of the new markets. And from January, the brand will be available in the United Kingdom too.

The cigar looks good. A nice, smooth, Colorado colored wrapper. Oily and there are no ugly thick veins visible. The ring, designed by Taha and his close friend & artist Claudio Capuano, is a nice looking, cigar-smoking skull. The glowing red eye did remind us of Terminator. Even though it’s a big and thick cigar, it feels quite light. The little pigtail cap is a nice detail. The aroma isn’t very strong, it’s both floral and a classic barnyard aroma.


The cold draw is very light, very easy. The flavors from the cold draw are sweetness and sultana at first, with a strong and spicy raw tobacco aftertaste. After lighting, it’s coffee, leather, and soil. Quite dry flavors. The flavors then turn spicy and grassy, still with some coffee though. The flavors then evolve to wood, spice, leaves and mild marzipan sweetness. The flavors are a little rough around the edges. The sweetness is that of powdered icing sugar, with grass and leather after a third. Very mild milk chocolate shows up too, with grass, wood, and leather. In the final third, there’s pepper, leather, and young wood. Still a little rough and the mouthfeel is dry. The harshness grows a bit too. In the end, the coffee returns.


The draw is a bit loose, but not too loose that it’s a problem. The burn is a bit wonky, but again, not too bad that it’s a problem. The smoke is quite full and has a decent volume. The cigar is medium-bodied, medium flavored. It’s a little unrefined and unbalanced. The white ash is flaky yet reasonably firm. The smoke time is two hours exactly, then it turned so bitter it had to be abandoned.

Would I buy this cigar again? I’m sorry but the answer is no

number88

Categories: 88, Costa Rican cigars, Skull 77, Tabacalera Vegas de Santiago | Tags: , , , ,

Siempre Sun Grown Toro

Siempre Sun Grown Toro. Earlier this year, I was approached by one of our contacts who’s working for a European cigar distributor. His question was if I ever heard of Dapper Cigar Company. And honestly, the answer was no. So I googled them, and the brand sparked my interest. They provide a lot of information about the blends on their website. As cigar media, that’s something we love. That cigar distributor decided not to take on Dapper Cigar Company. But another distributor in The Netherlands did, Kelch Trading introduced Dapper Cigars on the Dutch market.


The Siempre Sun Grown Toro sports a Sun Grown Sumatra wrapper from Ecuador. The binder is Connecticut Broadleaf from the United States. The filler comes from Honduras and three regions of Nicaragua. Those are Ometepe, Jalapa, and Esteli. On the website, Dapper Cigar Company even discloses the growers of the wrappers and some of the farms where the wrappers are grown. That kind of information is often hard to, or impossible, to find. The Siempre Sun Grown line was introduced in 2016.


The cigar looks great. The toothy wrapper is dark and oily. The triple cap is flawless. And the orange and gold ring just pops from that dark background. The cigar feels well constructed, we couldn’t find any plugs or soft spots on the touch. The aroma of the cigar is like charred wood and farmyard.


The cold draw is great. The flavors are meaty and earthy before the cigar is lit, with pepper on the tongue. Once lit, the cigar is earthy, spicy, and sweet. Add in some coffee, and that’s the flavor profile in the first puffs. The earthiness and pepper are the main flavors. And the flavors are meaty in mouthfeel. Slowly some spices and dry wood show up too. The pepper mellows out a little bit. Then suddenly it’s espresso with pepper and some citrus acidity. The pepper gets a bit stronger after a third, with a thick, creamy mouthfeel. There’s pepper, spices, wood, coffee, and earthiness. The pepper has a little bite every now and then. After two thirds, a leathery, peppery, cocoa flavor shows up as well. The cigar picks up in strength, power, and pepper. Then the coffee flavor returns as well.


The draw is good. The ash is a little dark though. The burn was alright, although it needed a touch up now and then. The smoke is medium thick and full. This cigar is balanced, although sometimes the pepper has a little bite. The cigar is medium to medium-full bodied and flavored. The smoke time is three hours

Would I buy this cigar again? Yes I liked it. It matched my profile.

number90

Categories: 90, Dapper Cigars, Nicaraguan cigars | Tags: , , , ,

Condega Serie F Maduro Robusto

The Condega brand was founded by Eduardo Fernandez. He came into the business in 1998 as a tobacco grower and years later he founded the brand Condega. The brand was particularly popular in Spain because of the price-quality point, but it was also sold in the United States. But since Fernandez, famous for his Aganorsa leaf, is more interested in growing tobacco than selling cigars, the brand never really took off outside of Spain. And that’s where the Spanish tobacco distributor Gesinta comes in. Their premium cigar division, Casa del Tabaco, purchased the brand from Fernandez for the international markets. In the last few years, the brand is quickly expanding distribution to other European countries, Africa, and the Middle East. Fernandez still holds the rights for Condega on the American market.


