Nicaraguan cigars

My Father Fonseca Robusto

My Father Fonseca Robusto. A Nicaraguan Fonseca, only available in the United States and possibly the Dominican Republic. Because the trademark that My Father Cigars acquired from Quesada Cigars in December of last year is only valid there. Cubatabaco owns the trademark for the Fonseca brand in the rest of the world. And now the new cigar is released. It’s highly anticipated, as My Father Cigars has been making fantastic cigars for years. The company won the Cigar Aficionado Top 25 list twice in the last decade. Not many companies can say that.

The new blend is all Nicaraguan. And all the tobacco comes from the farms of the Garcia family. The wrapper is a shade-grown Corojo ’99 Rosado variety. For this review, I smoked the 5¼x52 Robusto. Other sizes available are a 5½x54 Belicoso, 5⅜x42 Cosacos, 4¼x40 Petit Corona, 6×55 Toro Gordo, and a 6¼x52 Cedros. The last one is wrapped in cedar. The Cosacos come with the iconic Fonseca wax paper. The brand is 130 years old, but since the Cuban revolution, there are two versions. One Cuban, owned by Cubatobaco for the international markets. And one new world version for the American market. Fun fact is that Don Francisco Fonseca, the founder of the brand, moved to New York and became an American citizen in the early 1900s while still operating the factory in Cuba.

The cigar looks great. The ring is fantastic. The designers managed to merge the iconic Fonseca logo and the style that My Father Cigar uses perfectly. It is detailed, beautiful, and printed on high quality. It’s immediately recognizable as both a My Father Cigars product and Fonseca. The wrapper is smooth and oily. The cigar feels well constructed. The aroma is surprisingly floral with hints of wood.

The cold draw is very good. Mild spicy with wood. Once lit, the cigar gives coffee, spice, wood, and soil. With a little bit of citrus acidity and sugary sweetness. There are some cinnamon and nutmeg in the retrohale. Soon the Corojo wrapper starts to release the signature nut flavor, with wood, pepper, and leather. There is still a little sweetness that balances everything out. After a third, the spice mix is almost like gingerbread. With wood, leather, and a little bit of nuttiness. The cigar has a nice spice sweetness undertone all along. Not sugary sweetness, but more the sweetness you get with cinnamon rolls, without tasting like a cinnamon roll. Halfway the cigar gets a little darker flavor profile, with more oak. The pepper slowly grows to that classic, strong pepper that made the Don Pepin Garcia cigars so popular and famous. The final third is more wood, even with some barbecue flavor, and pepper. Making it a great cigar to smoke during or after a barbecue.

The draw is fantastic. The cigar produces a lot of smoke. Thick, white smoke. The ash is light-colored and dense. The burn is straight and slow. The cigar is very balanced, smooth yet with plenty of character. The cigar starts out medium but slowly grows to full-bodied. It’s full-flavored. The smoke time is two hours and thirty minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? I want boxes, boxes, and boxes.

Categories: 94, Fonseca, My Father Cigars, Nicaraguan cigars | Tags: , , , , | Leave a comment

Muestra de Saka Nacatamale

Muestra de Saka Nacatamale. A beautiful 6×48 Gran Corona from Dunbarton Tobacco & Trust. And if that name doesn’t ring a bell, Steve Saka will probably do. If Steve Saka doesn’t ring a bell, then you seriously need to upgrade your cigar knowledge. Saka was the first cigar blogger. Then he became a marketing consultant for J.R. Cigars, CEO for Drew Estate, and for a few years, he’s the owner, blender, and the face of Dunbarton Tobacco & Trust.

This Muestra de Saka Nacatamale is the second cigar in the Muestra de Saka line. And the first regular production, as the inaugural cigar was a limited edition. Named after a traditional Nicaraguan dish. It’s not the last time that Saka named a cigar after food though. The filler tobacco is all from one farm in Jalapa, Esteli. Add a Nicaraguan binder and an Ecuadorian Habano wrapper and you have the ingredients for this cigar. Made in Esteli, at Joya de Nicaragua. This cigar was a gift from Puros Asia, the Malaysian distributor for Dunbarton Tobacco & Trust.

