Author Archives: cigarguide

PSyKo SEVEN Nicaragua Robusto

PSyKo SEVEN Nicaragua Robusto. That’s a long name. It’s the latest addition to the PSyKo SEVEN brand that already had the Psyko SEVEN, Psyko SEVEN Maduro, and the PSyKo SEVEN Connecticut. All of the blends are made in the Dominican Republic, except for the PSyKo SEVEN Nicaragua. For this cigar, Ventura Cigar Co. worked with the young and talented Indiana Ortez. She helped to blend the cigar and the cigars are made at her father’s factory in Condega, Nicaragua.


With that, the PSyKo SEVEN Nicaragua can really carry the Nicaraguan name. Especially when all the tobacco is Nicaraguan too. It’s not like some competitors that use the Nicaragua name for cigars made in other countries with little Nicaraguan tobacco, such as the new Camacho Nicaragua. The wrapper leaves for the PSyKo SEVEN Nicaragua are grown in a desflorado way. That means that the farmer chopped off the tobacco flower early on in the growing process. It is believed that the leaves will get more nutrients that way. And produce a stronger flavor.


The cigar has a huge ring, so you can’t really see the wrapper. The ring bears Indiana’s signature. There’s also some information about the blend on the ring. Once removed, a secondary ring is revealed. Again with Indiana’s signature and the PSyKo SEVEN logo. According to the description, this is a strong cigar. But the vintage 2007 wrapper doesn’t look strong. The color is quite light. The wrapper is slightly oily and smooth. The cigar looks good and feels good. The triple cap is perfect. The aroma is strong with hay and ammonia smells. Slowly green herbs, pepper, young wood, and grass show up as well.


The cold draw is good with a raw, nutty and raisin-like tobacco flavor. After lighting the cigar is slightly salty, with walnuts and leather. The mouthfeel is thick and sticky, yet not creamy. Soon after the cigar gets a nice balsamico vinegar sourness with leather and pepper. The mouthfeel is still thick, but a little creamy now. There’s also a little nuttiness. The cigar gets stronger and moves towards a pepper, nuts and wood flavor profile. There is still leather in the profile as well. Halfway the cigar gains more in strength. There is wood, leather, some earthiness, pepper and a hint of sweetness. Once the final third starts, the pepper becomes more pronounced and comes more to the forefront. The wood and leather are slowly pushing the nutty and earthiness away. The last part of the cigar doesn’t have any flavor changes anymore.


The draw is flawless. The smoke could be a little thicker though. The ash is coarse, yet firm. Pepper and salt colored. The burn isn’t perfect, it is a little uneven at times but corrects itself. This is an intriguing cigar with a unique flavor palate. Strong yet smooth. With enough evolution to keep it interesting. Nub worthy cigar that lasted for three hours.

Would I buy this cigar again? Yes I would

number91

Categories: 91, Nicaraguan cigars, PSyKo | Tags: , , , , | Leave a comment

Warped Eagles Descent Toro

Warped Eagles Descent Toro. Late last year, Warped announced a new cigar. That would be the Warped Eagles Descent. The cigar is to be expected this year, but in November the Hawaiian R. Field Wine Co. received an exclusive size for this cigar. R. Field Wine Co is an important cigar retailer in the state of Hawaii and had more exclusive cigars in the past. The Tatuaje Fausto is based on an R. Field Wine Co exclusive made by Pete Johnson for example. Trent Fermin of Fermin Cigars in Australia and Marvin Chang from R. Field Wine Co are friends. And so Chang offered Fermin a few boxes to be distributed in Australia.


The Warped Eagles Descent is made at the factory from Eduardo Fernandez. The factory is acclaimed and renowned. Fernandez is also known for his Aganorsa Leaf. The Tabacos Valle de Jalapa produces more cigars for Warped, but also for Illusione and many other highly rated brands. The brand new Gurkha Treinta also comes from TABSA, as the factory is called in short. For the Warped Eagles Descent, Warped owner and blender Kyle Gellis picked all Nicaraguan tobaccos. The exclusive size for R. Field Wine Co is 5⅝x52, that’s either a short Toro or a big Robusto.


