Nicaraguan cigars

La Sagrada Familia Maduro Robusto Extra

La Sagrada Familia Maduro Robusto Extra. The second blend of the Dutch cigar brand La Sagrada Familia. Dutch cigar enthusiast Tom Mulder fell in love with cigars on a trip to Cuba. Back home he became a regular at the Van Dalen Cigars shop in Den Bosch where he met Sasja van Horssen. After many years of friendship, Mulder approached Van Horssen with a question. That question was “can you introduce me to cigar manufacturers that can produce a cigar for me?”.

Mulder and Van Horssen talked to Juan Martinez from Joya de Nicaragua. And with Joya on board as a manufacturer, Mulder flew to Nicaragua. The first blend, a Habano version, was a success. It sells well in The Netherlands so a second blend was waiting to happen. And it is this La Sagrada Familia Maduro. Made with filler from Esteli, Nicaragua. Add a Dominican binder and an Ecuadorian Habano Maduro wrapper, and you have the La Sagrada Familia Maduro line. I did review the pre-release many years ago.

The cigar looks good. A slightly rough, yet evenly dark wrapper. Oily and a bit weathered under the scorching sun during the growing process. The black, gold, and white ring pop on the dark background. The aroma is deep and strong. Complex barnyard aromas. The triple cap is perfect. The cigar feels packed, hard.

The cold draw is good, with a mild honey flavor and a little kick in the aftertaste. The first flavors are dark, earthy, and leathery with the bitterness of dark chocolate. But not the flavor of dark chocolate. And there’s a hint of white pepper. The pepper gains power, and some honey supports it in the background. At the end of the first third, there is a bit of a liquor flavor, almost like rum-soaked dark chocolate. The Maduro sweetness kicks in during the second third. But not overwhelmingly. Nicely balanced with spice, wood, and leather. There’s even a milk chocolate flavor noticeable. The flavors become more complex. Wood, hay, chocolate, leather, and spices. Wood becomes the main flavor, with hay, white pepper, and honey.

Due to the thickness of the wrapper and the fact that the cigar is packed, it takes a little effort to get the burn going. But once it goes, it’s beautifully straight and slow. And the draw is fine, even though the cigar feels hard. The ash is light in color and firm. Not firm enough to survive a drop from the ashtray on the desk though. But that’s a user error, not a cigar error. The smoke is good. The strength is medium-full, just as the flavor. The smoke time is three hours.

Would I buy this cigar again? I liked it, but I like the Habano blend better.

Categories: 91, Fabrica de Tabacos Joya de Nicaragua, La Sagrada Familia, Nicaraguan cigars | Tags: , , , , | Leave a comment

Liga Privada Unico Year of the Rat

Liga Privada Unico Year of the Rat. Last year I reviewed another Liga Privada Year of the Rat, but that had nothing to do with the Chinese Zodiac calendar. This one does, as it’s a limited edition specifically created for the year. The original comes from 2016 and has a connection to ice hockey and a Drew Estate Cigar Lounge in a hockey stadium.

The 5½x46 Liga Privada Unico Year of the Rat hails from Nicaragua. From La Gran Fabrica Drew Estate. It follows the same recipe as the other Liga Privada cigars, yet with different crops, vintages, or different tobaccos. So the wrapper is Connecticut grown broadleaf. The binder is Brazilian Mata Fina. The filler comes from Honduras and Nicaragua. But by using different crops, or different quantities of each kind of tobacco, the blend is unique.

At first glance, there is not a lot of cigar to see. Only the top inch, with the flag tail, is visible. The rest of the cigar, below the classic Liga Privada ring, is covered with gold foil. The foot is covered with a blue and golden Limited 2020 Edition ring. When the gold foil is gone, a very dark, almost black wrapper is shown. Leathery looking with a big vein. The wrapper is oily and delicious looking even though it’s rough. The construction feels good. The barnyard aroma is very strong.

The cold draw is fine, with an earthy flavor. That earthiness, combined with herbs and sweetness, is the first taste after lighting the cigar. This blend is smoother than the ones in the sampler. There is a hint of charred wood. But in combination with earthiness, leather, spices, and a little bit of pepper. The dark spices slowly take control without becoming overpowering. Cinnamon, nutmeg, cloves, those flavors. The flavors are quite smooth and this blend seems more subtle than other Liga Privada blends. After a third coffee becomes the strongest flavor. Sweetness is getting stronger as well. In the final third, there is more strength and character. That comes with darker flavors, such as a hint of dark chocolate, pepper, and dark spices. The finally is more peppery with some nuttiness.

