Dominican cigars

Viking Valhalla Churchill

Viking Valhalla Churchill. This is a cigar with a little bit of history. For more than 20 years, sigar.com is a distributor for cigars in Norway. The company had private labels such as Amero and Chess before discontinuing them. A new private label was released. One that celebrated the Nordic history. Viking Cigars. The fourth blend, released in 2018 is the Viking Valhalla. And that’s when things get confusing. Viking Cigars is not American Viking Cigars, so that’s already a very similar name. But when it comes to Valhalla, things are more complicated. Scandinavian Tobacco Group owns the Valhalla trademark. Viking sells a cigar named Valhalla. Freyja sells cigars under the Valhalla name. And Royal Danish sells cigars with Valhalla on the ring. 

All Viking cigars for sigar.com are produced in the Dominican Republic. At La Alianza, the factory of industry veteran Ernesto Perez Carrillo. For the Valhalla, Perez Carrillo and Hakon Aanonsen from sigar.com used an Ecuadorian Habano wrapper. The duo never disclosed the filler and binder. There are four vitolas available. You can read several other Viking reviews on the site. For this review, the 6½x54 Churchill is selected.

The cigar looks great. A thick, dark, greasy, oily wrapper. The pigtail fits the look. The dark ring, black with gold and typical Nordic design. The cool thing about this ring is that it isn’t paper. It’s a metal alloy. Not sturdy, so you can bend it around the cigar. The only thing is that this ring isn’t as detailed as the rings on the other three Viking lines. But still, unique and pretty. The cigar feels well constructed. There is a strong barnyard aroma with hay and straw.

The cold draw is good. A mild wood flavor with some floral notes. Lit there is a mixture of herbs, coffee, sweetness, leather, and earthiness. Quickly after some salty wood shows up, which disrupts the balance in the cigar. The salty wood isn’t the most pleasant experience. It’s a little rough. The mouthfeel is thick and sticky. A walnut flavor slowly starts to come through. The salty flavor disappears, and the balance returns. The flavors are more rounded now. Black pepper shows up too. The pepper and walnuts are more pronounced. The walnut is persistent, the pepper changes from black to red chili. The mouthfeel remains thick, meaty, and creamy, like a mousse. There is some leather in there as well. In the final third, the cigar gets slightly rough again. There is a red pepper tongue bite.

The draw is great. The white ash is firm. Thick white smoke in large quantities. When it comes to those aspects, this cigar delivers. The burn is straight as a ladies man. This cigar is medium-bodied and medium flavored. The smoke time is two hours and forty-five minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? No, I will stick to the Viking Viking or Viking Nordic Warrior.

Categories: 90, Dominican cigars, Tabacalera La Alianza, Viking | Tags: , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Davidoff Puro d’Oro Eminentes

Davidoff Puro d’Oro Eminentes. The eminent is the toro in the line up of the Davidoff Puro d’Oro line. The line was introduced in 2010, with the Eminentes as a line addition in 2011. This particular cigar is a well-aged cigar from the personal collection of the Managing Director UK for Davidoff Distributors U.K. For some reason, the golden Davidoff ring is missing except for the foot ring. According to the Managing Director UK, this cigar is from 2009, making it a pre-release. And that could be the reason for the missing ring.

The cigar is slightly larger and thicker than a regular 6×50 toro. It measures 6¼x52. And it’s one of the Dominican puros from Davidoff. All the tobacco in the cigar is aged for a minimum of five years. And the wrapper, hailing from Yamasa, is developed by no other than Henke Kelner himself.

The cigar looks good. It looks better with just the foot ring in extremely glossy gold color. The embossing on the ring gives the ring more grandeur. The Colorado colored wrapper is smooth, oily, and silky. The little pigtail is a nice touch. The construction feels great. A mild yet spicy aroma finishes the pre-light experience

The cold draw is easy. The cold draw gives a spicy wood and soil flavor. Once lit, it’s all about strong black coffee. Coffee, coffee, and coffee. Slowly some soil and charred wood join the coffee. The flavors are dark yet very pleasant. A faint nut flavor shows up as well, with some spices. Slowly some sweetness shows up too with faint leather. But the coffee never disappears completely. The coffee remains the base flavor, but now with a little more spice, some grass, earthiness, and leather. Halfway the flavors turn. The coffee mellows down, wood becomes more dominant with some sweetness, white pepper, and spices. The final third is more wood, with still some coffee, and an increasing dose of pepper.