The cigar looks tasty. A dark chocolate colored wrapper, smooth and oily. It feels silky. And the ring is detailed, dark but detailed. Black, orange and white, with a beautiful eagle. It’s almost the logo of a stylish, rugged jeans brand. The construction feels good, no plugs can be detected while gently squeezing the cigar. The aroma is quite strong. Barnyard, stable and spices are what come to mind.


The cold draw is good. The flavor in the cold draw is nothing by dry, spicy tobacco. Once lit, the cigar has a flavor of autumn leaves. Dried leaves with some soil and coffee bitterness. The flavors then turn to more spices. But the spices taste a little burnt, a little harsh. After a centimeter, the cigar gets more pepper and sweetness. But the spices are still around as well. The burnt sensation disappears, making the cigar more accessible. The soil, leafy flavor is getting stronger. And there is some leather and wood too. A nice nut flavor emerges. After a third, there’s coffee, soil, leather, dark wood, pepper, and some sweetness. Now and then a hint of vanilla can be tasted. The cigar becomes more pleasant with toast, vanilla, sweetness, and pepper. Almost like a peppery version of French toast. The next flavor change comes around the halfway point. Dry leather, wood, coffee, and pepper. With a dry mouthfeel. Slowly some salt comes into play as well.


The draw is phenomenal. And the smoke is great too. Thick, white and plentiful. The light gray ash is like a stack of dimes. The burn is razor-sharp. This medium to medium full-bodied cigar packs plenty of flavors. But it takes a while before it becomes good. The smoke time is three hours and fifteen minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? Nah, there are better Warped cigars out there.
number91

Categories: 91, Nicaraguan cigars, TABSA, Warped | Tags: , , , , , | Leave a comment

Daniel Marshall by Carlos Fuente – XXXVIII Limited Edition

Daniel Marshall by Carlos Fuente – XXXVIII Limited Edition. Earlier this year, Daniel Marshall announced a very special limited edition for his 38th anniversary. A cigar made for him by no other than Carlito Fuente, to honor their decades’ long friendship. As Marshall said “Carlos and I grew up together from boys to men sharing similar values, commitment to quality and an unrelenting quest for the best. What joins us together, the golden thread that runs through our veins and drives us to live our dreams is a commitment to creativity in all we do a richness of character and generosity of spirit.” Fuente called making the cigar a great honor and thanked Marshall for the opportunity. The cigar will be sold at 38 locations worldwide and is already highly sought after.

The cigar is a Dominican puro, with all tobaccos grown at Chateau de La Fuente. Some of the tobacco is aged up to 12 years. Marshall and Fuente did not reveal how many cigars are released. The cigar is only available in a 6⅜x52 Torpedo and comes in exclusive Daniel Marshall travel humidors. The humidors can carry up to 20 cigars but come with 8 of these limited edition masterpieces. As Carlos Fuente said “What a huge honor and privilege this project has been for me. It was a calling of the heart for a special friendship that I have cherished and appreciated for long before most anyone reading this knew anything about cigars. Thank you Daniel Marshall for being who you are and have been consistently all these many, many years.” Ministry of Cigars will add a thank you to Daniel Marshall for sponsoring this unicorn.

The cigar has a smooth, Clara colored wrapper. Silky and delicate. The torpedo is semi box-pressed and feels evenly filled. The cigar has two rings, a white and gold primary ring, with Marshall’s signature. The secondary ring is gold, but unlike many limited-edition rings, this is not a copy from Habanos. It’s gold with black and has a row of dots but that’s where the similarities stop. The font is different, the letters aren’t black. This ring is embossed, and much more upscale than the Habanos rings. You can see the effort and love poured into the design. The aroma is strong, deep spices such as cumin mixed with a barnyard aroma. Very pleasant, complex, and promising.