I left my office to grab a bottle of water, and when I looked back I saw the office filled with smoke. That’s what a Drew Estate cigar does. The smoke is thick, white, and plentiful. The draw is smooth and the ash is white. The burn is straight. This cigar seems smoother and more subtle than other Liga Privada cigars. It’s medium to medium-full in body, full in flavor. The smoke time is two hours and thirty minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? If I could, I would. This is everything I want in a cigar. Flavor, balance, elegance, character.

Categories: 93, Gran Fabrica Drew Estate, Liga Privada, Nicaraguan cigars | Tags: ,

My Father Ilja VIII A

My Father Ilja VIII A. I hardly ever publish reviews on Wednesday. But this review has to be published on a special day, to commemorate Ilja van Horssen. Ilja van Horssen was a third-generation tobacconist, one of the founders of the largest independent premium cigar importer in The Netherlands. And before his death at age 36, he was the owner of the Cuesta Rey Cigar Shop (now La Casa del Habano The Hague) and G. De Graaff. In the first ten years after his passing, his brother Sasja released 36 boxes of rare or hard-to-find cigars. He would sell them at cost, and donate the proceeds to charity. Only if you were invited to a special night you could buy a box.

The first 7 editions were hard to find cigars, but for the 8th installment, a special blend was created. And here’s where it gets personal for me. At that time I was working for Longfiller Company and during a trip to Nicaragua, I asked My Father Cigars if they could create a small batch for this cause. Being very close to his family and knowing the meaning, brought tears to Jaime’s eyes. He was honored to be asked and a few months later the test blends arrived at our office. All the cigars are from the hands of Jaime or Don Pepin, they took care of the full production The blend is a secret. Personally, I smoked a few bundles of the remaining stock, for this review I’m breaking my box. And the review is published today as marks the 15th year since Ilja’s passing.

The cigar looks good. A nice dark and oily cigar. With a little sparkle from the minerals in the wrapper. The construction feels great. The ring has the face of Ilja van Horssen, with a cigar. And lots of gold. The sheer size of the cigar alone makes it impressive. There isn’t much aroma after six years of aging.

The cold draw is perfect, with a little salt, spice, and mint. Coffee, leather, and sweet chocolate come to mind after lighting the cigar. There is also a hint of salt, with some pepper. There is a nice umami flavor as well. The chocolate gets a bit more pronounced, with some pepper and wood. But the pepper is mellow. This cigar is considerably more mellow than it was six years ago. But the flavor profile remains the same. For an old review, visit CigarGuide. A little lime acidity shows up, with some wood. The retrohale gives smooth dark spices. The second third starts smoothly and full of balance. A perfect mixture of wood, spice, coffee, chocolate, and lime. And a creamy sweetness of condensed milk. The pepper is smooth but has the profile of red chili flakes. More softwood, dark spices, pepper show up halfway. There is also a little nut flavor, macadamia. Sweetness picks up, dark sugar. The cigar is also a bit meaty, with that umami flavor. The flavor profile is much like the profile six years ago but mellower. Wood and pepper are getting stronger in the final third. There is still a hint of coffee as well. Even now the cigar is easy to retrohale. Coffee with condensed milk is getting stronger, with a good dose of pepper. Slightly creamy.

The draw is phenomenal. The smoke could be a little thicker, but the blueish color is very nice. Although the smoke is getting thicker along the way. The burn is great. The light-colored ash isn’t firm, it breaks off easily. The cigar is smooth and balanced. Medium in body and flavor. The smoke time is four and a half hours.

Would I buy this cigar again? That’s impossible.

Categories: 93, My Father, My Father Cigars, Nicaraguan cigars | Tags: ,

Liga Privada #T52 Flying Pig

Liga Privada #T52 Flying Pig. The fifth and last cigar from the Liga Privada Year of the Rat sampler for the Chinese zodiac Year of the Rat. I reviewed a lot of Year of the Rat cigars, but not this sampler. The complete sampler went up in smoke. The Liga Privada Nasty Fritas went up in smoke earlier, just as the Ratzilla, the Velvet Rat, and the #9 Flying Pig.

After the success of the Liga Privada #9 Flying Pig, Drew Estate decided to release the Liga Privada T52 Flying Pig a year later. The name comes from Jonathan Drew. When he went to Nicaragua to make cigars, people said “he will be successful when pig fly”. So when Drew Estate was successful, JD named a cigar after the disbelievers. The wrapper comes from Connecticut. It’s a Sun Grown Habano that’s been stalk cut. It means that the whole plant is cut and dried, instead of individual leaves. Brazilian Mata Fina makes the binder. The filler is from Honduras and Nicaragua.

