Cigars by brand

Cimarron Connecticut Robusto

Cimarron Connecticut Robusto. In 2018, Tabacalera El Artista released the Cimarron. And not just in one blend, but in three. Once with a Connecticut Shade wrapper, one with a Maduro wrapper. And a third one, with a Habano wrapper exclusively for Germany. Recently, a soft box-pressed toro was launched as a Dominican exclusive. Ram Rodriguez, the third generation to work at Tabacalera El Artista, was heavily involved in the blending process. And as he is not a fan of Connecticut Shade tobacco, blending the Connecticut version was hard to do. In a Zoom conversation, Rodriguez said he feels like he succeeded. And that the Cimarron is a Connecticut Shade blend that is suitable for the smokers that don’t like Connecticut Shade wrappers. That includes me, I dislike Connecticut Shade with a passion.

Tabacalera El Artista is around since 1965, but most of the time, they have been on the background. Going and trading tobacco, making private labels, and no-name bundle cigars. But the last few years, Tabacalera El Artista is coming in strong with great blends under their own brands. And as tobacco growers, they are innovators. The filler of the Cimarron uses T13 tobacco, a hybrid. Created by Tabacalera El Artista. The company is also responsible for bringing back Negrito, an old tobacco variety. It was very popular in the mid-1900s but lost popularity. Ram Rodriguez brought it back as a tribute to his grandfather. Tabacalera El Artista uses Dominican Negrito in many of its blends. The wrapper on this 5×54 Robusto comes from Honduras, which is different from Ecuadorian or American Connecticut Shade.

The wrapper is quite dark for a Connecticut Shade. It has a thin, long, vein on the side. The classic looking ring is clean and clear. White, green, and gold are a color combination that works well. The cigar has a beautiful triple cap and feels well constructed. The aroma is medium strong, the aroma is that of a freshly cut down apple tree mixed with straw.

The cold draw is fine with a mild wooden flavor. Once lit, the cigar has a spice, oak, sweetness, but also a little bit of that old book Connecticut flavor. The cigar does have some bitterness that is classic Connecticut Shade as well, but all the while it’s creamy too. There are pepper, cedar, and leather. The sweetness is almost marzipan like. Halfway the first third, there is a slightly nutty flavor as well. After a third, the cigar is woody with nuts, some sweetness, soil, and leather. Halfway, the nuttiness of the flavors is enough to fool the smoker into thinking it’s a Corojo wrapper. There is no sign of the classic Connecticut profile, just a nice and spicy nuttiness that fits more into a Corojo profile. The final third is a beautiful mix of different woods, soil, leather, and nuts. The pepper is still there but balanced and on the background. The finale is peppery and strong.

The draw is fine while the smoke is thick and nice. The burn is straight. The grayish ash is firm. The cigar is medium in both body and flavor. There is a nice evolution in the cigar. All along with the cigar, there is a little roughness that gives the mildness some edge. Without that roughness, the cigar would be boring. The smoke time is three hours and thirty minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? It’s one of the few Connecticut’s I enjoyed.

Categories: 90, Cimarron, Dominican cigars, Tabacalera El Artista | Tags: , , , , | Leave a comment

Diamond Crown Julius Caeser Toro

Diamond Crown Julius Caeser Toro. A cigar created to honor and commemorate Julius Caeser Newman. The Eastern European immigrant that started J.C. Newman Cigar Company in 1895. The company is still going strong, with the fourth and fifth-generation now in charge. It’s the oldest, still existing cigar brand in the United States. J.C. Newman makes cigars in Tampa, Florida, and Esteli, Nicaragua. The Dominican cigars from J.C. Newman, including those Diamond Crown Julius Caeser are made at Tabacalera A. Fuente y Cia. Fuente and Newman have a long-lasting relationship. Not only a working relationship when it comes to cigar production. The companies also work together for distribution and charity. The Cigar Family Charity Foundation is the brainchild of Carlito Fuente and the brothers’ Eric & Bobby Newman.