The cold draw is perfect, with a smooth leather flavor. From the start, there is honey with a slight citrus acidity, smooth leather, and a little earthiness. Add a little red pepper on the lips and you’ll get the flavor of this cigar. The honey sweetness remains, with wood, earthiness, pepper, spices, and some salt. The flavors already show complexity. Slowly coffee shows up as well, with some citrus again. The honey sweetness remains, just like cedarwood and pepper. Slowly the flavors turn more to cedar with white pepper. There is still some sweetness and citrus though, but more on the background with some coffee. The cigar slowly turns to more of a coffee-flavored cigar. But the flavor changes are very nuanced, very smooth, and very complexed. There is some sweetness, yet it is no longer honey but more like cane sugar. In the final third, there’s pepper with a smooth silky milk chocolate. The flavors are so smooth that even in the last third, retrohaling is not an issue. Cedar shows up on the palate again. Still with the milk chocolate and pepper.

The draw is phenomenal. The smoke is plentiful. It’s thick, it’s white, it’s voluminous. The light gray ash is firm, like a stack of dimes. And the burn? It’s straight. This is a medium-bodied and medium flavored cigar. But it’s balanced, complex, and smooth. This is a cigar best enjoyed in solitary. It deserves full attention. Experience as a cigar smoker and a good palate are required to fully ‘get’ this cigar. The smoke time is two hours and forty minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? I wish I could

Categories: 93, Daniel Marshall, Dominican cigars, Tabacalera A. Fuente y Cia | Tags: , , , , , | Leave a comment

Rauchvergnügen Gran Corona #64cm2

Rauchvergnügen Gran Corona #64cm2 . That 64cm2 is the cubic capacity of this gran corona from the Dominican Republic. The owners and founders of Rauchvergnügen are three German engineers, who combined their passion for engineering and cigars. They launched the brand in 2016, but last year they released their latest creation. A unique ashtray, 3D printed with the structure of a tobacco leaf. Ministry of Cigars wrote about the 42K ashtray before.


As for the cigar, there are several sizes of the Rauchvergnügen. And all have a number as size name. That number is the cubic capacity of that specific cigar. The cubic capacity of a 9¼x47 cigar is 64cm2. Therefore this cigar is named 64cm2. It’s made in the Dominican Republic, at Intercigar S.A. That factory is owned by another Western European. Maurice Koks, originally from The Netherlands, continued the family tradition of making cigars by moving to the Dominican Republic. His ancestors made cigars in The Netherlands. Together with the Rauchvergnügen guys, he blended this cigar with Ecuadorian tobacco as the wrapper. The binder is Dominican. For the filler, three tobaccos were selected, coming from Nicaragua, Dominican Republic, and Pennsylvania, USA.


The Colorado colored wrapper has a lot of thin veins, but that is unavoidable on a cigar this size. But it’s a fine-looking wrapper, slightly oily. The triple cap looks great. The cigar feels evenly filled as well. The aroma is spicy with hay. There are two rings on the cigar. Both blue, with the foot ring as a very thin one. It just says ‘Gran Corona’ with the Rauchvergnügen logo. The main ring is about an inch long. It says on the ring that the cigars are engineered to German standards.


The cold draw is a bit tight, but that could be the length. It’s spicy with a raw tobacco flavor. Once it, the cigar tastes like coffee with some sugar and a bit of spice. The flavor then turns to hay with a sweetness that is comparable to honey. There is a hint of chocolate in the flavors too. The flavors then change again to grass with sweetness and soil. The next change brings leather, more pepper, spice, and even a little cream. The leather and wood are gaining in strength, with more spice and pepper. In the second third, the leather is stronger with a hint of coffee and spice. There’s some sweetness as well. Halfway the cigar gets a walnut flavor as well, with coffee, leather, and spices


The draw is good, and that on a long, relatively thin cigar is a testament of a great roller. The ash is fine, salt and pepper colored. Relatively firm. The smoke is decent, both in thickness and in volume. The burn had to be corrected a few times, and due to the length, the cigar needed a few touch-ups. The cigar is medium-bodied, medium flavored. Smooth, well balanced, with enough evolution to keep it interesting. The smoke time is four and a half hours.