As with the Liga Privada #9 Flying Pig, or for that matter any flying pig in the Undercrown line as well, the cool shape gives the cigar bonus points for looks. Drew Estate makes two Flying Pigs and one Feral Flying Pig for the Liga Privada series. Undercrown has three, Sungrown, Shade, and Maduro. The wrapper is even darker and oilier than the #9, with the same leathery, toothy look. The ring is the same design but the gray is brown and the silver logo is copper now. The cigar feels hard but evenly hard. The aroma is slightly dusty with hay, almost like an empty hay shed after the winter.

The cold draw is fine. Once lit the cigar gives coffee, earthiness, dark chocolate, and leather. Dark flavors. The cigar remains earthy and dark, with a hint of dark chocolate. But some spice and sweetness come in as well. The mouthfeel is warm and pleasant. Comforting almost. The retrohale gives notes of roasted nuts. After a third, there is a slight acidity with the earthiness and coffee. There’s also some pepper, but mellow and in the background. The flavors are complex. There is a slight bitterness that hints at dark chocolate or durian without the dark chocolate or durian flavor. Dark spices and pepper are lingering around the corner. Coffee isn’t far gone either. The mouthfeel is turning creamy. The sweetness gains strength, but smokey with an almost meaty mouthfeel. The smoke feels thick, almost textured. With nice barbecue spices. Near the end, the cigar gets more pepper but with a minty aftertaste.

It’s hard to keep the cigar lit in the beginning. But that gets better after half an inch. But once the cigar is burning, it is on. The smoke fills the office and the extraction fan works overtime. The draw is great. The ash is dense and firm. This is an interesting cigar with complex aromas. It is full-bodied and full of flavor. The smoke time is three hours.

Would I smoke this cigar again? I prefer a slightly thinner ring gauge.

Categories: 92, Gran Fabrica Drew Estate, Liga Privada, Nicaraguan cigars | Tags: , , , , ,

Hiram & Solomon Entered Apprentice Robusto

Hiram & Solomon Entered Apprentice Robusto. The mildest of all the Hiram & Soloman cigars. Their entry-level cigar so to say. And named after the first degree of the masonry to make it fit. The Entered Apprentice, Fellowcraft, and Master Mason are the three degrees, and also the three core lines for Hiram & Solomon. The cigars are available in four different vitolas and in many countries around the world. The Hiram & Solomon Entered Apprentice Toro was the subject of a Philip & Ferdy Cigar Show episode.

The cigars hail from Nicaragua. From the Plasencia cigars factory. As the intention for this cigar is to be entry-level, Hiram & Solomon went for a Connecticut Shade wrapper. But not from Connecticut or Ecuador, where most Connecticut Shade wrappers come from. They got the wrapper from Honduras. The binder also comes from Honduras. For the filler, tobaccos from three countries are used. Rare tobacco from Paraguay, tobacco from Pennsylvania, United States. And the last piece of the puzzle is Habano from the Nicaraguan island of Ometepe.

The cigar looks good. The wrapper isn’t as pale as most Connecticut Shade cigars. There is one thick, unsightly vein on the side though. The ring with the Freemason logo is beautiful though. Blue and black with silver. The foot band mentions the line, Entered Apprentice. The cigar feels a bit soft. The triple cap is perfect. The aroma is mild. It smells a bit like a petting zoo.

The cold draw is a bit on the loose side. There is a mild minty flavor with some cedar. The first puff is sweet and bitter. Sugar and young wood, but with that classic Connecticut Shade old book flavor not far away. The sweetness remains and there is a hint of vanilla. The young wood changes to cedar and there is a bit of a moist mushroom flavor. There is no harshness nor pepper, so the retrohale is very pleasant. After a third, a mild nutty flavor shows up. Still with that Connecticut Shade mustiness lingering on the background. The sweetness remains and black pepper shows up. Still with cedar and that slight musty flavor. The pepper slowly gains strength, wood is still around with some leather. And that Connecticut Shade signature mustiness, although it is mild.

The ash is white, dense, and firm. The burn is slow and straight. The draw is good. The smoke is fine in volume and thickness. The cigar is medium in body and strength. The flavor is medium to medium-full. The cigar has some character and the Connecticut Shade mustiness is pretty mild on this one. The smoke time is two hours.

Would I buy this cigar again? No, there are better Hiram & Solomon cigars out there. But for a Connecticut Shade wrapper, this isn’t a bad cigar.

Categories: 89, Hiram & Solomon, Nicaraguan cigars, Tabacos de Oriente Nicaragua | Tags: , , , ,

Liga Privada #9 Flying Pig

Liga Privada #9 Flying Pig. The fourth cigar from the Liga Privada Year of the Rat sampler for the Chinese zodiac Year of the Rat. I smoked several year of the rat cigars during the year of the rat. But this sampler wasn’t in my possession back then. It is now, so I will smoke the complete sampler now.

