Dominican cigars

Davidoff tasting cigar figurado

Davidoff tasting cigar figurado. Pre-release cigars or test blends leak into the hands of cigar enthusiasts from time to time. But the Davidoff tasting cigar figurado isn’t either of them. Yet, it is a cigar that is not for sale. Honestly, I don’t know the story behind this cigar. All we know is that it comes from Davidoff. The cigar doesn’t have a ring but the sticker on the cellophane is clearly Davidoff and says “tasting cigar, not for sale”.

Davidoff Distributors managing director Roy Sommer is a friend of me. And he is responsible for gifting this unique cigar. A cigar of which we know nothing. The blend is unknown and there is literally no information to find online. The Herics Cigar Tape is useful so that at least the correct size is known. 6¾x52 in a figurado shape.

The Colorado to Colorado Maduro colored wrapper looks a little rough for a Davidoff cigar. But then again, this isn’t a cigar for sale so aesthetics aren’t part of the deal. The cigar also lacks a ring. The shape is wonderful, with an almost closed foot and all capped head. This cigar comes from a skillful roller, that is for sure. The construction feels great. The strong aroma is Cubanesque. The manure and barnyard aroma that you would expect from a good, slightly aged Habanos cigar.

The cold draw is surprisingly good. It gives pepper and chocolate. One lit, those flavors are gone. A dry sweetness with hay is the flavor profile at the start of the cigar. The sweetness remains, but now with leather, coffee, and earthiness. Sweet licorice shows up as well. After a third, there is some pepper too. But the main flavor is still sweet licorice. The leather gets stronger, but still with a lot of sweetness. In the retrohale, cedar is noticeable. Halfway the sweetness mellows out. It is still there, but not as strong anymore. In the final third, wood is the dominant flavor. Wood with peanuts and sweetness.

The draw is amazing. The white ash is pretty but not very firm. The burn is straight and slow. The flavors are smooth, balanced, and well rounded. The tobacco is probably aged. The smoke is plentiful, thick, and white. The smoke time is two hours and forty-five minutes. The cigar is medium in body and flavor.

Would I buy this cigar again? Well, it is not for sale.

Categories: 91, Cigars Davidoff, Davidoff, Dominican cigars | Tags: , , | Leave a comment

Davtian Rubina Corona

Davtian Rubina Corona. One of the twelve cigars from Davtian Cigars. The company produces six lines in the Dominican Republic. Each line exists in two sizes. The Rubina is available in a Corona and a Petit Corona with the name The Queen. I reviewed Davtian Trinidad, Davtian Habana, and Davtian Primus before. Davtian is making cigars since 2011 when the Armenian entrepreneur David Davtian founded the brand.

This 6×46 Corona comes from Tabacalera El Puente. This 6×46 Davtian Rubina Corona is a Dominican Puro with a Habano 2000 Rojizo wrapper. The binder is Piloto Cubano Seco. For the filler, Davtian utilizes San Vicente Viso and Seco, Criollo 98 Viso, and Piloto Cubano Viso. Davtian cigars are available in Southern Africa, South East Asia, and some European markets including The Netherlands.

It is a good looking cigar. A Maduro colored wrapper, oily, but with a vein or two facing the front. A nicely shaped golden and black ring. The triple cap is a bit sloppy though. The construction feels good. There is a mild leather aroma coming from the cigar.

The cold draw is fine, with the right air resistance. There is a sweetness, some spice, leather, and hay in the cold draw. Quite a lot of flavors to taste in the cold draw. Once lit, the cigar gives mild chocolate, earthiness, coffee, and a hint of spice. Quickly followed by complex wood. The mouthfeel is sticky. Wood becomes the main flavor, with something grassy in the background. The mouthfeel changes to creamy. With some leather, wood, and soil. After a third, the main flavor is wood with a little nutmeg. The final third starts with a crisp wood flavor and strong pepper. Later on, leather joins the two flavors.

The draw is phenomenal. The ash is firm and light gray, almost tin-colored. The smoke is a little thin, although the volume gets more along the way. The burn is straight and slow. This cigar is medium-bodied, yet the flavor is medium-full. The smoke time is two and a half hours.

