Honduran cigars

Rocky Patel Number 6 Robusto

Rocky Patel Number 6 Robusto. One of the latest releases of Rocky Patel, released at the IPCPR trade show in July 2019. The number 6 is named after the test blend. Several test blends were made, and the 6th blend was picked. So that became the Rocky Patel Number 6. The cigar is available in several sizes, and for this review, we selected the 5½x50 Robusto.


Unlike most of the recent releases by Rocky Patel, this cigar is made in Honduras. For the last few years, most new cigars came from Patel’s factory in Nicaragua, Tavicusa. But this Number 6 is made at El Paraiso in Danli, Honduras. The blend consists of filler tobaccos from Nicaragua and Honduras. The binder is Honduran. And as a wrapper, Patel and his team picked a Honduran Corojo

The black and golden ring is huge. It covers half the cigar, and then there is another ring at the foot. But the matte black details, shiny gold and white letters work well together. The wrapper, as far as we can see, has a few thin veins. The color is great, and there is a light oily shine. The cigar feels well constructed. The medium-strong aroma is woody with some hay.


The cold draw is good, with a flavor of hay and allspice. The first puffs give coffee and dirt with pepper. There are spices as well. After that, it’s spicy and strong leather that tickles the back of the throat. Soon after the nuttiness from the Corojo wrapper shows up as well. To balance everything, there’s mild fruity citrus. The flavors change to nuts, leather, wood, hay, and sweetness. In the final third, the cigar has more wood, the sweetness and pepper are still there. The nut flavor is gone. The cigar starts to tingle in the back of the throat again.


The draw is great. The pepper and salt colored ash isn’t very firm though. The smoke is thick and plentiful and the burn is straight as an arrow. This is a medium-full bodied cigar, full-flavored. Well balanced, with character. But it’s not smooth. This is a cigar for a more experienced cigar smoker. The smoke time is three hours.

Would I buy this cigar again? Yes

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Categories: Honduran cigars, 92, Rocky Patel, El Paraiso | Tags: , , , | Leave a comment

Kafie 1901 Don Fernando Toro Bello

Kafie 1901 Don Fernando Toro Bello. Made at Tabacalera Kafie y Cia, one of the few remaining cigar factories in Honduras. Where there once were many factories in the Latin American country, only a few remains. Currently, there are less than 15 different factories still producing cigars in Honduras. Just to compare that, in and around Esteli there are over 100 factories large and small. Dr. Gaby Kafie left his full-time job as a physician in Florida to become a cigar manufacturer in his native Honduras. He and his team try to continue the cigar legacy of Honduras by preserving the cigar-making art.


The cigars are available in different sizes, but the one reviewed is the 6×54 Toro Bello. Other sizes available are a 5×50 Robusto and a 6½x52 Belicoso. There are also two 60 ring cigars, one 5 inches, and the other 6 inches in length. The Nicaraguan Cuban Seed wrapper is aged for 5 to 6 years before being used. The Honduran binder and the Nicaraguan and Dominican fillers are aged 3 to 4 years. Tabacalera Kafie is aging the tobacco at their factory warehouse.

The cigar looks good. A dark, smooth yet dry looking wrapper. But the triple cap looks a bit off, it’s like the torcedor used a different leaf for the second of the three caps, as it’s lighter than the rest. The glossy black and gold label is fine, print quality is good. Due to the size and color, the cigar looks impressive. While gently squeezing the cigar, not plugs or soft spots are detected. The aroma is strong, hay, stable, barnyard, those kinds of aromas.


The cold draw is great, with some sweet tobacco in the flavor. Once lit, the cigar delivers sweet coffee. The cigar then picks up in flavor and strength. Pepper, coffee, sweetness, and leather. The coffee is the strongest flavor, supported by the other mentioned flavors and citrus acidity. The flavors intensify, some mushroom and complex bitterness of dark chocolate are added. After a third, there is more wood, leather, and soil. The sweetness and citrus disappeared, but the coffee and pepper are still strong. Halfway the flavors are wood, leather, soil, and pepper with grass. The coffee makes a comeback, with dried leather and herbs. The final third starts with wood, leather and an unpleasant bitterness. The bitterness tones down, and makes place for spices and pepper. Coffee and some cocoa show up too.