The first thing that catches the eye, after it’s taken out of the coffin, is the lack of a cigar ring. The Muestra de Saka Nacatamale has a cloth foot ring. Include the coffin, and this is something that stands out in a humidor. Fluorescent yellow with red letters spelling Muestra de Saka, and black letters Nacatamale printed over the red letters. The wrapper is oily, yet has some veins. The dark color isn’t even everywhere, it’s lighter around the veins. But that makes this cigar intriguing. The cap has a little tail, but it’s no flag tail or pigtail. Just a little 2-millimeter tail. The construction feels fantastic. And the aroma is delicious, dark, spicy, and intense.

The cold draw is flawless with a spicy taste. Once it, it’s dark roast coffee with some red chili and sweetness. The flavors turn to grassy, nutty, spicy, and leathery. There is an earthy cinnamon flavor with some pepper, well blended and balanced. The coffee returns, and there is slight dark chocolate. The retrohale has a mildly sweet and mild spice flavor, close to nutmeg. The second third starts earthy with coffee. The smooth spices, with a little pepper, dominate the cigar. There is also some earthy chocolate. The final third has dark flavors, some oak, leather, spices, some black pepper. There is also a hint of sweetness and freshness. The oak gets stronger, with roasted tones. Roasted coffee returns as well. The finale has a little more black pepper.

The draw is fantastic. The smoke is almost Drew Estate like. Thick, full, white, and plentiful. The light-colored, almost white, ash breaks easily though. It’s so well balanced and so smooth that it doesn’t feel like a medium to a full-bodied cigar. But it is though, and it’s also full-flavored. The smoke time is two hours and forty minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? Hell yeah

Categories: 93, Fabrica de Tabacos Joya de Nicaragua, Muestra de Saka, Nicaraguan cigars | Tags: , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Diesel Whisky Row Robusto

Diesel Whisky Row Robusto. Who owns Diesel Cigars is a bit of a mystery to most cigar enthusiasts. Despite popular belief, it is not a brand from A.J. Fernandez although Fernandez is the manufacturer responsible for the brand. But the brand isn’t in the hands of A.J. Fernandez, it’s just blended by his skillful hands. And the production takes place at his factory in Esteli, Nicaragua. The owner of Diesel cigars is Scandinavian Tobacco Group, through Meier & Dutch. STG is the parent of General Cigars, Cigar.com, Cigarsinternational.com Thompson.com, Cigarbid.com, and more. Last year, they acquired Royal Agio as well. Meier & Dutch is a wholesale company that operates under the STG umbrella. The original Diesel Unholy Cocktail was only available at STG owned internet retailers in the past.

The Diesel Unholy Cocktail is so popular that the Diesel brand spawned into a whole series. And not exclusive through the STG stores anymore, but everywhere. Some lines even made it across the ocean to Europe. For the Diesel Whisky Row, the Diesel brand and Rabbit Hole distilleries collaborate. Rabbit Hole distilleries, a bourbon manufacturer, sends used barrels to A.J. Fernandez. Fernandez uses those barrels to age Mexican San Andres leaves. He uses them as a binder under an Ecuadorian Habano wrapper. For the filler, he uses aged Nicaraguan tobacco from Jalapa, Condega, and Ometepe. Ministry of Cigars reviews the 5½x52 Robusto.

The first thing that makes this cigar stand out is the shape of the ring. It’s big and diagonally placed over the cigar. But then there is a partially round part as well. Pastel blue, brown, and gray. It has the Diesel logo and the Rabbit Hole Bourbon logo. The foot ring is big as well that says that the cigar is bourbon barrel-aged and it has the names of both Diesel and Rabbit Hole prominently on the ring. The Colorado Maduro colored wrapper is smooth looking. Right below the head, there seems to be a softer spot. The aroma is strong, barnyard, and manure.

The cold draw is great. There is a bit of an alcohol taste in the cold draw, but that could be just a mind trick. There is some spice on the lips as well. Once lit, there is leather, wood, soil, and citrus acidity. There is also an alcohol flavor to the cigar, so the barrel aging does work. The barrel aging brings out more vanilla from the wood. There is a nice toasted flavor, floral, with wood, leather, nuts, and that alcohol right on the edge. Halfway there is also some nutmeg in the flavor profile, or is it cinnamon? Slowly the flavors change to wood, leather, and chocolate. All with that alcoholic mouthfeel and slight pepper. The sweetness returns, the pepper gains strength, and all on a base flavor of wood and leather.