Would I buy this cigar again? I liked it, but the smoke time is too long.

number90

Categories: 90, Dominican cigars, Intercigar, Rauchvergnugen | Leave a comment

Punch Sir David Exclusivo Hong Kong

Punch Sir David Exclusivo Hong Kong. Sir David Tang is a legend in the world of the Habanos, especially in Asia. He is the founder of Pacific Cigar Company, the Habanos distributor for a large part of Asia and Oceania. He started PCC in 1992 and made Cuban cigars extremely popular all over Asia, and in Hong Kong specifically. So popular, that Cuba appointed Sir David Tang as the honorary consul for the Caribbean island in Hong Kong. He was also a Knight Commander of the Order of the British Empire and the French government honored him as Chevalier of the Ordre des Arts et des Lettres In August 2017, Sir David Tang passed away in London from liver cancer. Completely in his style, he planned a farewell party after doctors gave him only 2 months to live. But right before the party took place, his illness caught up to him and he passed. A year later, Habanos and PCC paid tribute to this remarkable man by releasing a regional edition for Hong Kong in his honor, the Punch Sir David.

 

The release consisted of 1200 cabinets of 50 cigars of his favorite brand Punch. And in a slightly shorter size than his preferred vitola, the Double Corona. The Punch Sir David is a Paco sized cigar, 7⅛x49, where the Punch Double Corona measures 7⅝x49. All the tobacco is grown, cultivated and curated in Cuba. 

 

The oily wrapper is Colorado colored. It has a few veins and rougher spots. But then again, it’s a long cigar, so it’s hard to get perfect wrapper leaves for double coronas. Since there is only so much tobacco in Cuba, the resources for these specific wrappers are scarce. The cigar feels evenly filled, yet a little under packed. The shape is good, the triple cap is great looking. The cigar has the regular Punch ring, and the famous red, silver and white exclusivo ring. But for this release, the ring had a crown with the name of Sir David, to commemorate him. The aroma is mild. A little wood with some ammonia is the smell of the cigar.

 

 The cold draw is a bit easy. With a salty raisin flavor. The salt is still there after lighting. But that’s not the only flavor. There’s hay as well, and leather. Slowly a fruity flavor and pepper show up too with a mild cedar. Some sweetness shows up too, with some grass and spices. Now that might all sound very flavorful, but the flavors are muted. They are there, but they are mellow and not outspoken. After half an hour, the cigar turns floral with a little harshness on the back of the throat. There’s also leather, soil, and some spices. The flavors come out of their shell a little more, they get more pronounced. At the end of the first third, the pepper grows and a hazelnut flavor shows up. In the second third, the cigars remain floral with pepper. There’s also some leather and spice. The flavors are no longer muted. The cigar gains strength as well, with a much stronger pepper over a floral base. The final third starts with cedar again, soil, leather, and pepper. The pepper slows down for a bit, before returning strong again. Some toast shows up too. 

 

The draw is good. The ash is light-colored and frayed. The smoke is fine and the burn is straight. The cigar is balanced and smooth. It’s a slow starter, with muted flavors in the beginning but it opens up. Medium-bodied turning into full-bodied and medium flavored turning into full-flavored. The smoke time is three hours and twenty minutes.

 Would I buy this cigar again? Too rich for my blood, but I would love to

number91

Categories: Cuban cigars, Punch (Habanos) | Tags: , , , , ,

Kafie 1901 Don Fernando Toro Bello

Kafie 1901 Don Fernando Toro Bello. Made at Tabacalera Kafie y Cia, one of the few remaining cigar factories in Honduras. Where there once were many factories in the Latin American country, only a few remains. Currently, there are less than 15 different factories still producing cigars in Honduras. Just to compare that, in and around Esteli there are over 100 factories large and small. Dr. Gaby Kafie left his full-time job as a physician in Florida to become a cigar manufacturer in his native Honduras. He and his team try to continue the cigar legacy of Honduras by preserving the cigar-making art.