The draw is great. The cigar produces a lot of smoke, thick and white. The burn had to be corrected once or twice. This cigar is flavorful, it has character and balance. The light-colored ash is semi-firm. This is a well balanced, rounded cigar with plenty of character. It’s full-bodied, full-flavored. The smoke time is three hours and twenty-five minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? Yes!

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Categories: 91, Honduran cigars, Kafie, Tabacalera Kafie y Cia

Alec Bradley Orchant Seleccion Twisty

Alec Bradley Orchant Seleccion. For the last few years, the British cigar retailer Cgars Ltd has been creating limited editions under the name Orchant Seleccion. It started in 2007 as a collaboration with Habanos distributor Hunters & Frankau. They approached Orchant with the idea to hand-select boxes of cigars that he thought were outstanding. Then add an ‘Orchant Seleccion’ ring and sell them exclusively through his C. Gars Ltd shop. Up till today, approximately 20 different Cuban cigars are part of the Orchant Seleccion. But all in a limited number of boxes, and gone is gone. But it’s not limited to Cuban cigars anymore.


In the last few years, Orchant found several producers of New World cigars to create a limited edition exclusively for Cgars Ltd and Turmeaus Tobacconist. Davidoff created one. Regius did an Orchant Seleccion, just like Oliva. Alec Bradley did one and last year Drew Estate created three different sizes under the Orchant Seleccion name. Those are the lightweight, middleweight, and heavyweight. But recently the Alec Bradley Orchant Seleccion made a comeback. Not as a rerun of the old version, but the same blend of Nicaraguan and Honduran tobaccos. Yet in three different, smaller, sizes. Including a rare, unique twist on the Culebra. Shorter and thicker than a regular Culebra, and with the name Twisty. The other two sizes are the Orchie and the Pointy. The Twisty is the last of the three cigars that will be reviewed.


The three cigars are intertwined, but not as much as a regular Culebra. That’s impossible because of the length and the thickness of the cigar. The Alec Bradley Orchant Seleccion Twisty is shorter and thicker than any other Culebra on the market. The wrapper is dark and oily. A little rustic too, with some veins and bumps. But the shine makes the cigar look tasty. The cigar feels well constructed. The aroma has hints of hay with some acidity. It’s quite mild.


The cold draw is good. Spicy raw tobacco, a little harsh but in a pleasant way. After lighting there’s an explosion of coffee with some dark chocolate and pepper. The coffee and dark chocolate get accompanied by some marzipan sweetness. There is also a little salt and licorice. At the end of the first third, there is some harshness. Wood, earthiness, dark bitter chocolate, herbs, and pepper are on the palate. There is also a slightly burned flavor, something all three cigars have in common. The final third has the complexity of dark chocolate again. It’s coffee, wood, leather, and pepper. But now with a mild sweetness as well.


The draw is fantastic. And the smoke is thicker and fuller than on the other two Alec Bradley Orchant Seleccion. The burn needed a touch-up or two. The white ash is firm and dense, but flaky. Even though this is the most accessible cigar of the three, it is also the least balanced. But it has character. The cigar is medium-full bodied, full-flavored. The smoke time is one hour and forty-five minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? I want a few as conversational pieces
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Categories: 90, Alec Bradley, Honduran cigars, Raices Cubanas | Tags: , , , ,

Alec Bradley Orchant Seleccion Pointy

Alec Bradley Orchant Seleccion. For the last few years, the British cigar retailer Cgars Ltd has been creating limited editions under the name Orchant Seleccion. It started in 2007 as a collaboration with Habanos distributor Hunters & Frankau. They approached Orchant with the idea to hand-select boxes of cigars that he thought were outstanding. Then add an ‘Orchant Seleccion’ ring and sell them exclusively through his C. Gars Ltd shop. Up till today, approximately 20 different Cuban cigars are part of the Orchant Seleccion. But all in a limited number of boxes, and gone is gone. But it’s not limited to Cuban cigars anymore.


In the last few years, Orchant found several producers of New World cigars to create a limited edition exclusively for Cgars Ltd and Turmeaus Tobacconist. Davidoff created one. Regius did an Orchant Seleccion, just like Oliva. Alec Bradley did one and last year Drew Estate created three different sizes under the Orchant Seleccion name. Those are the lightweight, middleweight, and heavyweight. But recently the Alec Bradley Orchant Seleccion made a comeback. Not as a rerun of the old version, but the same blend of Nicaraguan and Honduran tobaccos. Yet in three different, smaller, sizes. Including a rare, unique twist on the Culebra. Shorter and thicker than a regular Culebra, and with the name Twisty. The other two sizes are the Orchie and the Pointy. The Pointy is the second of the three cigars that will be reviewed.