The draw is great. The smoke is thick and full, and plenty in volume. The burn is slow and straight with firm white ash. This is indeed a full-bodied cigar from Davidoff, full-flavored as well. Even though the cigar packs a punch, it never gets mean. The balance is fantastic. The smoke time is four hours.

Would I buy this cigar again? Yes. This is a Davidoff I truly enjoyed.

Categories: 91, Cigars Davidoff, Davidoff, Dominican cigars | Tags: , , , ,

Casdagli Traditional Grand Cafe

Casdagli Traditional Grand Cafe. This is the first Casdagli cigar to be made in the Dominican Republic. It was released in 2012 under the name Bespoke. Bespoke started with custom rolled Cuban cigars. Then moved to Costa Rica and the company started to gain traction. The Grand Cafe name is a tribute to Bespoke’s first customer, the Grand Cafe in Minsk, Belarus. More on the Bespoke/Casdagli cigar history can be found here.

Two years ago, Bespoke was renamed to Casdagli Cigars. But the blend didn’t change. In a Zoom chat with Jeremy Casdagli and a group of cigar enthusiasts from New Zealand, Canteros.nz, Casdagli’s distributor, offered to sponsor some cigars for reviews. The package arrived soon after and included these Casdagli Traditional Grand Cafe. The cigars are made with Brazilian Cubra as a wrapper. A binder from the Dominican Republic. And filler from Peru, Nicaragua, and the Dominican. It measures 7½x39.

The cigar is a looker. Slender and long. Colorado to Colorado Maduro in color. Oily wrapper. Closed foot and a pigtail. With a classy, traditional-looking ring. Green and gold with a vintage picture in the center. The construction feels good. The cigar has a strong aroma. Classic barnyard, manure, earthy aromas.

The cold draw is surprisingly good. Even with a closed foot, the draw is great. It leaves a mildly spicy, peppery flavor on the lips. Straight from the start, there is a strong yet sweet coffee flavor. With strong, we don’t mean espresso, but full flavor. It then turns more towards wood flavors, with a little spice. Not pepper, but spice. Yet there is still some coffee on the background. The flavors slowly evolve into earthy, leathery wood, with cumin. But the flavors are rounded, well balanced, and smooth. The second third has a classic mixture of wood, earthiness, leather, coffee with some sweetness. There is a little vanilla. All flavors are brought together by some citrus. The mouthfeel is creamy. The final third leans more towards leather and wood, but with a creamy mouthfeel. Suddenly there is a slight chocolate flavor as well.

The draw is amazing, just like the copious amounts of smoke the cigar produces. The burn is beautiful. The ash is salt and pepper colored, but it’s not too firm. This cigar is balanced, smooth, well rounded. Elegant in both size and flavors. Traditional, not a powerhouse heavy in ligero. This is a cigar that would fit into every past decade without being outdated of old-fashioned. It’s medium-bodied, medium flavored. The smoke time is two hours and thirty minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? Yes I will

Categories: 91, Bespoke, Dominican cigars, KBF | Tags: , , ,

Davtian Trinidad Robusto Gordo

Davtian Trinidad Robusto Gordo. The brand was founded by the Armenian businessman and cigars aficionado David Davtian in 2011. That was 8 years after Davtian became a retailer and distributor for several Non-Cuban brands for Armenia. And five years after he became the chairman of the Armenian Association. He traveled to all the cigar producing countries in the Caribbean and decided that the Dominican Republic would be the country for his own brand. Davtian Cigars was born. Ministry of Cigars reviewed the Davtian Davtian Trinidad and the Davtian Primus Robusto Gordo last year.

According to the Davtian website, this cigar measures 5×57. But the cigar doesn’t look that tick. The Herics cigar tape was brought in as the judge and the cigar came in as a ring 56, which is still way thicker than the cigar looks. The blend information on the website is pretty detailed. Not much is known about the factory though. Tabacalera El Puente is a factory in the Dominican Republic. In Santiago to be precise but the website is empty and not much information is found online.

The cap is a nice twist cap, like a flat pigtail. The black and matte silver ring has a nice, unusual shape. It doesn’t say which line it is though, so you need to have access to the internet to know which blend you’re smoking. The Colorado Maduro colored wrapper looks leathery, with one thin, sharp vein on the side. The cigar feels well constructed, there are no knots of soft spots detectable. The aroma is full, thick with a barnyard and dried softwood smell.