Would I buy this cigar again? No, this is not a cigar that fits my palate

Categories: 89, Davtian, Dominican cigars, Tabacalera El Puente | Tags: , , , ,

Buffalo Ten Maduro Toro

Buffalo Ten Maduro Toro. When the first rumors about this release surfaced, the name was a mystery. At first, the suggestion was made that it is a cigar for the Buffalo Cigar Festival. But in a conversation with Ram Rodriguez from Tabacalera El Artista, the truth was revealed. The name is chosen because it’s a cool sounding name. Of course, the people behind Buffalo Cigar Festival love the name, but they are not the inspiration. Rodriguez wanted to make a value cigar, one size, simple packaging, and simple artwork. The 10 in the name comes from the first proposed packaging. Bundles of 10 cigars. But eventually, the cigars were released in bundles of five cigars.

The cigar measures 6×52 and is box-pressed. Almost rectangle, much like the Factory Press from La Flor Dominicana. Very sharp edges. This is a five-country cigar blend, with a Mexican wrapper. A Maduro from San Andres. The filler comes from the Dominican Republic, Colombia, and the USA. The Colombian tobacco is used for the slightly acidic flavor, that helps to bind all flavors together. But the tobacco that is most rare is the binder. It’s a Dominican Negrito. Very dark tobacco that was popular 50 to 60 years ago. But it disappeared. Tabacalera El Artista and the Dominican Agricultural Society brought it back to life. It’s hard tobacco to grow, with relatively low yields. So it’s not used often.

The cigar looks amazing. Not just to smoke, but also to eat. The sharp box-pressed shape and the dark chocolate color make this cigar look like a candy bar. Add a simple, clean, and slick white ring and you have an amazing looking cigar. The wrapper is Colorado Maduro colored, with one flattened vein. It’s toothy and feels like fine sandpaper. The ring is white, simple, clean with print in the same color as the wrapper. The two components on itself look fine, yet the combination is extremely pleasing on the eyes. The box press is so sharp, it is almost as sharp as the La Flor Dominicana Factory Press cigars. The construction feels good. The aroma is earth and leather.

The cold draw is flawless. The flavor is earthy. Once lit, the cigar has coffee, soil, sweetness, and herbal spices. The flavors then change to soil, leather, chocolate, pepper, and spice. Leather gets stronger with cedar and pepper. The mouthfeel is dry. The second third starts with cocoa powder. Dry. Add some leather and a hint of acidity to bind everything together. The flavors slowly change to more leather, spices, soil, and wood. With still a hint of chocolate, pepper, and acidity. The final third starts with that dry chocolate or cocoa flavor again. Pepper, leather, and wood are there too. With a hint of sweetness. The mouthfeel is still dry now, but also sticky. There is a spice flavor that is hard to describe, with wood, pepper, and chocolate.

The draw is fantastic, the right amount of airflow and resistance. The burn is straight as an arrow. The cigar produces plenty of thick white smoke. The ash is almost white as well. Firm also. The cigar doesn’t have a lot of evolution. But it is balanced and flavorful. The Buffalo Ten Maduro Toro is a medium-bodied, medium flavored cigar. The smoke time is three hours and fifteen minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? A 92 rated cigar for a value price? Damn right!

Categories: 92, Buffalo Ten, Dominican cigars, Tabacalera El Artista | Tags: , , , , ,

VegaFina Fortaleza 2 Andullo

VegaFina Fortaleza 2 Andullo. A limited-edition release from VegaFina. Limited to little less than 5000 boxes of ten cigars. As the name suggests, it’s the second Fortaleza release for the 22-year-old brand. The brand was founded by Tabacalera, which was the Spanish tobacco monopoly. That’s why the brand is strong in Europe and not in the United States.

This cigar is named after a traditional fermentation process in the Dominican Republic. Andullo. That’s when tobacco is rolled up in tubes very tightly. That’s how the tobacco gets fermented. This is different than the regular fermentation using pilones. The wrapper is Ecuadorian Sumatra. The rest of the tobaccos are all Dominican, including some Andullo. The same kind of fermentation is practiced in Indonesia under the name Tambolaka. And in the Amazon, CAO Amazon Basin utilizes some of that tobacco.

The cigar is good looking. A nice Colorado colored wrapper, thin yet sharp. The simple matte black ring with the glossy VF logo in red. Add a handwritten font Andullo in white, and you have a contemporary ring. The construction feels good. The cigar has a very pleasant aroma. Hay with chocolate.