The Serie F Maduro only comes in one vitola. That’s the 5×50 Robusto. And it’s the only Condega cigar that isn’t a Nicaraguan puro. The Maduro wrapper comes from Mexico. It’s grown in the San Andres region. The binder and wrappers are all Aganorsa leaf from Nicaragua. The Condega cigars are known for their great price-quality point. In The Netherlands this cigar is 5 euro, in Germany, it’s even cheaper with a price tag of €4,70. And that for a Maduro robusto, packed in a box instead of a bundle.


The wrapper looks good, beautiful Maduro darkness. And it’s natural darkness, as you can see darker smears, it’s not evenly dark. The cigar looks well constructed, with a triple cap. It has the right amount of bounce when squeezed gently. There aren’t thick, ugly veins on the wrapper, so the cigar looks smooth. And the aroma is medium strong with stable, barnyard and wood smells.


The cold draw is smooth. The flavors are pepper, wood, and hay. Right from the start, the cigar is sweet with coffee, pepper, and earthiness. But without the bitterness that often comes with a strong coffee flavor at the beginning of a cigar. There’s a hint of spices too. And then suddenly a lot happens, wood, coffee, spices, pepper, sweetness, and hay. The mouthfeel is quite creamy. The flavors are smooth yet full. After that, the explosion of flavors mellows out, it’s now wood with some spices and a bit of pepper. Halfway the cigar gets very nutty, with sweetness and pepper. There are hints of grass and wood too, but those are faint. The creamy nuttiness is the dominant flavor. The mellow, creamy nuttiness continues to be the main flavor of the cigar, with wood and sweetness. There’s also a faint leather flavor as well.


The draw is great, just the right amount of resistance. The cigar is full-flavored, yet medium to medium full-bodied. The light-colored ash isn’t firm. The smoke could be a little thicker though, but just a bit. The burn had to be corrected once. The smoke time is two hours and thirty minutes. The cigar is well balanced, smooth and full of flavor.

Would I buy this cigar again? I want a box

number91

Categories: 91, Condega, Nicaraguan cigars, TABSA | Tags: , , , , ,

Skel Ton Robusto

A few months ago, we saw a picture of a cigar on Facebook. And that picture intrigued us. The ring of the cigar was the most unique we had seen in a while, and one of the best we had ever seen. It turned out that it was a cigar by a German aficionado, Tonio Neugebauer. He released the cigars in 2016. Ministry of Cigars published about the cigars last month. Neugebauer and Han Hilderink, owner of the Whisky & Cigar Lounge in Gronau, decided to send us a sampler. As cigar nerds, we are excited to smoke new cigars so here we go.


The cigars are made in Nicaragua, at one of the factories of Plasencia. The cigars are made with an H-Blend wrapper from Ecuador. Two binders are used, one from Indonesia and one from Nicaragua. And the filler comes from Honduras, Nicaragua and the Dominican Republic. There are only three sizes available. Those are a 6×44 Corona, a 5×54 Robusto, and a 6×52 Toro. For this review, we are smoking the 5×54 Robusto. The retail price is very reasonable at €6,90.


This cigar scores points on the looks. The ring is amazing, high-quality gold printing, a very detailed skeleton. And a cloth foot ring with the test ‘live your dreams’. 100 points for the ring alone. The wrapper looks great too, Colorado to Colorado Maduro in color. Evenly colored with thin, sharp veins. The cigar feels well constructed. The aroma is deep manure, earthy smell. It’s medium-strong.


The cold draw is perfect. The flavor in the cold draw is quite dry, dry cedar, hay, and raisin. The first puffs give me that dry flavor again, earthy, leathery with coffee. There’s also a pleasant, spiced sweetness and freshness which comes close to anise. To all changes to gingerbread spices with a mild sweetness and some citrus. Combined with cedarwood. The sweetness gets stronger, it’s like powdered sugar. The spices and the wood are still noticeable too. The mouthfeel is dry. After a third, it’s sweet coffee again. Halfway the flavors are a mix of leather, grass, spices and a little pepper. All with a pleasant dose of sweetness and a little citrus acidity. In the final third, the wood returns and it’s strong. With pepper and leather. But still smooth and balanced. Coffee returns too, all with sweetness and even a little custard creaminess. The gingerbread spices, pepper, sweetness, and wood are the dominant flavors in the last part of the cigar.


The draw is great. And the ash is white and firm. The burn is razor-sharp. The smoke is thick and white. This cigar is medium-bodied, medium to full-flavored with a pleasant smoothness. The flavors are balanced all the way through the cigar. The smoke time is two hours and twenty minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? I want a box

number92

Categories: 92, Nicaraguan cigars, Skel Ton, Tabacalera del Oriente | Tags: , , ,

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