The construction is great. A lot of thick white smoke. Beautiful light gray ash. A great draw and a straight burn. The cigar is smooth, well-rounded flavors. The cigar is medium to full in body, full in flavor. The smoke time is three hours and fifteen minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? On my next order

Categories: 91, Diesel, Nicaraguan cigars, Tabacalera A.J. Fernandez | Tags: , , , , ,

Deadwood Tobacco Leather Rose

Deadwood Tobacco Leather Rose. The Deadwood Tobacco series is an interesting project. One of the oldest Drew Estate accounts is based in Deadwood, South Dakota. And Deadwood is just a stone-throw away from Sturgis. Sturgis is the home of the largest motorcycle gathering in the world, with 500.000 visitors each year. Miss Vaughn Boyd was the owner of Deadwood Tobacco and she wanted a blend exclusively for her shop. She worked with the Drew Estate team and the Sweet Jane was born. Surprisingly, that sweet, infused cigar became a big hit at the Sturgis motorcycle event. Big, hairy, heavily tattooed bikers fell in love with the infused, sweetened cigar.

The line grew. Crazy Alice came along, just as Fat Bottom Belly. The demand for the cigars was so high, that Drew Estate asked Miss Boyd if they could offer the cigars to other shops, nationwide. Miss Boyd allowed it, and the popularity grew even bigger. This summer, the long lost sister Leather Rose returned to Deadwood. She is the bad-ass sister, who left Deadwood to rob banks and cause havoc. But she’s back with her sisters now, as a more robust and spicier version of the other Deadwood blends. The blend for this 5×54 Torpedo is undisclosed. The wrapper is Maduro, that’s all Drew Estate would disclose. But the origin of the wrapper, binder, and filler is a mystery.

The cigar looks a little rough and intimidating. The torpedo has a sharp head. The dark, slightly rough Maduro wrapper gives it a mean look. Add the spiderweb and the Cinco de mayo kinda lady on the ring and this is a cigar that is kinda scary. Kind of Halloween as well, without the pumpkin spice. But the looks fit with the story of the bad sister of the bunch. The construction feels good. As for the aroma, well, let’s say it’s unique. A mixture of smoked eel, Eau de toilet, and charred wood. Not unpleasant though.

The cap is sweetened, much to our disliking. As expected, the sweetened wrapper overpowers the flavor of the burning tobacco. Underneath the cotton candy sweetness, there is some citrus, wood, and leather. Slowly there is some roasted coffee bean flavor as well, and the sweetness seems to lose a little bit of strength. In the second third, pepper and wood are getting stronger.

The smoke is typical Drew Estate. A building on fire would not produce as much smoke as the Leather Rose. The ash is pepper and salt colored. The burn is beautiful. Due to the overwhelming cotton candy sweetness, this cigar isn’t balanced. It’s medium to medium-full bodied, full-flavored. Too bad the full flavor is mostly sweetness. The perfect smoke and fantastic construction play a big part in the 90 rating. Based on flavor alone, the cigar would rate much lower. The smoke time is one hour and forty minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? No. I’ll stick to traditional cigars.

Categories: Nicaraguan cigars

MAB Reserve Natural Lancero

MAB Reserve Natural Lancero. If you never heard of this cigar, that is not your lack of knowledge. This brand is quite big in Slovakia but you can’t find it easily outside Slovakia. The main cigar importer and distributor for Slovakia is the company behind the MAB brand. It’s their private label, and they sell a lot of them at their Dom Cigar Shops in the country. Outside of Slovakia, I only encountered the brand in The Netherlands, and only for a brief period of time.

There are several European cigar importers with private labels. I am surprised that none of them do a quid pro quo. It’s easy for one distributor to say to another “if you distribute my brand in your territory, I will distribute your brand in mine”. If My&Mi would do that, this Dominican made cigar would be available in more countries. And the blend with Dominican filler and binder with a Cuban seed wrapper would get more attention.

The cigar looks good. A nice dark and oily wrapper. A pigtail is always bonus points when it comes to presentation. The beige ring with gold and dark red is simple. A nice ring would make the cigar look better. The construction feels good. The cigar has a strong aroma of hay, barnyard, and livestock smells.

The cold draw is great. There is a little bit of chocolate in the cold draw, but also leather. After lighting, the cigar has coffee, earthy notes, a bit of dark chocolate, hay, and pepper. The flavors evolve to salt and spices. The flavors change again. Leather, salt, wood, and pepper. The spice and wood get a little sweet note. The sweetness gets more pronounced with dark spices and wood. In the end, leather makes a comeback while the sweetness disappears.