The cold draw is flawless. With spices and herbs as flavors. After lighting the cigar releases flavors of grass, dirt, cinnamon with dry leather. Lots of dry leather. Some hay and acidity show up too. Vinegar, and a little too sour. Normally a little acidity brings flavors together, this is just a little too sour. Not much though. The mouthfeel is dry, the acidity works well with the spices. Spices like nutmeg and cumin. And then a peanut flavor shows up. Unusual flavor for cigars, but deniable peanuts. With some white pepper. The acidity is still there, but now in a way that it enhances the flavors instead of overpowering them. The peanut flavor gets stronger, with some spices and pepper. In the final third, it’s peanuts, powdered sugar, and dry leather. It creates a dry mouthfeel. The flavors remain peanuts, sweetness, spicy with some acidity to bind it all together. In the finale, there is an even more unusual flavor. Something that we haven’t discovered in 15 years of cigar smoking. Fried egg. With peanuts, leather, and pepper.

The draw is fine, and the smoke is thick, white, and plentiful. The burn is beautiful. The white ash is firm. The cigar is medium-bodied and reasonably smooth. Although there is some roughness in the second third of the cigar, it’s minor. It’s a medium-full bodied cigar with plenty of flavors. The smoke time is three hours and fifteen minutes.

Would I buy these again? With such limited stock, that might be impossible.

Categories: 91, Casa de Garcia, Dominican cigars, VegaFina | Tags: , , , ,

Casa Cuevas Reserva Maduro Toro

Casa Cuevas Reserva Maduro Toro. A cigar that as far as we know is only available in the United States, New Zealand, and the Dominican Republic. And it’s a relatively new brand yet not a new family. The Cuevas family is growing tobacco and making cigars for decades. Since 1890 to be exact. In the early 2000s, the Casa Cuevas brand was sold for a while. But then the family returned to making cigars for others. Until 2016, when the Casa Cuevas line returned. In a way, the story of the Cuevas family is similar to the El Artista brand and even Plasencia. All three are around for a long time, but only recently started making cigars for themselves instead of just producing for others.

This Casa Cuevas Reserva Maduro Toro is made with a Mexican San Andres wrapper. The binder is Piloto Cubana from the Dominican Republic. The filler contains tobacco from Ometepe, Nicaragua, and from the Dominican Republic. For this review, I smoked the 6×50 Toro. Other sizes available are a 5×52 Robusto and a 6¼x52 Torpedo.

The cigar looks good. The wrapper is dark, very dark. But evenly dark, and a bit on the dry side. The blue, white, and silver ring is similar to the new world Romeo y Julieta ring. The construction feels great and the triple cap is flawless. The cigar smells like dark chocolate and soil. Bittersweet and intense.

The cold draw is a bit tights. Quite spicy yet with a dark chocolate undertone. After lighting the cigar gives dark chocolate, earthiness, coffee. Bittersweet flavors with black pepper. In the second third, the dark chocolate is still the main flavor, but now with hay, coffee, and soil. The pepper tones down a bit. There is a hint of citrus. The cigar is balanced, yet not smooth. Halfway it’s still possible to retrohale without too much spice in the nose. The mouthfeel is still dry. In the final third, more wood shows up with some leather. But the spice and the dark chocolate are still going strong as well.

The draw is good, better than in the cold draw. The smoke is thick, white, and full. The burn is straight. The ash is almost white, yet it breaks quite easily. This cigar isn’t very strong, but the flavors are bold. The cigar is balanced. The evolution isn’t spectacular, but the overall flavors are good. The smoke time is two hours and thirty minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? Yes

Categories: 90, Dominican cigars, Tabacalera Las Lavas | Tags: , , , ,

Cimarron Connecticut Robusto

Cimarron Connecticut Robusto. In 2018, Tabacalera El Artista released the Cimarron. And not just in one blend, but in three. Once with a Connecticut Shade wrapper, one with a Maduro wrapper. And a third one, with a Habano wrapper exclusively for Germany. Recently, a soft box-pressed toro was launched as a Dominican exclusive. Ram Rodriguez, the third generation to work at Tabacalera El Artista, was heavily involved in the blending process. And as he is not a fan of Connecticut Shade tobacco, blending the Connecticut version was hard to do. In a Zoom conversation, Rodriguez said he feels like he succeeded. And that the Cimarron is a Connecticut Shade blend that is suitable for the smokers that don’t like Connecticut Shade wrappers. That includes me, I dislike Connecticut Shade with a passion.