In 2010, the Newman family released this line. With Dominican filler and binder, wrapped in an Ecuadorian Havana wrapper. There are several sizes available, but the sampler that Bobby Newman gave Ministry of Cigars contained this 6×52 Diamond Crown Julius Caeser Toro. If you think that Julius Caeser is written wrongly, you are right and wrong. When the young Newman came to the USA as an immigrant, immigration officers wrote his name incorrectly. Newman never corrected it, and he was known as Julius Caeser for the rest of his life. And for decades after, due to the family heritage and the cigar line carrying his name.

The cigar has an oily, Colorado Maduro colored wrapper. There are some veins. It’s clearly a sun-grown wrapper. Not just the color gives it away, but also the texture and the veins. The ring is Roman Empire inspired with columns and an image of an emperor with a golden wreath. Now it’s the question, is the emperor on the ring Julius Caesar or an image of Julius Caeser Newman, the founder of the J.C. Newman Cigar Company? The cigar feels well constructed. The aroma is strong, vegetal, and earthy.

The cold draw is spicy, peppery, and full of flavor. After lighting, there is a salty, earthy coffee flavor. The same flavors show up in the retrohale as well, but with a little cedar as a bonus. There is a little spice, which comes close to paprika. Very unique and something we never tasted in a cigar before. Slowly the cigar moves to nutty tones, with ground black pepper, leather, and earthy flavors. The earthy flavors are starting to dominate the palate, with pepper as its main accomplice. But the pepper isn’t overpowering, it’s balanced. But after a few puffs, the flavors change to wood. There is a lot of dynamics in the first part of the cigar. The cigar mellows out after that, not in flavor strength, but in dynamics. The wood flavor is the main flavor, with pepper, spices, earthiness, and leather as supporting flavors. After the first third, some dried grass shows up as well. Later on, there is also some citrus and sweetness to go with the previously mentioned flavors. As well as very faint milk chocolate. Cedar gets more pronounced in the retrohale. At the beginning of the final third, the flavors change to leather with pepper, spice, and still that earthiness. The finale sees a lot of pepper.

The draw and the burn are both great. The right amount of resistance, and a very straight burn. The smoke is decent, it could have been a bit thicker though. The salt and pepper colored ash is firm. The cigar is balanced. It’s a medium to full-bodied cigar, full-flavored. Bold almost. The smoke time is three hours exactly.

Would I buy this cigar again? I like it a lot but it’s too expensive for a regular smoke.

Categories: 92, Diamond Crown, Dominican cigars, Tabacalera A. Fuente y Cia | Tags: , , , , | Leave a comment

My Father Fonseca Robusto

My Father Fonseca Robusto. A Nicaraguan Fonseca, only available in the United States and possibly the Dominican Republic. Because the trademark that My Father Cigars acquired from Quesada Cigars in December of last year is only valid there. Cubatabaco owns the trademark for the Fonseca brand in the rest of the world. And now the new cigar is released. It’s highly anticipated, as My Father Cigars has been making fantastic cigars for years. The company won the Cigar Aficionado Top 25 list twice in the last decade. Not many companies can say that.

The new blend is all Nicaraguan. And all the tobacco comes from the farms of the Garcia family. The wrapper is a shade-grown Corojo ’99 Rosado variety. For this review, I smoked the 5¼x52 Robusto. Other sizes available are a 5½x54 Belicoso, 5⅜x42 Cosacos, 4¼x40 Petit Corona, 6×55 Toro Gordo, and a 6¼x52 Cedros. The last one is wrapped in cedar. The Cosacos come with the iconic Fonseca wax paper. The brand is 130 years old, but since the Cuban revolution, there are two versions. One Cuban, owned by Cubatobaco for the international markets. And one new world version for the American market. Fun fact is that Don Francisco Fonseca, the founder of the brand, moved to New York and became an American citizen in the early 1900s while still operating the factory in Cuba.

The cigar looks great. The ring is fantastic. The designers managed to merge the iconic Fonseca logo and the style that My Father Cigar uses perfectly. It is detailed, beautiful, and printed on high quality. It’s immediately recognizable as both a My Father Cigars product and Fonseca. The wrapper is smooth and oily. The cigar feels well constructed. The aroma is surprisingly floral with hints of wood.