The draw is fantastic. Lanceros are not only one of the most difficult vitolas to smoke, they are also one of the most difficult cigars to roll. This one is fantastic, kudos to the torcedor. The ash is light in color, dense, and firm. The burn is straight as an arrow and slow. The smoke is thick and white. Plentiful too. This cigar is medium in body and medium in flavor. It starts without balance, but halfway that balance is rectified. The smoke time is two hours and thirty minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? I need a few more to make up my mind about this cigar.

Categories: Nicaraguan cigars

Kristoff Vengeance Toro

Kristoff Vengeance Toro. A cigar introduced in 2018, even though the name is much older. The name was discontinued in 2011, but the blend wasn’t. The old Vengeance blend is now the Kristoff GC Signature Series. Ministry of Cigars reviewed that cigar before. But the name was put on ice for seven years while Kristoff was focussing on further building the brand on the global market.

In 2018 the brand was re-introduced. But since the original blend is still in use, it came with a new blend. A dark Connecticut Broadleaf wrapper over an Indonesian binder. Nicaraguan and Dominican tobaccos are used as filler. The Kristoff Vengeance is available as a 6½x60 Perfecto, 6×60 Gordo, 5×50 Robusto, and a 6¼x54 Toro. The last size is the one that is being reviewed.

The cigar looks scary. The very dark wrapper. The black ring with the silver-colored print. The oiliness of the wrapper. The closed foot and the rugged pigtail. This cigar just looks intimidating. The construction feels good. The strong aroma has hints of a barnyard, oak, charred wood, and roasted coffee beans.

The cold draw is surprisingly loose. Usually, a closed foot will give some issues in the cold draw. There is a fresh woody flavor in the cold draw. Once lit it has sweet, yet strong, coffee. The mouthfeel is dry, with coffee, nuts, a little black pepper. A hint of milk chocolate shows up too, with more black pepper. There is some sweetness of dried fruit. Acidity shows up with wood. Almost like red wine vinegar. The cigar mellows out when it comes to dynamics. Wood, earthiness, leather with black pepper, and a hint of milk chocolate are what remain in the first third. The chocolate slowly gets stronger, just as the sweetness. There is still a lot of wood, supported by earthiness, leather, and dried fruits. In the final third, there is nuttiness behind the chocolate. All with wood, black pepper, and earthiness as supporting flavors. Coffee returns.

The draw is fantastic. The pepper and salt colored ash has thick rings but it is firm. There are copious amounts of thick, white smoke. The burn is good. The cigar isn’t as strong as the looks. It’s medium to full-bodied. Medium to full-flavored as well. The smoke time is three hours and thirty minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? I would pick the GC series. This is good, but the GC Signature series fit my profile better.

Categories: Nicaraguan cigars | Tags: , , , , ,

Mombacho Liga Maestro Gordo

Mombacho Liga Maestro Gordo. The Mombacho Liga Maestro was first released in 2013 or 2014, just for the international markets. In 2015, ten tobacconists in the United States were selected to sell the cigar as a limited edition. It was such a success, that a year later the line was released on the American market as well. That was nine years after Mombacho Cigars was born. Cameron Heaps took Spanish lessons in Granada. He met the family that owned a cigar factory. They shared their secrets, and with partner Markus Raty, Heaps founded Mombacho Cigars.

Even though this size is called Gordo, it’s shorter and thinner than what the market sees as a gordo. Usually, a Gordo means 6×60, yet the Mombacho Liga Maestro Gordo is 5×54. It’s more of a Robusto Extra size. As all Mombacho cigars, this is a Nicaraguan puro. The wrapper is Nicaraguan Sun Grown Habano.

The cigar looks fantastic. A dark, almost Maduro wrapper. There are a few minor veins, but with the darkness of the wrapper and the rings, it gives the cigar character. The rings are beautiful as well. Matte gold on black, simple, classic, but tasteful. The cigar feels well constructed. The aroma is strong. Charred wood, barnyard, and forest smells.