Tabacalera El Artista is around since 1965, but most of the time, they have been on the background. Going and trading tobacco, making private labels, and no-name bundle cigars. But the last few years, Tabacalera El Artista is coming in strong with great blends under their own brands. And as tobacco growers, they are innovators. The filler of the Cimarron uses T13 tobacco, a hybrid. Created by Tabacalera El Artista. The company is also responsible for bringing back Negrito, an old tobacco variety. It was very popular in the mid-1900s but lost popularity. Ram Rodriguez brought it back as a tribute to his grandfather. Tabacalera El Artista uses Dominican Negrito in many of its blends. The wrapper on this 5×54 Robusto comes from Honduras, which is different from Ecuadorian or American Connecticut Shade.

The wrapper is quite dark for a Connecticut Shade. It has a thin, long, vein on the side. The classic looking ring is clean and clear. White, green, and gold are a color combination that works well. The cigar has a beautiful triple cap and feels well constructed. The aroma is medium strong, the aroma is that of a freshly cut down apple tree mixed with straw.

The cold draw is fine with a mild wooden flavor. Once lit, the cigar has a spice, oak, sweetness, but also a little bit of that old book Connecticut flavor. The cigar does have some bitterness that is classic Connecticut Shade as well, but all the while it’s creamy too. There are pepper, cedar, and leather. The sweetness is almost marzipan like. Halfway the first third, there is a slightly nutty flavor as well. After a third, the cigar is woody with nuts, some sweetness, soil, and leather. Halfway, the nuttiness of the flavors is enough to fool the smoker into thinking it’s a Corojo wrapper. There is no sign of the classic Connecticut profile, just a nice and spicy nuttiness that fits more into a Corojo profile. The final third is a beautiful mix of different woods, soil, leather, and nuts. The pepper is still there but balanced and on the background. The finale is peppery and strong.

The draw is fine while the smoke is thick and nice. The burn is straight. The grayish ash is firm. The cigar is medium in both body and flavor. There is a nice evolution in the cigar. All along with the cigar, there is a little roughness that gives the mildness some edge. Without that roughness, the cigar would be boring. The smoke time is three hours and thirty minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? It’s one of the few Connecticut’s I enjoyed.

Categories: 90, Cimarron, Dominican cigars, Tabacalera El Artista | Tags: , , , ,

Diamond Crown Julius Caeser Toro

Diamond Crown Julius Caeser Toro. A cigar created to honor and commemorate Julius Caeser Newman. The Eastern European immigrant that started J.C. Newman Cigar Company in 1895. The company is still going strong, with the fourth and fifth-generation now in charge. It’s the oldest, still existing cigar brand in the United States. J.C. Newman makes cigars in Tampa, Florida, and Esteli, Nicaragua. The Dominican cigars from J.C. Newman, including those Diamond Crown Julius Caeser are made at Tabacalera A. Fuente y Cia. Fuente and Newman have a long-lasting relationship. Not only a working relationship when it comes to cigar production. The companies also work together for distribution and charity. The Cigar Family Charity Foundation is the brainchild of Carlito Fuente and the brothers’ Eric & Bobby Newman.

In 2010, the Newman family released this line. With Dominican filler and binder, wrapped in an Ecuadorian Havana wrapper. There are several sizes available, but the sampler that Bobby Newman gave Ministry of Cigars contained this 6×52 Diamond Crown Julius Caeser Toro. If you think that Julius Caeser is written wrongly, you are right and wrong. When the young Newman came to the USA as an immigrant, immigration officers wrote his name incorrectly. Newman never corrected it, and he was known as Julius Caeser for the rest of his life. And for decades after, due to the family heritage and the cigar line carrying his name.

The cigar has an oily, Colorado Maduro colored wrapper. There are some veins. It’s clearly a sun-grown wrapper. Not just the color gives it away, but also the texture and the veins. The ring is Roman Empire inspired with columns and an image of an emperor with a golden wreath. Now it’s the question, is the emperor on the ring Julius Caesar or an image of Julius Caeser Newman, the founder of the J.C. Newman Cigar Company? The cigar feels well constructed. The aroma is strong, vegetal, and earthy.