The cold draw is very good. Mild spicy with wood. Once lit, the cigar gives coffee, spice, wood, and soil. With a little bit of citrus acidity and sugary sweetness. There are some cinnamon and nutmeg in the retrohale. Soon the Corojo wrapper starts to release the signature nut flavor, with wood, pepper, and leather. There is still a little sweetness that balances everything out. After a third, the spice mix is almost like gingerbread. With wood, leather, and a little bit of nuttiness. The cigar has a nice spice sweetness undertone all along. Not sugary sweetness, but more the sweetness you get with cinnamon rolls, without tasting like a cinnamon roll. Halfway the cigar gets a little darker flavor profile, with more oak. The pepper slowly grows to that classic, strong pepper that made the Don Pepin Garcia cigars so popular and famous. The final third is more wood, even with some barbecue flavor, and pepper. Making it a great cigar to smoke during or after a barbecue.

The draw is fantastic. The cigar produces a lot of smoke. Thick, white smoke. The ash is light-colored and dense. The burn is straight and slow. The cigar is very balanced, smooth yet with plenty of character. The cigar starts out medium but slowly grows to full-bodied. It’s full-flavored. The smoke time is two hours and thirty minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? I want boxes, boxes, and boxes.

Categories: 94, Fonseca, My Father Cigars, Nicaraguan cigars | Tags: , , , , | Leave a comment

Muestra de Saka Nacatamale

Muestra de Saka Nacatamale. A beautiful 6×48 Gran Corona from Dunbarton Tobacco & Trust. And if that name doesn’t ring a bell, Steve Saka will probably do. If Steve Saka doesn’t ring a bell, then you seriously need to upgrade your cigar knowledge. Saka was the first cigar blogger. Then he became a marketing consultant for J.R. Cigars, CEO for Drew Estate, and for a few years, he’s the owner, blender, and the face of Dunbarton Tobacco & Trust.

This Muestra de Saka Nacatamale is the second cigar in the Muestra de Saka line. And the first regular production, as the inaugural cigar was a limited edition. Named after a traditional Nicaraguan dish. It’s not the last time that Saka named a cigar after food though. The filler tobacco is all from one farm in Jalapa, Esteli. Add a Nicaraguan binder and an Ecuadorian Habano wrapper and you have the ingredients for this cigar. Made in Esteli, at Joya de Nicaragua. This cigar was a gift from Puros Asia, the Malaysian distributor for Dunbarton Tobacco & Trust.

The first thing that catches the eye, after it’s taken out of the coffin, is the lack of a cigar ring. The Muestra de Saka Nacatamale has a cloth foot ring. Include the coffin, and this is something that stands out in a humidor. Fluorescent yellow with red letters spelling Muestra de Saka, and black letters Nacatamale printed over the red letters. The wrapper is oily, yet has some veins. The dark color isn’t even everywhere, it’s lighter around the veins. But that makes this cigar intriguing. The cap has a little tail, but it’s no flag tail or pigtail. Just a little 2-millimeter tail. The construction feels fantastic. And the aroma is delicious, dark, spicy, and intense.

The cold draw is flawless with a spicy taste. Once it, it’s dark roast coffee with some red chili and sweetness. The flavors turn to grassy, nutty, spicy, and leathery. There is an earthy cinnamon flavor with some pepper, well blended and balanced. The coffee returns, and there is slight dark chocolate. The retrohale has a mildly sweet and mild spice flavor, close to nutmeg. The second third starts earthy with coffee. The smooth spices, with a little pepper, dominate the cigar. There is also some earthy chocolate. The final third has dark flavors, some oak, leather, spices, some black pepper. There is also a hint of sweetness and freshness. The oak gets stronger, with roasted tones. Roasted coffee returns as well. The finale has a little more black pepper.