The wrapper looks quite similar to the Alec Bradley Orchant Seleccion Orchie. Colorado Maduro colored, leathery with a long thin vein. But the green waterspot is missing. That makes the cigar ecstatically a little more pleasing. The dark, detailed ring is exactly the same. The O on the ring does have similarities with the Oliva logo. The aroma of this short, pointy cigar is darker than of the Orchie. More manure and barnyard than spices.


The cold draw is flawless, with a raw tobacco flavor. Once it, the cigar is salty with soil, coffee, and green herbs. There is a slight white pepper on the palate as well. The flavor then turns to something best described as black licorice with some dry leather and a little bit of coffee. The mouthfeel is chewy. The flavors are dark and become even darker with a burnt flavor. Burnt barbecue wood, pepper, green herbs. But a little evasive to the back of the throat. The cigar becomes more approachable, less burnt. More wood with dark roast coffee and pepper. The cigar then turns to earthiness, dark roast, pepper, and a little bit of a nutty flavor. The nutty flavor disappears as quickly as it showed up though. The pepper gains strength. A little sweetness shows up too. Near the end, it is dark wood, dark roast coffee, and very strong pepper.


The draw is good. The smoke is good, enough in volume yet it could be a tad thicker. The burn had to be corrected a few times. The ash is darker than the ash on the Orchie. The cigar is not balanced in the first third but balances out in the rest of the cigar. It’s a medium-full to full smoke. Full-flavored. Dark flavors, something we call a ‘winter’ cigar as it fits with the mood that comes with the shorter, darker days. The smoke time is two hours and twenty minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? Maybe

number89

Categories: 89, Alec Bradley, Honduran cigars, Raices Cubanas | Tags: , , , ,

Alec Bradley Orchant Seleccion Orchie

Alec Bradley Orchant Seleccion. For the last few years, the British cigar retailer Cgars Ltd has been creating limited editions under the name Orchant Seleccion. It started in 2007 as a collaboration with Habanos distributor Hunters & Frankau. They approached Orchant with the idea to hand-select boxes of cigars that he thought were outstanding. Then add an ‘Orchant Seleccion’ ring and sell them exclusively through his C. Gars Ltd shop. Up till today, approximately 20 different Cuban cigars are part of the Orchant Seleccion. But all in a limited number of boxes, and gone is gone. But it’s not limited to Cuban cigars anymore.


In the last few years, Orchant found several producers of New World cigars to create a limited edition exclusively for Cgars Ltd and Turmeaus Tobacconist. Davidoff created one. Regius did an Orchant Seleccion, just like Oliva. Alec Bradley did one and last year Drew Estate created three different sizes under the Orchant Seleccion name. Those are the lightweight, middleweight, and heavyweight. But recently the Alec Bradley Orchant Seleccion made a comeback. Not as a rerun of the old version, but the same blend of Nicaraguan and Honduran tobaccos. Yet in three different, smaller, sizes. Including a rare, unique twist on the Culebra. Shorter and thicker than a regular Culebra, and with the name Twisty. The other two sizes are the Orchie and the Pointy. The Orchie is the first of the three cigars that will be reviewed.


The Colorado Maduro colored wrapper has a spot on the wrapper. A green spot, which happens when a drop of water hits the leaf while drying. It does not change the flavor of the cigar but it just alters the look. There is one long, thin vein running over the cigar. The wrapper has a leathery look. The smell is amazing, sweet with spices. Cinnamon, nutmeg, allspice. The cigar feels good, evenly packed. The head is well rounded, with a nice triple cap. The ring is dark, with lots of details.


The cold draw is great. The raw tobacco flavor is spicy and strong. The first flavors are charred wood, spice, and leather. The spices include cumin, cloves and more. It’s delicate, subtle yet the cigar quite strong and in your face. There’s also a little sweetness and acidity. After a few puffs, some coffee shows up. Overall the flavors are a bit charred, burned. The flavors remain dark in the second third as well. Wood, soil, coffee. In the final third, there is more pepper, a little salt, and a strong earthiness with some coffee. The pepper grows and there is a hint of very dark chocolate.