The cold draw is spicy, peppery, and full of flavor. After lighting, there is a salty, earthy coffee flavor. The same flavors show up in the retrohale as well, but with a little cedar as a bonus. There is a little spice, which comes close to paprika. Very unique and something we never tasted in a cigar before. Slowly the cigar moves to nutty tones, with ground black pepper, leather, and earthy flavors. The earthy flavors are starting to dominate the palate, with pepper as its main accomplice. But the pepper isn’t overpowering, it’s balanced. But after a few puffs, the flavors change to wood. There is a lot of dynamics in the first part of the cigar. The cigar mellows out after that, not in flavor strength, but in dynamics. The wood flavor is the main flavor, with pepper, spices, earthiness, and leather as supporting flavors. After the first third, some dried grass shows up as well. Later on, there is also some citrus and sweetness to go with the previously mentioned flavors. As well as very faint milk chocolate. Cedar gets more pronounced in the retrohale. At the beginning of the final third, the flavors change to leather with pepper, spice, and still that earthiness. The finale sees a lot of pepper.

The draw and the burn are both great. The right amount of resistance, and a very straight burn. The smoke is decent, it could have been a bit thicker though. The salt and pepper colored ash is firm. The cigar is balanced. It’s a medium to full-bodied cigar, full-flavored. Bold almost. The smoke time is three hours exactly.

Would I buy this cigar again? I like it a lot but it’s too expensive for a regular smoke.

Categories: 92, Diamond Crown, Dominican cigars, Tabacalera A. Fuente y Cia | Tags: , , , ,

Viking Valhalla Churchill

Viking Valhalla Churchill. This is a cigar with a little bit of history. For more than 20 years, sigar.com is a distributor for cigars in Norway. The company had private labels such as Amero and Chess before discontinuing them. A new private label was released. One that celebrated the Nordic history. Viking Cigars. The fourth blend, released in 2018 is the Viking Valhalla. And that’s when things get confusing. Viking Cigars is not American Viking Cigars, so that’s already a very similar name. But when it comes to Valhalla, things are more complicated. Scandinavian Tobacco Group owns the Valhalla trademark. Viking sells a cigar named Valhalla. Freyja sells cigars under the Valhalla name. And Royal Danish sells cigars with Valhalla on the ring. 

All Viking cigars for sigar.com are produced in the Dominican Republic. At La Alianza, the factory of industry veteran Ernesto Perez Carrillo. For the Valhalla, Perez Carrillo and Hakon Aanonsen from sigar.com used an Ecuadorian Habano wrapper. The duo never disclosed the filler and binder. There are four vitolas available. You can read several other Viking reviews on the site. For this review, the 6½x54 Churchill is selected.

The cigar looks great. A thick, dark, greasy, oily wrapper. The pigtail fits the look. The dark ring, black with gold and typical Nordic design. The cool thing about this ring is that it isn’t paper. It’s a metal alloy. Not sturdy, so you can bend it around the cigar. The only thing is that this ring isn’t as detailed as the rings on the other three Viking lines. But still, unique and pretty. The cigar feels well constructed. There is a strong barnyard aroma with hay and straw.

The cold draw is good. A mild wood flavor with some floral notes. Lit there is a mixture of herbs, coffee, sweetness, leather, and earthiness. Quickly after some salty wood shows up, which disrupts the balance in the cigar. The salty wood isn’t the most pleasant experience. It’s a little rough. The mouthfeel is thick and sticky. A walnut flavor slowly starts to come through. The salty flavor disappears, and the balance returns. The flavors are more rounded now. Black pepper shows up too. The pepper and walnuts are more pronounced. The walnut is persistent, the pepper changes from black to red chili. The mouthfeel remains thick, meaty, and creamy, like a mousse. There is some leather in there as well. In the final third, the cigar gets slightly rough again. There is a red pepper tongue bite.

The draw is great. The white ash is firm. Thick white smoke in large quantities. When it comes to those aspects, this cigar delivers. The burn is straight as a ladies man. This cigar is medium-bodied and medium flavored. The smoke time is two hours and forty-five minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? No, I will stick to the Viking Viking or Viking Nordic Warrior.

Categories: 90, Dominican cigars, Tabacalera La Alianza, Viking | Tags: , , , , , ,

Davidoff Puro d’Oro Eminentes

Davidoff Puro d’Oro Eminentes. The eminent is the toro in the line up of the Davidoff Puro d’Oro line. The line was introduced in 2010, with the Eminentes as a line addition in 2011. This particular cigar is a well-aged cigar from the personal collection of the Managing Director UK for Davidoff Distributors U.K. For some reason, the golden Davidoff ring is missing except for the foot ring. According to the Managing Director UK, this cigar is from 2009, making it a pre-release. And that could be the reason for the missing ring.