The cigars are available in different sizes, but the one reviewed is the 6×54 Toro Bello. Other sizes available are a 5×50 Robusto and a 6½x52 Belicoso. There are also two 60 ring cigars, one 5 inches, and the other 6 inches in length. The Nicaraguan Cuban Seed wrapper is aged for 5 to 6 years before being used. The Honduran binder and the Nicaraguan and Dominican fillers are aged 3 to 4 years. Tabacalera Kafie is aging the tobacco at their factory warehouse.

The cigar looks good. A dark, smooth yet dry looking wrapper. But the triple cap looks a bit off, it’s like the torcedor used a different leaf for the second of the three caps, as it’s lighter than the rest. The glossy black and gold label is fine, print quality is good. Due to the size and color, the cigar looks impressive. While gently squeezing the cigar, not plugs or soft spots are detected. The aroma is strong, hay, stable, barnyard, those kinds of aromas.


The cold draw is great, with some sweet tobacco in the flavor. Once lit, the cigar delivers sweet coffee. The cigar then picks up in flavor and strength. Pepper, coffee, sweetness, and leather. The coffee is the strongest flavor, supported by the other mentioned flavors and citrus acidity. The flavors intensify, some mushroom and complex bitterness of dark chocolate are added. After a third, there is more wood, leather, and soil. The sweetness and citrus disappeared, but the coffee and pepper are still strong. Halfway the flavors are wood, leather, soil, and pepper with grass. The coffee makes a comeback, with dried leather and herbs. The final third starts with wood, leather and an unpleasant bitterness. The bitterness tones down, and makes place for spices and pepper. Coffee and some cocoa show up too.


The draw is great. The cigar produces a lot of smoke, thick and white. The burn had to be corrected once or twice. This cigar is flavorful, it has character and balance. The light-colored ash is semi-firm. This is a well balanced, rounded cigar with plenty of character. It’s full-bodied, full-flavored. The smoke time is three hours and twenty-five minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? Yes!

number91

Categories: 91, Honduran cigars, Kafie, Tabacalera Kafie y Cia

La Madrina Robusto

La Madrina Robusto. A cigar made for the American cigar company Dapper Cigar Company. A Fresno based cigar company founded in 2013. The La Madrina line, which is available in a robusto, toro, and corona Gorda size, was released in 2017. Strangely enough, the robusto is larger than the toro, yet the toro is thicker. When Ian Reith founded Dapper Cigar Company, he just wanted to make one great cigar. Just for himself and his friends. But the demand went up, and now there are several lines in the Dapper Cigar Company portfolio, including this La Madrina.


The La Madrina Robusto looks like a toro, because of the length of 5⅝. And in fact, it’s longer than the 5¼ Toro. Yet the ring gauge of the Robusto is the regular 50, compared to the 54 of the Toro. Dapper Cigar Company gives very detailed information about the blend on their website. They name the country, type of tobacco, the grower, and in most cases even the farm. So for La Madrina, we know that the filler comes from Esteli and Jalapa in Nicaragua, Pennsylvania in the USA, and from an undisclosed farm in the Dominican Republic. The binder comes from San Andres, Mexico. The wrapper is Habano seed from Ecuador, from a farm called La Luchita.

The cigar looks a bit dry. It is Colorado to Colorado Maduro in color. Beautifully shaped with a nice leather look. The construction feels good with an evenly filled cigar. The ring is gorgeous, glossy black with a red rose in a skeleton hand. Simple, unique and classy. The cigar has a strong aroma of manure.


The cold draw is great. The cigar has a dried grass flavor with white pepper in the aftertaste. Once lit the cigar gives coffee with toffee sweetness. The aftertaste is pepper. Very subtle there are some spices and a little grass too. But mellow, subtle. The spice and pepper are getting a bit stronger and more pronounced, while the coffee is replaced with leather. The toffee sweetness is gone as well. The flavors remain mostly the same. Pepper and spices, with some sweetness, some leather, and some wood. The final third starts with a strong leather flavor. The cigar gets way more interesting now. Leather, wood, pepper, spices with some sweetness and some mild citrus. The wood, leather, pepper, and spices are the strongest in the last few puffs and the mouthfeel is quite dry.