The cold draw is smooth. The flavors in the cold draw are not. Sharp, strong, dry, and peppery. Once lit, the cigar has a dry yet full flavor of coffee with leather, and spice. The flavors are dry, very dry. The coffee fades away, the leather and the spice remain with some earthiness and dry dark wood. Slowly cinnamon becomes more dominant, with a little white pepper. After a third, the cigar tastes like dry leather, strong spice, white pepper, and has some acidity as well. On the border of the final third, the cigar shows signs of cocoa powder as well, with the previously mentioned flavors. In the final third, the cigar turns more to dry wood, spice, earthiness, yet without losing the leather.

The draw is a bit on the loose side. There is a good amount of white smoke coming from the cigar. The ash is firm yet a little coarse. The color is light gray. The burn is okay, not razor sharp but on the other hand, it doesn’t need correction either. This is a medium to medium-full bodied cigar, medium flavored. Even though the mouthfeel is very dry, it’s enjoyable. The smoke time is two hours and thirty minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? Possibly.

Categories: 89, Davtian, Dominican cigars, Tabacalera El Puente | Tags: , , , ,

VegaFina 1998 VF52

VegaFina 1998 VF52. Tabacalera, the Spanish tobacco monopoly, founded VegaFina in 1998. Later Tabacalera merged with the French tobacco monopoly SEITA and formed Altadis. And last year, Altadis released the VegaFina 1998 in three sizes to commemorate the fact. The cigars are available on International markets only, and not in the USA. VegaFina has always focussed more on Europe than on the American market anyway. This blend was created by the master blenders with tobacco from five different countries. All the tobacco is aged for at least three years. The VegaFina 1998 is marketed as a premium offering from VegaFina, yet the prices are mid-range.


The complex blend of the cigar forced the blenders to bring their A-game. A dark Ecuadorian wrapper combined with an Indonesian binder from Java. For those that don’t know Indonesia that well, Java is the most populated of the 16.000 islands that make Indonesia what it is. For the last 400 years, tobacco is cultivated after the Dutch colonists brought tobacco seeds from their travels to the Caribbean. Sumatra, about 3 ½ times bigger than Java, is also a well-known tobacco-growing island. The filler comes from the Dominican Republic, Nicaragua, and Colombia. For this review, we selected the 5½x52 VF52


The wrapper is dark and oily. It does not have a smooth appearance, but the darkness and oil make up for it. The ring is different than the current VegaFina offerings. No slick logo with the silver VegaFina uses nowadays. This ring looks older. It’s probably the same design as VegaFina used in 1998. A throwback, going with the theme of commemorating the first VegaFina release. The slick black secondary ring with the white 1998 numbers looks good. The cigar has a nice bounce when gently squeezed. The aroma is mild woody.


The cold draw is great. There isn’t much flavor in the cold draw, just peppery wood, but mild. The cigar starts with coffee, green herbs, salt, and wood. The flavors evolve to coffee, wood, leather, and pepper. The mouthfeel is dry. Softwood pepper, spices, coffee, and earthiness. More pepper and some grassy flavors show up, and the cigar tastes a little burned. Halfway there is a mixture of green herbs, pepper, and nuts. The final third has wood, soil, and pepper. For a while, there was some faint vanilla flavor as well. The finale is earthy with pepper, wood, and sweetness.


The draw is a bit on the loose side, yet still acceptable. The ash is frayed. The burn had to be corrected a few times. The smoke is good. This is a medium-bodied, medium flavored cigar. It’s not smooth and the balance is a little off as well. The smoke time is two hours thirty-five.

Would I buy this cigar again? Meh

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Categories: 89, Casa de Garcia, Dominican cigars, VegaFina | Tags: , , , ,

Kristoff GC Signature Series Robusto

Kristoff GC Signature Series Robusto. Glen Case hit a mid-life crisis in the early 2000s and wanted to do something else than the financial services he provided for close to 20 years. As an avid cigar aficionado, he pursued a dream of becoming a cigar brand owner. And he did. In 2004 he founded Kristoff cigars, named after his son Christopher. After doing his homework, Case settled for the Charles Fairmorn factory in the Dominican Republic as his manufacturing partner. And now, 16 years later, the Kristoff cigars are sold in every corner of the world. And praised by cigar magazines and cigar blogs for years.