The cigar is slightly larger and thicker than a regular 6×50 toro. It measures 6¼x52. And it’s one of the Dominican puros from Davidoff. All the tobacco in the cigar is aged for a minimum of five years. And the wrapper, hailing from Yamasa, is developed by no other than Henke Kelner himself.

The cigar looks good. It looks better with just the foot ring in extremely glossy gold color. The embossing on the ring gives the ring more grandeur. The Colorado colored wrapper is smooth, oily, and silky. The little pigtail is a nice touch. The construction feels great. A mild yet spicy aroma finishes the pre-light experience

The cold draw is easy. The cold draw gives a spicy wood and soil flavor. Once lit, it’s all about strong black coffee. Coffee, coffee, and coffee. Slowly some soil and charred wood join the coffee. The flavors are dark yet very pleasant. A faint nut flavor shows up as well, with some spices. Slowly some sweetness shows up too with faint leather. But the coffee never disappears completely. The coffee remains the base flavor, but now with a little more spice, some grass, earthiness, and leather. Halfway the flavors turn. The coffee mellows down, wood becomes more dominant with some sweetness, white pepper, and spices. The final third is more wood, with still some coffee, and an increasing dose of pepper.

The draw is great. The smoke is thick and full, and plenty in volume. The burn is slow and straight with firm white ash. This is indeed a full-bodied cigar from Davidoff, full-flavored as well. Even though the cigar packs a punch, it never gets mean. The balance is fantastic. The smoke time is four hours.

Would I buy this cigar again? Yes. This is a Davidoff I truly enjoyed.

Categories: 91, Cigars Davidoff, Davidoff, Dominican cigars | Tags: , , , ,

Casdagli Traditional Grand Cafe

Casdagli Traditional Grand Cafe. This is the first Casdagli cigar to be made in the Dominican Republic. It was released in 2012 under the name Bespoke. Bespoke started with custom rolled Cuban cigars. Then moved to Costa Rica and the company started to gain traction. The Grand Cafe name is a tribute to Bespoke’s first customer, the Grand Cafe in Minsk, Belarus. More on the Bespoke/Casdagli cigar history can be found here.

Two years ago, Bespoke was renamed to Casdagli Cigars. But the blend didn’t change. In a Zoom chat with Jeremy Casdagli and a group of cigar enthusiasts from New Zealand, Canteros.nz, Casdagli’s distributor, offered to sponsor some cigars for reviews. The package arrived soon after and included these Casdagli Traditional Grand Cafe. The cigars are made with Brazilian Cubra as a wrapper. A binder from the Dominican Republic. And filler from Peru, Nicaragua, and the Dominican. It measures 7½x39.

The cigar is a looker. Slender and long. Colorado to Colorado Maduro in color. Oily wrapper. Closed foot and a pigtail. With a classy, traditional-looking ring. Green and gold with a vintage picture in the center. The construction feels good. The cigar has a strong aroma. Classic barnyard, manure, earthy aromas.

The cold draw is surprisingly good. Even with a closed foot, the draw is great. It leaves a mildly spicy, peppery flavor on the lips. Straight from the start, there is a strong yet sweet coffee flavor. With strong, we don’t mean espresso, but full flavor. It then turns more towards wood flavors, with a little spice. Not pepper, but spice. Yet there is still some coffee on the background. The flavors slowly evolve into earthy, leathery wood, with cumin. But the flavors are rounded, well balanced, and smooth. The second third has a classic mixture of wood, earthiness, leather, coffee with some sweetness. There is a little vanilla. All flavors are brought together by some citrus. The mouthfeel is creamy. The final third leans more towards leather and wood, but with a creamy mouthfeel. Suddenly there is a slight chocolate flavor as well.

The draw is amazing, just like the copious amounts of smoke the cigar produces. The burn is beautiful. The ash is salt and pepper colored, but it’s not too firm. This cigar is balanced, smooth, well rounded. Elegant in both size and flavors. Traditional, not a powerhouse heavy in ligero. This is a cigar that would fit into every past decade without being outdated of old-fashioned. It’s medium-bodied, medium flavored. The smoke time is two hours and thirty minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? Yes I will

Categories: 91, Bespoke, Dominican cigars, KBF | Tags: , , ,

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