The draw is great. The burn is straight. And the ash is a stack of dimes. The smoke is good. And the smoke has a very pleasant aroma. The cigars lack evolution for the first two thirds. But the last third makes up for it. It’s a medium-bodied, medium flavored cigar. The smoke time is two hours and thirty-five minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? If it was a few euros cheaper

number89

Categories: Dapper Cigars, Nicaragua American Cigars S.A., Nicaraguan cigars

Muestra de Tabac Trifecta Brazilian Mata Fina & Sumatra

Muestra de Tabac Trifecta Brazilian Mata Fina & Sumatra. That is a long name for a very unique cigar. So unique that Tabac Trading Company has a patent-pending. The owner of Tabac Trading is Patrick Potter, who grew up in a tobacco store. His grandfather owned the original Tinder Box. Five years ago, in 2015, Potter decided to start a cigar company and traveled over Latin America to learn from experienced blenders. He has seen farms in every country, learned all about fermentation, characteristics of the tobacco and how to blend them together. And with his creativity, he developed the Trifecta line.


There are three different blends in the Trifecta series. For this review, we decided to go for the Brazilian Mata Fina & Sumatra. That’s the one with the green label. This perfecto can be smoked from both sides. The ring is mirrored, so it looks right from whatever side you smoke it. One side has a Sumatra wrapper, the other side has a Mata Fina wrapper. The binder is viso from Cameroon. The fillers all come from Nicaragua, where this cigar is produced.


The cigar looks odd. The shape, the ring that can be read upside down and the two-tone wrapper. The biggest part of the cigar has a darker colored wrapper, rough so that must be the Mata Fina. The other side has a smoother oily wrapper, which is the Sumatra. It would have looked nicer if the ring was exactly in the middle, and both wrappers would have an equal part of the cigar. But the idea is very cool. There is no cap, both sides are open. The cigar feels well constructed, although both ends feel a little soft. There is a strong barnyard aroma to this cigar. The ring is golden with the Tabac Trading Co logo on it and then two green stripes on the side. The stripes have the word Trifecta on it, mirrored. The design could be a little better, less plain, more exciting.


The cold draw is good. The cigar has a bit of dark chocolate, but also a sourness in the flavor profile before being lit. The call was made to light the Sumatra part of the wrapper. The cigar tastes like coffee, sugar, dried leaves and herbs. The sweetness is like powdered sugar. The leaves are slowly growing in strength just as the green herbs. A little musky, nutty flavor shows up too, with a buttery, thick mouthfeel. The nut flavor becomes more pronounced over the spicy herbs from the Cameroon binder. There is a good dose of pepper in the flavor profile too. Right before the change of the wrapper, the cigar gets a nice chocolate flavor, with nuts, spices, leather, and pepper. The mouthfeel is creamy again. As expected the cigar gets sweeter once the Brazilian Mata Fina wrapper starts burning. The cigar remains to be balanced, but the balance isn’t as good as with the Sumatra wrapper. The pepper is getting stronger with the sweetness. The nuttiness returns, but not as strong as before. Pepper is overpowering all other flavors.


The draw is fine. The smoke is thick and plenty in volume, above average. The light-colored ash is firm. The burn needed to be corrected a few times. The cigar is medium-full bodied, medium-full flavored as well. The smoke time is two and a half hours.

Would I buy this cigar again? Yes

number89

Categories: 89, Muestra de Tabac, Nicaraguan cigars | Tags: , , , ,

Gurkha Treinta Toro

Gurkha Treinta Toro. This cigar was released late 2019 to commemorate the 30th year since Kaizad Hansotia bought the Gurkha brand for $300 while on vacation. He noticed a man rolling cigars under the Gurkha name and selling them. He bought a few, loved them and offered to buy the brand. For just 300 US dollars he got the name and the rest is history. From that, he built a brand that is loved and hated in equal parts. Some swear by Gurkha, others hate the brand with a passion. But everybody has an opinion about Gurkha cigars, there is no in-between.