The draw is great. There is enough smoke, it is quite thin though. The ash is white with some black smears. The burn is straight as an arrow. The cigar is medium-bodied, medium flavored. In the final third, the cigar becomes stronger, both in body and in flavor. The smoke time is one hour and forty-five minutes

Would I buy this cigar again? Maybe

number90

Categories: 90, Alec Bradley, Honduran cigars, Raices Cubanas

Asylum 13 Oblongata

Asylum 13 Medulla Oblongata, a line introduced at the IPCPR 2017 but only introduced to the international markets in 2019. An interesting concept, where two cigars with an identical blend and size are sold but in a different shape. The Medulla is a round cigar. The Oblongata is box-pressed. And the Medulla Oblongata is the part of the brain that controls involuntary reactions. Breathing, coughing, sneezing, hiccups etcetera. And now the brain has to decide which of the two is the best. The round Medulla or the box-pressed Oblongata.


The blend is identical to the Asylum 13 Corojo. It’s an all Honduran cigar with a Corojo wrapper. The only difference is the priming of the tobacco. The Asylum 13 Medulla Oblongata utilizes tobacco from higher priming. By using leaves from the higher of the plant, the flavor profile is different than the original Asylum 13 Corojo. The cigars are rolled in the El Aladino factory in Danli. The factory is owned by Christian Eiroa. Asylum Cigars is a partnership between Eiroa and Tom Lazuka.


Just like the Medulla, the cigar is wrapped in wax paper for ¾ of the cigar. Once removed, the Colorado colored Corojo wrapper is revealed. It does have some veins, but thinner than the ones on the Medulla. The cigar has the right amount of bounce when softly squeezed. And just like the Medulla, the aroma is medium strong. It’s dried wood and stable as well.


The cold draw is a bit tight. And the flavors are pepper, raw tobacco with a minty freshness. The Oblongata starts exactly like the Medulla. Muted, salty, and dusty. With a little bit of nutmeg. The salt remains, some cedar shows up too. But all still muted. There is some leather as well. Slowly the cigar gets more sweetness, more cedar, and some pepper. The cedar is stronger in the retrohale. The second third starts salty, with pepper, green herbs, cedar, and leather. The cigar turns more spicy and salty, with leather, cedar, and earthiness. The flavors remain the same throughout the third part. There seems to be less evolution than in the Medulla.


The draw is better after the cigar is lit. The ash is white and dense. The cigar is smooth, balanced. The burn is beautifully straight. The smoke could be a little thicker though, and bigger in volume. Although it picks up in the last third. This cigar is medium in body and strength. But it’s smooth and balanced throughout the cigar. The smoke time is two hours and fifteen minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? Maybe

number90

Categories: 90, Asylum, El Aladino, Honduran cigars | Tags: , , , , , ,

Asylum 13 Medulla

Asylum 13 Medulla Oblongata, a line introduced at the IPCPR 2017 but only introduced to the international markets in 2019. An interesting concept, where two cigars with an identical blend and size are sold but in a different shape. The Medulla is a round cigar. The Oblongata is box-pressed. And the Medulla Oblongata is the part of the brain that controls involuntary reactions. Breathing, coughing, sneezing, hiccups etcetera. And now the brain has to decide which of the two is the best. The round Medulla or the box-pressed Oblongata.


The blend is identical to the Asylum 13 Corojo. It’s an all Honduran cigar with a Corojo wrapper. The only difference is the priming of the tobacco. The Asylum 13 Medulla Oblongata utilizes tobacco from higher priming. By using leaves from the higher of the plant, the flavor profile is different than the original Asylum 13 Corojo. The cigars are rolled in the El Aladino factory in Danli. The factory is owned by Christian Eiroa. Asylum Cigars is a partnership between Eiroa and Tom Lazuka.


The cigar is almost completely covered in paper. The brown Asylum 13 ring with the logo and the skull and then a piece of wax paper wrapped around the cigar. The paper is printed with the name of the cigar, Medulla. This packaging would certainly pique our interest in a humidor full of cigars. Once removed, it’s clear that this is high priming, sun-grown Corojo. Dark and rustic looking because of some clear veins. The cigar is well-shaped and feels well constructed. There is a medium-strong aroma of dried wood and stable aromas.