The draw is fantastic. The smoke is almost Drew Estate like. Thick, full, white, and plentiful. The light-colored, almost white, ash breaks easily though. It’s so well balanced and so smooth that it doesn’t feel like a medium to a full-bodied cigar. But it is though, and it’s also full-flavored. The smoke time is two hours and forty minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? Hell yeah

Categories: 93, Fabrica de Tabacos Joya de Nicaragua, Muestra de Saka, Nicaraguan cigars | Tags: , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Umnum Honduras Robusto

Umnum Honduras Robusto. A strange name for a cigar that’s gaining traction in Europe. Handmade cigars, from Nicaragua or Honduras depending on the blend. And dirt cheap. This robusto has a price tag of €2,30 in Germany, making it one of the cheapest handmade cigars on the market. Where the name Umnum comes from, we have no idea. Google didn’t tell us anything. The only umnum we found is a tiny village in the West Papua province of Indonesia. But that region is too cold to grow tobacco, and only the Nicaragua blend uses some Indonesian tobacco.

There are two blends. The first one is a Nicaraguan puro. I reviewed the Umnum Nicaragua Bond some time ago. The second blend is the Umnum Honduras. It’s made at an undisclosed factory in Honduras. The wrapper is Honduran with a Mexican binder. The filler tobaccos are from Nicaragua and Honduras. The robusto measures 5×50 but there are several other sizes available. From a Petit Corona called Bond to a 4¾x60 Jumbo and a few more in between.

The cigar doesn’t look like a cheap cigar. The ring is beautiful. Matte Black with a shiny copper-colored logo of a traditional image, probably Mayan. The wrapper itself is Colorado colored and has the looks of Corojo. Dryish, with the feel of fine sandpaper. The veins are thin. The cigar feels well constructed. The aroma is medium strong. It has forests smell with a hint of something like old urine. It’s not the most pleasant aroma we ever experienced, but also not the worst.

The cold draw is fine but has that dried dusty flavor of Connecticut Shade. Once lit there is a strong coffee flavor, slightly acidic. The flavor is a little rough around the edges. The coffee and acidity remain, but now with some sweetness, dried leaves, and musty wood. At the end of the first third, the cigar has a very unpleasant flavor. The sour flavor is ruining everything else. The second third is musty, dried leaves, and a little harsh. The acidity is still there but at a tolerable level. There is a bit of a burned wood and nuts flavor as well. The final third starts with peanuts. The acidity is completely gone. There is a bit more sweetness. The cigar completely changes from bad to great. A nice, balanced combination of black pepper, sweetness, leather, wood, coffee, and nuts. 

The construction is great. The draw, the burn, and the smoke are of high quality. Straight burn, although we had to correct it once, halfway. Thick, white smoke. Good draw. White ash. The flavors are medium to full. But not well rounded, too acidic. But the last third is a game-changer. It’s day and night. The smoke time is three hours fifteen minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? Based on the first and second third, no. Based on the final third, yes.

Categories: 89, Honduran cigars, Umnum | Tags: , , , ,

Diesel Whisky Row Robusto

Diesel Whisky Row Robusto. Who owns Diesel Cigars is a bit of a mystery to most cigar enthusiasts. Despite popular belief, it is not a brand from A.J. Fernandez although Fernandez is the manufacturer responsible for the brand. But the brand isn’t in the hands of A.J. Fernandez, it’s just blended by his skillful hands. And the production takes place at his factory in Esteli, Nicaragua. The owner of Diesel cigars is Scandinavian Tobacco Group, through Meier & Dutch. STG is the parent of General Cigars, Cigar.com, Cigarsinternational.com Thompson.com, Cigarbid.com, and more. Last year, they acquired Royal Agio as well. Meier & Dutch is a wholesale company that operates under the STG umbrella. The original Diesel Unholy Cocktail was only available at STG owned internet retailers in the past.

The Diesel Unholy Cocktail is so popular that the Diesel brand spawned into a whole series. And not exclusive through the STG stores anymore, but everywhere. Some lines even made it across the ocean to Europe. For the Diesel Whisky Row, the Diesel brand and Rabbit Hole distilleries collaborate. Rabbit Hole distilleries, a bourbon manufacturer, sends used barrels to A.J. Fernandez. Fernandez uses those barrels to age Mexican San Andres leaves. He uses them as a binder under an Ecuadorian Habano wrapper. For the filler, he uses aged Nicaraguan tobacco from Jalapa, Condega, and Ometepe. Ministry of Cigars reviews the 5½x52 Robusto.