The Kristoff GC Signature Series was released mid-2011 at the IPCPR Trade Show. The blend was created for the cigar smoker with a well-educated palate and who likes a full-bodied cigar. To create a blend with notes that would entice these experienced, demanding smokers Case and the blenders used a Brazilian Maduro wrapper. For the binder, they took a Dominican leaf. The filler consists of all Cuban seed tobacco, from Nicaragua, Honduras, and the Dominican Republic. The robusto that we are reviewing measures 5½x54.


Kristoff cigars always look cool. The pigtail and closed foot are always bonus points for looks. The thick, dark and oily Brazilian Maduro wrapper isn’t the cleanest looking wrapper ever. But for a Brazilian wrapper, it looks good. And it looks very tasty. The ring is quite simple, yet the embossing and that the red on the front fades to back make it stand out. The cigar feels well made. The aroma is divine, dark chocolate with a little spice although the aroma could be a bit stronger.


The cold draw is always an issue with closed footed cigars. But once lit, that issue is solved. Pepper with espresso, strong, in your face. The flavors then turn a bit more to wood and dry leather. But the dark chocolate that was promised shows up too. As always with a closed foot, the start of the cigar is a little rough, it’s hard to get the burn going. The retrohale gives notes of dried fruit. Dark chocolate is the main attraction, with spice, coffee, wood, and dried fruit as support. After a third, there’s still dark chocolate with creamy, thick sweetness, leather, wood, and mild black pepper. But there is also a salty flavor. The dark chocolate and dried fruit are the baselines, with a growing pepper flavor. There’s also more sweetness and a little citrus. The chocolate flavor is thick, it’s like slowly melting a piece of 70% dark chocolate in your mouth. It coats the whole palate. The final third still has that dark chocolate with dried fruit. But there is also pepper, spice, leather, and an earthy flavor. The chocolate remains the strongest flavor, yet the pepper grows. And there is still some wood as well. Near the end, a nut flavor shows up as well, while the pepper mellows out. Hazelnuts to be precise.


The draw is great, after a rocky start. But that rocky start is normal with a closed foot. The burn is good. The white ash is quite firm. The smoke is sufficient, but it would be nicer if the smoke was thicker. The cigar is balanced yet a little rough around the edges. In a good way, it’s not smooth. But it shows character with balance, and that’s always good. The flavors are both in your face, yet with subtle flavors beyond the baseline flavors. That makes the cigar intriguing. The smoke time is two hours and forty-five minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? I want boxes!
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Categories: 92, Charles Fairmorn, Dominican cigars, Kristoff | Tags: , , , ,

Balmoral Añejo XO Gordo

Balmoral Añejo XO Gordo. In 2014, Royal Agio launched the Balmoral Añejo XO series. It was the follow up for the every successful Balmoral Añejo 18 release. The latter had an 18-year-old Brazilian wrapper. But when Royal Agio ran out of that wrapper, they created the Balmoral Añejo XO, still with aged tobacco but in larger supply. And the line was a success from the start. Worldwide, and it put the Balmoral brand on the map in the United States.


Today, there are 4 different Balmoral Añejo lines. The Añejo XO, the Añejo XO Connecticut, Oscuro, and Nicaragua. But the Balmoral Añejo XO Gordo was used as an event-only cigar in several countries. Due to the Covid-19 crisis, Royal Agio decided to release the cigar to all retailers last month. With so many people working from home, and more time on their hands, they could enjoy this Gordo without having to go to events. Events that are prohibited in most countries anyway during the pandemic.


The cigar is impressive. Big, thick, and aggressively looking. Brazilian Arapiraca tobacco isn’t the smoothest looking tobacco in the world. It’s rough and tough-looking with veins. It’s the Danny Trejo under the tobaccos. The ring makes up for it though. contemporary design. Gray, off white and gold. Stylish. The foot ring is in the same style. The cigar feels well constructed, evenly spongy all over. The aroma is peppery with dark chocolate.


The cold draw is very easy. The cigar has a dry tobacco flavor. After lighting there’s an immediate flavor explosion. Coffee, pepper, and sweetness. Slowly a mild spice shows up, herbal almost, with some leather. The herbal flavor starts to dominate and is supported by charred wood and earthiness. Some salt shows up as well, and the mouthfeel is mild creamy. After a third, there’s pepper, wood, grass, and some spices. The sweetness then reappears with more spices, wood, leather, and pepper. The wood flavor is a bit charred, like barbecue.