The cold draw is great. The flavors in the cold draw are strong, raw tobacco. After lighting there is a dusty, muted yet salty flavor. There are woody and a leathery flavor as well but muted. Something is holding them back. Some cinnamon sweetness is noticeable in the retrohale. And there is a hint of pepper on the tip of the tongue. Slowly the flavors start to open up. The spice and pepper flavors become more pronounced. There is also some sweetness and more wood. The flavors gain some strength but remain smooth. Cedar, spices, and leather are the flavors on the palate. In the final third, the cigar gets more sweetness but the other flavors gain strength too. The last part of the cigar has salt, black licorice, wood, pepper, and soil. And all with a nice sweetness.


The draw is good. Just as the amount and thickness of the smoke. The burn started out wonky but after one little touch-up, it was fine. And the ash is dense, firm and white. The cigar is smooth, easy-going. There is balance, and it has nuanced flavors. It is a medium-bodied and medium-flavored cigar. The smoke time is two hours and fifteen minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? Yes, once in a while
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Categories: 91, Asylum, El Aladino, Honduran cigars | Tags: , , , , ,

Flor de Selva Year of the Rat Toro

Flor de Selva Year of the Rat Toro. A few years back, Davidoff started with an annual limited edition based on the Chinese zodiac calendar. And several companies followed, including Maya Selva for her Flor de Selva brand. We know of at least 7 companies that release cigars based on the Chinese zodiac calendar now. But being born in the year of the rat, married to someone with Chinese heritage and living in South East Asia, this year is special. That’s why I will be reviewing several ‘Year of the Rat’ cigars this year.


The Flor de Selva Year of the Rat is a 6×52 Toro. It retails for 19 euro in Germany, Europe’s largest cigar market. The cigar is made from tobaccos from Honduras and Nicaragua. The wrapper comes from Honduras. The binder is Nicaraguan. And the filler contains tobacco from both countries.

The cigar has two rings. The simple faded yellow and greenish Flor de Selva ring. But the foot ring sets the cigar apart from the rest of the Flor de Selva lines. It’s red, the Chinese color of prosperity. And it combines the image of the rat with Mayan hieroglyphics, merging Honduran and Chinese cultures together in this cigar. The wrapper is Colorado colored, with a sharp thin vein on the side. It isn’t the best looking cigar out there, but it’s also not the worst looking cigar. The construction feels great. The nose is nice. A warm aroma of hay and wood, medium strong.


The cold draw is nice, with a nice tobacco flavor. After lighting it’s a mellow and sweet coffee with soil flavor. There is some toast and a nice mix of gingerbread spices as well. The flavors are mellow, smooth and well balanced. There’s a slow evolution to cedar with the spices, toast, and sweetness. The aftertaste has a hint of white pepper. The sweetness is pure honey. The mouthfeel is creamy. Slowly the pepper gains more strength but the honey toast with cedar remains the base flavor for the cigar. In the second third, leather shows up and it’s a beautiful combination with the growing white pepper, toast, spices, and honey. In the final third, the cigar gets stronger, with more pepper, leather, and wood. The toast is dissolving, just like the honey. And the balance starts to disappear as well. And then the sweetness returns. The cigar now has a flavor profile of pepper, sweetness, and cedar with leather.


The draw is phenomenal. The light gray ash is a bit flaky. The burn is straight as an arrow. The smoke is good in volume but could be a bit thicker for a higher score. This is a medium-bodied, full-flavored cigar. The balance was spot on in the first two thirds, with a silky smooth flavor profile. The smoke time is two hours and fifteen minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? It’s expensive but I wouldn’t mind a few more
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Categories: 92, Flor de Selva, Honduran cigars, Tabacalera del Oriente | Tags: , , , ,

Camacho Ecuador Robusto

Camacho Ecuador Robusto. In 2008, Oettinger Davidoff acquired the Camacho brand, farms, and factory from the Eiroa family. And while Davidoff continued with the exciting Camacho blends for the first years, behind the scenes they were ready for a relaunch. In 2013, that relaunch hit the markets. Under the ‘Bold’ name, Davidoff reblended some of the Camacho lines and introduced stunning new packaging. A few new blends were added. The big gamble paid off and a year later a new line edition was added. That’s the Camacho Ecuador.