The first thing that makes this cigar stand out is the shape of the ring. It’s big and diagonally placed over the cigar. But then there is a partially round part as well. Pastel blue, brown, and gray. It has the Diesel logo and the Rabbit Hole Bourbon logo. The foot ring is big as well that says that the cigar is bourbon barrel-aged and it has the names of both Diesel and Rabbit Hole prominently on the ring. The Colorado Maduro colored wrapper is smooth looking. Right below the head, there seems to be a softer spot. The aroma is strong, barnyard, and manure.

The cold draw is great. There is a bit of an alcohol taste in the cold draw, but that could be just a mind trick. There is some spice on the lips as well. Once lit, there is leather, wood, soil, and citrus acidity. There is also an alcohol flavor to the cigar, so the barrel aging does work. The barrel aging brings out more vanilla from the wood. There is a nice toasted flavor, floral, with wood, leather, nuts, and that alcohol right on the edge. Halfway there is also some nutmeg in the flavor profile, or is it cinnamon? Slowly the flavors change to wood, leather, and chocolate. All with that alcoholic mouthfeel and slight pepper. The sweetness returns, the pepper gains strength, and all on a base flavor of wood and leather.

The construction is great. A lot of thick white smoke. Beautiful light gray ash. A great draw and a straight burn. The cigar is smooth, well-rounded flavors. The cigar is medium to full in body, full in flavor. The smoke time is three hours and fifteen minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? On my next order

Categories: 91, Diesel, Nicaraguan cigars, Tabacalera A.J. Fernandez | Tags: , , , , ,

Bolivar Libertador Edición Francia

Bolivar Libertador Edición Francia. This cigar is released three times. First in 2006 as an edicion regional for France. A year later, another batch was released, also for the French market. This particular cigar hails from the second release. Those releases came in boxes of 10 or dress boxes of 25. The cigar that we smoke for this review comes from a dress box of 25. In 2013, the cigar returned as a semi-regular production but exclusively for the La Casa del Habano franchise stores. The La Casa del Habano version only comes in ten-count boxes though.

I was gifted this beautiful, fat cigar by a friend. We were smoking a cigar pairing it with Cohiba cognac by Martell at his beautiful home. He brought out a box of these beauties and said “why don’t you do a review of these”. A task we happily accepted. The 6½x54 Sublimes has a reputation, and we had never smoked one. So to be able to review a vintage version is an opportunity we could not pass.

The cigar looks good. A nice, evenly colored wrapper. Just one vein. But the wrapper looks dry. Not dry as in no moisture, but dry as in not oily. The triple cap is beautiful. The regular Bolivar ring, with the gold, yellow and brown looks good on the shade of the wrapper. As with most Cuban rings, the exclusivo ring and the regular ring don’t really match. The cigar feels quite hard. There isn’t a lot of aromas left after thirteen years of aging.

The cold draw is good. Lightly salty with a little bit of black pepper. Once lit, the salt and pepper are hardly noticeable. The cigar has a nice honey sweetness with leather. The flavor then turns to dry leather, sweetness, and cedar. Mellow and smooth, this cigar tells you it’s aged. The second third starts with a pronounced coffee flavor, with spices, leather, cedar, and honey. The flavors gain strength as well. The mouthfeel gets dry with coffee, earth, honey, and leather. The same flavors keep lingering around, one stronger than the other and then switching. The honey remains pronounced. Coffee keeps coming back, with leather. In the final third, the earthiness is getting stronger with some more spice and pepper. It has that typical flavor of an aged Cuban cigar that cannot be found in any other cigar in the world.

The draw is good. The light gray ash is pretty and quite firm. The flavors of the cigar are smooth and balanced. In the first third, it’s clear that this is an aged cigar. The cigar starts to show character in the second third, before that it was mellow at best. The smoke is now nice and thick. White and a good volume of smoke as well. This cigar starts mild and grows to medium-full. Both in flavor and strength. The smoke time is three hours and fifteen minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? Boxes with this age are impossible to find.