The cold draw is a little on the tight side. The flavor is pure raw tobacco, nothing else. Maybe some black pepper on the lips, but that’s it. Once lit the cigar surprises. Due to the dark appearance, a strong smoke was expected. Yet the flavors are soft and smooth. Some creamy coffee, a little spice, some earthiness, but all soft. Those flavors are immediately followed by leather, cedar, and walnuts. There is also a savory sweetness, even though that sounds contradictory. The black pepper from the cold draw shows up. Cedar gets a little stronger as well. The sweetness moves more to honey. The leather creates a dry mouthfeel. The second third starts with peppery cookies, spiced shortcrust cookies with the name spekulaas. Every few puffs there is a hint of chocolate. There are a little honey sweetness and citrus acidity as well. Right before the cigar goes into the final third, a little salty peanut flavor shows up. With pepper, wood, leather. The mouthfeel is dry yet creamy. The sweetness completely disappeared. The sweetness returns later on though. The chocolate still shows up every few puffs. Then the cigar takes a turn toward different woods, with pepper and a mild nutty flavor.

The draw is fine. The burn is great, at a certain moment it looked crooked but it corrected itself. The smoke is decent in volume and thickness. The light-colored ash is firm, very firm. The medium to medium-full bodied cigar is smooth. Yet it fails to grab the attention due to a lack of character. The flavors are medium-full. The smoke time is three hours.

Would I buy this cigar again? Once in a while

Categories: Casa Favilli, Mombacho, Nicaraguan cigars | Tags: , , ,

Hiram & Solomon Traveling Man Lancero

Hiram & Solomon Traveling Man Lancero. Like all names in the Hiram & Solomon portfolio, this cigar gets his name from the freemason world as well. The ‘traveling man’ name stems from the ancient masonry. Master masons were often required to move from job to job over long distances. And when in a new area, local masons or the local lodge would vouch for such a ‘traveling man’. Fouad Kashouty and George Dakrat use the Plasencia Cigars factory in Esteli, Nicaragua for all the Hiram & Solomon lines. That includes this traveling man, the online Hiram & Solomon line with a Lancero in the line-up

This blend is made with tobaccos from four countries. The wrapper and binder are from South East Asia. From Indonesia. And if you want to get even more precise, from Sumatra where the Dutch introduced tobacco over four centuries ago. And later, the Sumatra seeds would be introduced into Cameroon to become the legendary Cameroon tobacco. The filler comes from the Dominican Republic and Brazil. Arapiraca from Brazil is used. Habano from Nicaragua is the last component in the blend. The Nicaraguan tobacco comes from Jalapa near the Honduran border and the volcanic island of Ometepe. The lancero is 7×38, but last year I reviewed the 6×60 Gran Toro.

Just because of the vitola, this cigar looks elegant. Skinny, long, a lancero is always beautiful. Add a purple, silver, and black ring and you have a cigar that stands out. The wrapper is a Colorado colored Indonesian Sumatra wrapper. To the eye and the touch, the wrapper is dry. The veins are thin. The cigar feels well constructed. The aroma is of charred wood, medium in strength.

The cold draw is a bit tight. It leaves a spicy raw tobacco flavor on top of the palate. Once lit, the cigar releases sweetness, floral notes, and cedar. There is also some spice. The spice slowly gets stronger. Nutmeg and a little pepper, but all covered in a very nice sweetness. Slowly leather and soil join the party, with the return of cedar. The floral flavors are still around. Everything is well balanced and smooth. At the end of the first third, there is also some chocolate. Milk chocolate to be more precise. With the leather, spice, and pepper. But all subtle. The second third also brings a faint vanilla flavor with a little freshness. A little later a fresh, green, grassy flavor is noticeable. The pepper gets a little stronger without overpowering the other flavors. It all remains very balanced and subtle.

The draw is very good. The length of the cigar cools the smoke down, making it very pleasant to smoke. The burn is straight. The ash is almost white. But due to the small ring gauge, the ash breaks easily. The cigar is smooth and balanced. The cigar has depth and nice complexity. The smoke time is two hours fifteen minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? I want a box or two boxes.

Categories: 93, Hiram & Solomon, Nicaraguan cigars, Tabacalera del Oriente | Tags: , , , ,

Barreda O21 Toro

Barreda O21 Toro. Until a year ago, this brand wasn’t on our radar. We had never heard from it. But at Intertabac 2019, we met Oscar & Stephanie from Barreda Cigars. Barreda Cigars is a small boutique factory in Esteli, Nicaragua. They provided us with a few samples. We reviewed and liked Don Chico Ecuador. Art Garcia’s Antigua Esteli is made at the Barreda factory as well. That cigar also scored high when we reviewed it.