The draw is open, light, easy. Too open. There is a lot of smoke, white but it’s a little thin though. The burn has to be corrected several times as well. The cigar is smooth and mellow. Due to the wrapper filler ratio, the cigar lacks a bit of character. It is milder than the smaller sizes of the same blend. The cigar is medium-bodied, medium flavored. The smoke time is three hours and thirty minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? The blend yes, the size no!

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Categories: 89, Agio Caribbean Tobacco Company, Balmoral, Dominican cigars | Tags: , , , ,

Gurkha Marquesa Toro

Gurkha Marquesa Toro, a cigar released by Gurkha Cigars in 2018. In three sizes, 5×52 Robusto, 6×54 Toro, and 5×54 Belicoso. All that Gurkha revealed about the production is that the cigars are made in the Dominican Republic. But since Gurkha doesn’t have a factory, they have to be made at a third person facility. Yet, that facility has not been disclosed. Gurkha uses a lot of producers, and by knowing who’s responsible it’s easier to weed out the bad Gurkha cigars from the good ones. Without knowing the manufacturer, smoking the Marquesa Toro is a gamble.

Gurkha is a very old brand, but the Gurkha brand we know now has been around for 30 years. It started when Kaizad Hansotia bought the brand for a few hundred dollars while enjoying a vacation. He met a guy making the cigars on the beach and bought the whole stock, including the brand name. And in thirty years, he built the brand into a powerhouse with many fans and even more haters. But one thing can’t be denied, if you haven’t heard of Gurkha cigars, you’re not a real cigar smoker. Whether you like them or not is a different question.

This is a beautiful cigar. A smooth, dark wrapper, oily, with little to none imperfections. A beautiful, vintage-looking ring finished this 6×64 Toro. This is an eye-catching cigar. The cigar feels well constructed, with the right bounciness when squeezed gently. The cigar doesn’t feel plugged or underfilled. The aroma is medium in strength. It has manure and a damps forest smell.

The cold draw is great. The taste of the cold draw is dry hay with red pepper. The first puffs give dried out leather with a little vanilla. Some nutmeg shows up too, with a very dry mouthfeel. Some powdered sugar sweetness is there as well. A charred wood flavor is next with lemon-like acidity. After a third, there is a flavor of low-grade chocolate on the back of the palate, with something that comes close to old paper. A very dusty flavor with a little bit of white pepper. The final third starts with softwood, black pepper, and some mild sweetness. The pepper grows in strength, with some herbal sweetness as a supporting flavor.

The draw is good, good resistance in airflow. The burn is straight and slow. Even after the cigar dropped from the ashtray on the desk to the floor. The smoke is good. There is enough volume although the smoke is a little thin. The light-colored ash is firm. The Gurkha Marquesa Toro is a medium-bodied, medium flavored cigar. The smoke time is two hours and thirty minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? No, it scores high due to the construction and the looks, but flavor-wise it’s a middle of the road cigar at best

Categories: 90, Dominican cigars, Gurkha | Tags: , , ,

Pachuche Liga Roja Robusto

Pachuche Liga Roja Robusto. Pachuche is a brand we had never heard of until last September. The Swiss brand has been available for a few years, but only in Switzerland. Yet they are ready to expand, and secured distribution in Norway so far. Pachuche shared a booth with Viking Cigars at the Intertabac trade show, and Viking introduced us to Camillo Bazzell. Pachuche is Dominican slang for torcedor, a cigar roller.


The Liga Rojo is the second blend created out of the four Pachuche blends. It was created by Christian Bazzell, Camillo’s father, with the help of master blender William Ventura. The cigar is made with Dominican filler and binder. The wrapper is Mexican San Andres. There are three sizes available, we smoked the 5×50 Robusto for this review. The artwork on the cigar is designed by the half Mexican, half Swiss artist Patrick Küng, a childhood friend of Camillo Bazzell. Küng used his Mexican heritage as an inspiration.


The cigar looks good. The pastel green ring has a very detailed Mexican skull. The metallic foot ring makes clear what line of Pachuche you are smoking. The leathery wrapper is dark, almost Oscuro. But it’s oily, with tooth and almost without veins. The construction feels good. The cigar has a strong aroma of leather and wood.