The Camacho Ecuador is made with Corojo, Criollo Ligero and Pelo de Oro from Honduras and the Dominican Republic as filler. It’s being held together with a Brazilian Mata Fina binder. And finally, an Ecuadorian Habano wrapper finishes the cigar. It comes in several sizes, but for this review, I smoked the 5×50 Robusto. While the Camacho factory was called Rancho Jamastran when it was owned by the Eiroa family, Davidoff changed the factory to Agroindustras Laepe, S.A. In 2016, a brand new factory was opened, designed by the Honduran architect Gonzalo Nunez Dias.

The cigar looks great. A nice, oily, dark wrapper. A perfectly shaped head. And that iconic label, copied by several other brands including Toraño. The black scorpion, the logo of the Camacho Bold series, is prominently visible on the ring. The construction feels good, it seems like and evenly packed cigar. The cigar has a nice leather aroma to it, medium strong.


The cold draw is great, perfect resistance. The flavor is a dry wood and tobacco flavor, with some spice in the aftertaste. After lighting, the first flavors are salt, coffee, pepper. It evolves to marzipan sweetness with leather, wood, soil, and toast with a peppery aftertaste. The wood, which is classic cedar, combines perfectly with the sweetness. But there is a little roughness in the flavors, it’s not well rounded. The sweetness and cedar remain the main flavors, with some spices, pepper, and dry leather. After a third, the cigar gets darker in flavors. The cedar turns to oak, there is more pepper. The flavors are better-rounded now. Halfway some toast shows up as well. In the last part, it’s mainly oak, with pepper, hay, some leather, and pepper.


The draw is very good. The ash is light-colored, dense and firm. A good volume of white smoke. The burn is pretty straight. But the flavors, although nice, aren’t well rounded. This is a medium to full-bodied cigar, medium flavored. The smoke time is two hours and fifteen minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? Maybe

number90

Categories: 90, Agroindustria LAEPE S.A, Camacho, Honduran cigars | Tags: , , ,

Steenbok Robusto

Steenbok Robusto. This Honduran puro is a Dutch cigar brand, made at Compania Hondurena de Tabacos in El Paraiso, Honduras. That’s where brands such as Kuuts, Miro, Placeres, and Zapata are made as well. The brand is founded by two cigar aficionados, Johan Loomans and Brigitte Altena, from The Netherlands. The brand was released in 2018. The packaging of the cigars is cool, silver tins containing either the robusto, mini-robusto, or the half corona. The cigars are for sale in The Netherlands only for now.


The blend is made of all Honduran tobacco and with that, it’s one of the few Honduran puros on the market in The Netherlands. The robusto measures 5×50, the classic robusto size. Steenbok Cigars handed us this sample at the Intertabac trade show in Dortmund, Germany last September.


The ring is huge and white. But what makes it stand out is that the brand isn’t printed. The letters are cut out so the wrapper is forming the name of the cigar. Handmade in Honduras is printed though, but in a color very close to the wrapper. The wrapper is bumpy with a few veins. And right over the ring, there is some discoloration due to water drops during fermentation. The construction feels good though. The burned wood aroma is quite strong.


The cold draw is great with a mild coffee and strong tobacco flavor. Once lit, the cigar produces a sweet coffee flavor. Some grassy flavors show up and match the coffee in strength. There’s also a little bit of leather and some pepper. The cigar has quite some sweetness too, and a bit of a dusty aftertaste that is typical for Connecticut Shade. But this cigar doesn’t have a Connecticut Shade wrapper so its a question where that comes from. There’s also a little nuttiness. The flavors also get some wood and herbs. But it’s all mild and sweet. The cigar is not unpleasant but lacks character. After a third, the cigar turns very creamy, with vanilla and some more pepper. And now the cigar is getting more interesting. After two thirds, the flavors are creamy, buttery with wood and pepper. The finale brings a lot of pepper, what a difference from the start


The draw is great, and the cigar produces a good amount of smoke. The burn is great. The ash is firm but dark. The cigar is smooth and balanced. Medium-bodied at best, medium flavored. The start lacks character but the cigar gains traction halfway. The smoke time is two hours and twenty minutes

Would I buy this cigar again? Yes, it’s a nice smooth medium cigar for a very nice price
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Categories: 90, Honduran cigars, Steenbok | Tags: , ,

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