Categories: 91, Bolivar (Habanos), Cuban cigars, Partagas Factory | Tags: , , , , , , , ,

Gilberto Oliva Reserva Toro

Gilberto Oliva Reserva Toro. A tribute to the man who started the Oliva Cigar Company in Nicaragua in 1995. But that doesn’t mean that the family wasn’t in tobacco before. It all started with Melanio Oliva in 1886. Melanio Oliva, the family patriarch, grew tobacco in Pinar del Rio, Cuba. Gilberto, Melanio’s grandson, fled to Spain and later Nicaragua after the Cuban revolution and after his family’s plantations were taken from them by the thieving Cuban regime. In Nicaragua, he became a tobacco grower again. With his sons Gilberto, Carlos, and José, he created Oliva Cigars. In 2017, at age 86, Gilberto Oliva passes away. Ministry of Cigars was lucky enough to have sat down with this industry legend at the Tabolisa factory in 2014.

To honor their father, Jose, Gilberto Jr, and Carlos created the Gilberto Oliva Reserva line. In the same way, as they did with their great grandfather Melanio. For the Gilberto Oliva Reserva line, they turned to an Indonesian Sumatra wrapper. The binder is from Ecuador. The filler is Nicaraguan, with at least some but probably all coming from the Oliva family farms. Besides producing cigars, Oliva also grows tobacco in Esteli, Condega, and Jalapa. The Oliva Cigar Company is now part of the Belgian family-owned J. Cortes brand.

The cigar is quite good looking. A smooth and oily Colorado Maduro colored Indonesian Sumatra wrapper. At first glance, cigar smokers might not recognize this as an Oliva cigar. The classic logo with the big O is missing from the ring. Dark red, gold, and brown create a more classic looking logo. The construction feels immaculate. A nice triple cap finishes the look. The cigar has a mild spicy aroma.

The cold draw gives a bit more resistance than desired. After the cigar is lit, there is a beautiful mixture of sugar, grass, and dark spices. Full, rounded, smooth. Slowly a little pepper and leather show up too. Black pepper. The spice is a mixture of nutmeg and cinnamon. It is more pronounced in the retrohale. After a third, cedarwood shows up as well. The dark spices remain, with sweetness, and there is even a hint of vanilla. If there is any cigar that makes resembles Coca-Cola in a dry form, this is it. But better. Because there is also cedar, black pepper, and some earthy flavor. The Final third has all of the flavors mentioned above, with some citrus and floral flavors. These flavors remain until the end. Only the mouthfeel changes and becomes a bit dry.

The draw is good. The ash is white as ash can be, a sign of tobacco from potassium-rich soil. The burn is straight and slow. The smoke is thick. It’s white and there is a lot of it. This is a cigar medium in body yet full in flavor. Well balanced and very pleasant, yet the cigar could use a little more character. The smoke time is three hours and twenty minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? I want a box

Categories: Oliva, Tabacalera Oliva | Tags: , , ,

Oscar Superfly Maduro Super Corona

Oscar Superfly Maduro Super Corona. In 2019, Oscar Valladares released the Super Fly Maduro. A cigar inspired by the 1970s in style. Funky colors, bigger than life. A bold smoke, that came in a velvet lined box to further enhance that pimp look and feel of the line. Earlier this year, Oscar released another Super Fly line, with a Connecticut Shade wrapper.

Valladares says this is the strongest cigar he makes. It’s the first time he used Dominican tobacco in one of his blends. The wrapper comes from San Andres in Mexico. The binder is Honduran. The filler comes from Honduras, Nicaragua, and the Dominican Republic. Canteros, the New Zealand distributor for Oscar, sponsored Ministry of Cigars with this cigar. This is the 5¼x45 Super Corona. Other sizes available are 6×54 Super Toro and the 6½x60 Super Gordo

The cigar looks great. A very dark wrapper, slightly dry and leathery is the perfect match for the funky ring. The ring breathes 1970s funk and pimp. An unusual shape, shiny purple, and gold, typography from that era. This is a cigar to smoke while watching Shaft or any other blaxploitation movie from the 1970s. Or Jackie Brown, which is Tarantino’s tribute of blaxploitation. The cigar feels well constructed. The aroma is strong and woody.