The cold draw is good. It tastes like dry tobacco and raisin. Once lit, the cigar has a nice flavor of dark wood like oak. But with leather, soil and a little bit of a dark roast coffee. All very balanced and smooth on the palate. That changes to more leather, with grass, herbs, sweetness, and pepper. The second third starts with toast, leather, wood, and pepper. The flavors then become leather with pepper. But there’s also some chocolate and floral notes. The cocoa becomes a little stronger. In the final third, there is hay, leather, wood, chocolate, and a lot of pepper.


The white ash is dense and firm. The draw is good. The smoke is decent. The burn is pretty even as well. The cigar is well balanced, smooth and has character. It is a medium-full bodied cigar, full-flavored. The flavors are crisp. The smoke time is an hour and forty-five minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? Yes

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Categories: 92, Dominican cigars, Pachuche, Tabacalera William Ventura | Tags: , , ,

Daniel Marshall by Carlos Fuente – XXXVIII Limited Edition

Daniel Marshall by Carlos Fuente – XXXVIII Limited Edition. Earlier this year, Daniel Marshall announced a very special limited edition for his 38th anniversary. A cigar made for him by no other than Carlito Fuente, to honor their decades’ long friendship. As Marshall said “Carlos and I grew up together from boys to men sharing similar values, commitment to quality and an unrelenting quest for the best. What joins us together, the golden thread that runs through our veins and drives us to live our dreams is a commitment to creativity in all we do a richness of character and generosity of spirit.” Fuente called making the cigar a great honor and thanked Marshall for the opportunity. The cigar will be sold at 38 locations worldwide and is already highly sought after.

The cigar is a Dominican puro, with all tobaccos grown at Chateau de La Fuente. Some of the tobacco is aged up to 12 years. Marshall and Fuente did not reveal how many cigars are released. The cigar is only available in a 6⅜x52 Torpedo and comes in exclusive Daniel Marshall travel humidors. The humidors can carry up to 20 cigars but come with 8 of these limited edition masterpieces. As Carlos Fuente said “What a huge honor and privilege this project has been for me. It was a calling of the heart for a special friendship that I have cherished and appreciated for long before most anyone reading this knew anything about cigars. Thank you Daniel Marshall for being who you are and have been consistently all these many, many years.” Ministry of Cigars will add a thank you to Daniel Marshall for sponsoring this unicorn.

The cigar has a smooth, Clara colored wrapper. Silky and delicate. The torpedo is semi box-pressed and feels evenly filled. The cigar has two rings, a white and gold primary ring, with Marshall’s signature. The secondary ring is gold, but unlike many limited-edition rings, this is not a copy from Habanos. It’s gold with black and has a row of dots but that’s where the similarities stop. The font is different, the letters aren’t black. This ring is embossed, and much more upscale than the Habanos rings. You can see the effort and love poured into the design. The aroma is strong, deep spices such as cumin mixed with a barnyard aroma. Very pleasant, complex, and promising.

The cold draw is perfect, with a smooth leather flavor. From the start, there is honey with a slight citrus acidity, smooth leather, and a little earthiness. Add a little red pepper on the lips and you’ll get the flavor of this cigar. The honey sweetness remains, with wood, earthiness, pepper, spices, and some salt. The flavors already show complexity. Slowly coffee shows up as well, with some citrus again. The honey sweetness remains, just like cedarwood and pepper. Slowly the flavors turn more to cedar with white pepper. There is still some sweetness and citrus though, but more on the background with some coffee. The cigar slowly turns to more of a coffee-flavored cigar. But the flavor changes are very nuanced, very smooth, and very complexed. There is some sweetness, yet it is no longer honey but more like cane sugar. In the final third, there’s pepper with a smooth silky milk chocolate. The flavors are so smooth that even in the last third, retrohaling is not an issue. Cedar shows up on the palate again. Still with the milk chocolate and pepper.

The draw is phenomenal. The smoke is plentiful. It’s thick, it’s white, it’s voluminous. The light gray ash is firm, like a stack of dimes. And the burn? It’s straight. This is a medium-bodied and medium flavored cigar. But it’s balanced, complex, and smooth. This is a cigar best enjoyed in solitary. It deserves full attention. Experience as a cigar smoker and a good palate are required to fully ‘get’ this cigar. The smoke time is two hours and forty minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? I wish I could

Categories: 93, Daniel Marshall, Dominican cigars, Tabacalera A. Fuente y Cia | Tags: , , , , ,

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