For the Gurkha Treinta, Hansotia worked with Aganorsa Leaf and the cigars are rolled at Aganorsa’s TABSA factory. That factory produces a lot of great private labels and is highly respected in the cigar community. The cigar utilizes an Ecuadorian Habano Rosado wrapper. The fillers and the binder are from Nicaragua. The binder is an Aganorsa Corojo 99. The fillers come from Esteli and Jalapa and include Criollo 98 and Corojo 99. The Toro is 6×54 in size.

The cigar looks good. The Habano Rosado wrapper doesn’t look oily but has a nice deep color with a reddish glow to it. There are a few thin veins. The cigar feels well packed. The white and gold ring features the Gurkha logo on the ring but is quite modest for a Gurkha cigar. The aroma is deep, manure and dark wood. It’s medium-strong in smell.

The cold draw is on the loose side. The cigar has a dry and slightly spicy tobacco flavor. From the start, the cigar has grass, coffee, leather, wood, and pepper. But all nicely balanced, although there is a little harshness on the back of the throat. But not unpleasant though. There is some nutmeg too. The cigar then turns smooth with lots of spices and a little wood and leather. Slowly some cocoa flavor shows up on the background as well. The flavors are smooth, it’s easy to retrohale this cigar. The second third starts with that beautiful mix of spices, some sweetness, hay, leather, and soil. The mouthfeel is creamy. Slowly there’s a toasted flavor that starts to emerge underneath the spices. The toast is becoming stronger, with more wood and still those nice, balanced mix of spices, pepper, and sweetness. In the final third, the flavors intensify. Still leather, wood, spices, and pepper but stronger. The finale is a little darker in flavor, more soil, wood and leather, fewer spices.

The draw is a little loose, but still within margins. The ash is white, dense and firm. It’s a stack of dimes. The smoke is good in volume and thickness. The burn is razor-sharp. This cigar is well balanced, smooth, and very pleasant. The cigar is medium-bodied, yet full-flavored. The smoke time is two hours and fifty minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? Yes

number91
Categories: 91, Gurkha, Nicaraguan cigars, TABSA | Tags: , , , , ,

San Pedro de Macoris Nicaragua Corona

San Pedro de Macoris Nicaragua Corona. Royal Agio Cigars has a factory in the Dominican Republic. In San Pedro de Macoris. And to pay tribute to the home town of their factory, and all the hard-working employees, the created a line bearing that name. It’s set up as a budget-friendly line with different blends. Currently, there are four. San Pedro de Macoris Ecuador, Brazil, Sun Grown, and Nicaragua.


On our recent visit to Royal Agio, we had the opportunity to take the San Pedro de Macoris Nicaragua Corona for a review. This cigar is made with Dominican and Brazilian fillers. The binder is Dominican. The wrapper comes from Nicaragua, as the name of the cigar suggests. The cigar measures 5⅞x42 and retails in Germany for only €3,70

The cigar is okay looking. A Colorado brown wrapper, slightly leathery. Not the smoothest, but also not the ugliest wrapper out there. The ring is nice, matte black with blue and silver. Clean, clear. The cigar feels good, it’s evenly spongy everywhere. There is a very mild aroma of damp hay.


The cold draw is fine. The flavors from the cold draw are mild, almost nonexisting. There’s a faint tobacco flavor. Once lit, there is more flavor. Dry coffee with spices, leather, and leaves. Slowly more spices show up. Cinnamon, nutmeg, those kinds of flavors. With pepper on the background and aftertaste. Sweet yet peppery gingerbread with a hint of hay is the next flavor pattern. The mouthfeel is dry but creamy. After a third, the gingerbread is still there with the pepper. But now with toast and leather. There is some harshness in the second part too though, a bitterness. The final third is more peppery, with wood, spices and more bitterness.


The draw is on the easy side of good. Still acceptable but a little more resistance would have been nicer. The light gray ash looks like stacked dimes. The smoke is thick and good in volume. The cigar is smooth, balanced. It doesn’t have a lot of character, but enough to be a pleasant smoke. The burn is straight. The smoke time is one hour and thirty-five minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? Once in a while.

number88

Categories: 88, Agio Caribbean Tobacco Company, Dominican cigars, San Pedro de Macoris

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