The cold draw is flawless and releases some brown spices in the flavor profile. Dry spices, dry wood, and a mild cocoa flavor are the flavors that start the cigar. The cigar turns more to a dark chocolate flavor profile. With brown spices as supporting flavor. Some sugar sweetness shows up as well. With a hint of leather over the chocolate, earthiness, and wood. Wood, sweetness, and brown spices are the main flavors. After a third, the cigar is too strong to retrohale. The pepper in the nose is too strong. The wood and leather get more pronounced, the sweetness fades away. A little citrus acidity shows up to balance all flavors out.

The draw is great. The ash is as white as snow. The smoke is thick and plentiful. The burn is straight as an arrow. The cigar is medium-full bodied, medium-full flavored. To stay in the 70s mood, this cigar is dy-no-mite! It’s groovy, or the bomb. The smoke time is two hours.

Would I buy this cigar again? This cigar is so groovy, I want more.

Categories: 93, Honduran cigars, Leaf by Oscar, Oscar Valladares Tobacco Factory | Tags: , , , , ,

Muestra de Tabac Pennsylvania Connecticut Figurado

Muestra de Tabac Pennsylvania Connecticut Figurado. Earlier this year, Ministry of Cigars published a review of the Muestra de Tabac Brazilian Mata Fina & Sumatra. A thick perfecto with two wrappers. Not in a barberpole style, but half and half. The cigar is open at both sides, for the smoker to decide which side to smoke first. A patent-pending concept by Patrick Potter & Joey Febre from Tabac Trading Company. But it’s not the only blend using this concept. There are two more.

The blend we are reviewing today is the Pennsylvania & Connecticut Figurado. With on one side Pennsylvania Broadleaf. The other side is wrapped in Connecticut Shade. The filler and binder are Nicaraguan. This 5½x64 thick cigar. Patrick Potter is responsible for blending the cigar. It’s made at Tabacalera La Perla, a small Tabacalera in Esteli, Nicaragua.

Looking at the cigar, we are pleased that the Pennsylvania wrapped part of the cigar is a bit longer than the Connecticut Shade side. The comments on the ring remain the same. We love the idea that the ring can be read from both sides. Yet the idea could have been designed a little better. The Pennsylvania broadleaf looks manly and rough like broadleaf is supposed to look. It makes the Connecticut shade look even paler than it is. The shape is nice. The cigar feels good. No soft ends as with the Brazilian Mata Fina & Sumatra we reviewed before. The aroma is strong. A lot of spice, hay, soil, and barnyard.

The cold draw is fantastic. It delivers spice and pepper with a lot of hay. Immediately after lighting its spice, pepper, and soil that hits the palate. The classic Connecticut Shade mustiness is there, but faint and muted. Sweetness and dark chocolate bitterness replace the spice and pepper. The earthy flavor remains, but now with leather. The complexity and bitterness of the dark chocolate are delicious. There is still pepper on the top of the palate. Black pepper, and it’s growing in strength. The cigar loses some of the dark chocolate and turns more to hay with pepper in the final stages of the first third. The second third starts with that dark chocolate again, with pepper, leather, and wood. Once the cigar reaches the Pennsylvania wrapper, there is more black pepper. The flavors get a little rougher, yet also a little creamy. The intense dark chocolate flavor is a winner. A strong spice shows up too, almost like gingerbread. There’s also a faint hint of vanilla. The vanilla and cream disappear. Spices, pepper, leather, wood is what the cigar gives. With some salt in the finale.

The draw is fantastic. The burn is great too. The cigar produces plenty of smoke, although it’s a bit thin. The light-colored ash is fine. The cigar is balanced, the dark chocolate bitterness makes it complex and intense. This is a full-bodied, medium-full flavored cigar. The smoke time is three hours and fifteen minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? I want more!

Categories: 91, Muestra de Tabac | Tags: , , , ,

Create a free website or blog at WordPress.com.