The next cigar from Barreda is this O21. It comes in three sizes, we have the 6×52 Toro. It’s made with Nicaraguan fillers. The binder comes from Indonesia. The wrapper is Ecuadorian Habano, Sun Grown. The cigars come in boxes of 21. Another play with the O21 name. You have to be 21 to legally smoke a cigar in many American states and many other countries around the world.

The cigar looks good, very good. A dark, oily wrapper. Smooth, almost no veins. The triple cap looks great. But the color on the wrapper makes the cigar look cheap, to be honest. The purple and silver just don’t work on this cigar. The name is good though, as in many countries or states you have to be 21 to smoke. The cigar has a good aroma of hay, straw, and barnyard.

The cold draw is great. The flavors in the cold draw are vegetal with coarse black pepper. Once lit, the cigar releases a mild coffee flavor, creamy but also with some leather. The cigar slowly moves towards more wood and earthiness but still with creamy coffee. The next flavor that shows up is honey roasted almonds. Sweet yet roasted nuts. The second third starts with coffee, honey, black pepper, leather, and earthiness. Those flavors remain until the finale when pepper becomes the main flavor.

The construction is good. Good draw, good burn. Nice white yet coarse ash. Enough smoke, and it’s thick enough too. The cigar is balanced, smooth yet could use a little more character. This is a medium-bodied and medium flavored cigar. The smoke time is two hours and thirty minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? I would pick the Don Chico Habano/Ecuador if I smoke another Barreda.

Categories: 90, Barreda, Nicaraguan cigars, Tabacalera Barreda | Tags: , , ,

The Circus Maduro Lancero

The Circus Maduro Lancero. Late last year, Daniel Guerrero from El Viejo Continente announced the release of a lancero in The Circus line. A Maduro lancero with a Mexican San Andres Maduro wrapper over Nicaraguan binder and filler tobaccos from Ometepe and Jalapa. But information on that cigar is hard to find. There is no mention on the website of American Caribbean Cigars, the website of the factory. Nor on the website of El Viejo Continente, which could use an update in our opinion anyway. Both websites offer little to none information on the blends, availability, news, reviews, or any other information that can be useful. We feel that a better website and better accessible information would really help the brand.

The cigars are made at American Caribbean Cigars, a factory once almost acquired by Gurkha Cigars. The series is a tribute to all the people that worked with master blender Daniel Guerrero during the creation of this cigar. It took Guerrero and his people four years to make the blend. The first four sizes were named with the team in mind. The Magician represents the ingenuity of the team where the Harlequin is the fact of always wanting to make it. The Twister stands for the knowledge and the know-how of the blenders. And the Canon is the final shot, an explosion of flavors. The lancero is not part of the original release vitolas.

The cigar looks good. The Maduro wrapper is almost black. It’s oily with a few thin, sharp veins. The red foot band and the red with gold label are a beautiful contrast with the darkness of the wrapper. A nice pigtail finishes the look. The ring has a picture of a circus tent to keep the theme alive. The cigar feels well made. The aroma has a reminiscence of hay and is quite strong.

No complaints about the cold draw. It’s good, with a gingerbread flavor. After lighting there is some coffee, but most striking is the buttercream flavor. Old fashioned buttercream with a hint of vanilla. Although the vanilla only shows up in the retrohale. The sweetness of the Maduro wrapper shines through in this blend, but there is also a hint of white pepper. Slowly a grassy flavor shows up too, with some citrus. The earthiness and dark chocolate show up too, with leather, while the buttercream and vanilla fade. Slowly a dried leaf flavor shows up too while the grass is gone. After a third, the mouthfeel is thick and oily. The cigar now moves into a flavor profile of dark wood, forest soil, and leather with some black pepper. The cigar gets more earthy with coffee. Near the end, the cigar has some chocolate, coffee, wood, and spices.

The draw is great. The smoke is full and thick. The light gray ash isn’t very firm though and breaks easily. The burn is straight. The flavors are balanced. This is a medium-bodied and medium flavored cigar, balanced, with evolution. The smoke time is three hours. It could have lasted longer, but the cigar turned bitter.

Would I buy this cigar again? I enjoyed it a lot, so yes


Categories: 91, American Caribbean Tobacco S.A., Cigars by brand, Nicaraguan cigars, The Circus | Tags: , , , ,

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