The unique shape of this cigar comes from an old, turn of the century, cigar catalog. Steve Saka, then CEO of Drew Estate, found that and decided to use it. The Liga Privada #9 blend is connected to Saka, as it was blended for him as well. He is the jefe mentioned on the ring. The cigar has a Connecticut Broadleaf wrapper from the United States. The binder is Brazilian Mata Fina. The filler comes from Nicaragua and Honduras. This fat, short perfecto measures 4⅛x60.

Even after more than a decade, this weird looking cigar stands out. Short and fat, but in a perfecto shape with a pigtail. The wrapper is dark and it contrasts the simple black, silver, and white ring. The wrapper is dark and rough, but it fits the shape. Leathery and toothy, like the previous Liga Privada cigars that Ministry of Cigars reviewed. The construction feels good. The cigar has a medium-strong cedar aroma.

The cold draw is good. With a slightly wooden flavor. After lighting the cigar releases leather, earthiness, coffee, and wood. There is also some acidity and a little bit of dark chocolate. The cigar turns more to coffee and soil but with a little hay and a tiny splash of pepper. The chocolate remains and becomes thick and sticky in the mouth. There’s also a nice dose of pepper in the background. Halfway the cigar gives more wood, earthiness even though there is still a coffee flavor with pepper. Chocolate makes a comeback. And even though there is pepper in the flavor profile, it remains subtle so far. Then a honey sweetness shows up as well. Wood, coffee, and chocolate are getting stronger

The blueish smoke is of epic proportions. But that’s the case with every Liga Privada or the related Undercrown. Due to the thickness of the wrapper, the burn has a few issues staying even. The ash is light colored but turns brownish. It’s frayed but firm. This is a cigar full in body, and medium-full in flavor. The cigar is well balanced. The cigar is perfect to smoke to the nub with a nub-tool. The smoke time is two hours and forty-five minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? I like it, but I rather smoke a Ratzilla or Velvet Rat

Categories: 91, Gran Fabrica Drew Estate, Liga Privada, Nicaraguan cigars | Tags: , , ,

El Viejo Continente Maduro Lancero

El Viejo Continente Maduro Lancero. El Viejo Continente is the brand of Daniel Guerrero. A life long cigar enthusiast who partnered up with Emiliano Lagos to create cigars to his likings. And that’s how El Viejo Continente was born. There are several lines available, in several sizes. But Guerrero is also responsible for The Circus cigars.

The cigars come from Esteli, Nicaragua. From American Caribbean Cigars, a factory that made and makes cigars for Carlos Toraño, Gurkha, and Leccia. But also for El Viejo Continente and a few lines they own themselves. The El Viejo Continente Maduro line consists of Nicaraguan filler tobacco. The binder is Habano from Ecuador. The wrapper is Mexican. From San Andres, but that’s almost a given when it’s Mexican Maduro.

This cigar isn’t a looker. The Mexican San Andres Maduro wrapper looks rough. But it has sparkles of the minerals from the rich soil and that’s always a good sign. The silver and gray ring matches the darkness of the wrapper. The construction feels good. The aroma is strong and is a mixture of hay and chocolate.

The cold draw is perfect. With a herbal flavor, including mint. The first puffs are coffee and sugar. Then leather shows up with a hint of herbal spice. And there is also cocoa powder, dry but nice. The flavor changes are nuanced and subtle. After a third, the cocoa or dark chocolate flavor gets stronger, with a slight metallic undertone and some black pepper. Halfway some grassy and hay flavors join the spicy cocoa. The mouthfeel is a little creamy. The retrohale reveals more spice and a little wood. The final third is stronger with more pepper and more of an edge. It’s no longer pleasant to retrohale due to the pepper. The cocoa disappears and wood is more pronounced.

The draw is great. The light-colored ash breaks easily though, no long cones with this cigar. The burn is good, although smoking a lancero is a balancing act. Smoke it slow enough to prevent the cigar from getting too hot and thus bitter. And smoke it fast enough so you don’t have to relight it often. That last part failed a few times, but it’s a user error and not a cigar error. The cigar is smooth yet has a bit of an edge that gives it character. The smoke is decent. The smoke time is two hours and thirty-five minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? I love lancero sizes so yes

Categories: 90, American Caribbean Tobacco S.A., El Viejo Continente, Nicaraguan cigars | Tags: , , , ,

Liga Privada Velvet Rat

Liga Privada Velvet Rat. The third cigar from the Liga Privada Year of the Rat sampler for the Chinese zodiac Year of the Rat. I smoked a lot of Year of the Rat cigars during the Year of the Rat. But this sampler wasn’t in our possession back then. It is now, so the complete sampler will go up in smoke. The Liga Privada Nasty Fritas went up in smoke earlier, just as the Ratzilla.

The cigar is the exact same size as the Liga Privada Unico Ratzilla, which we reviewed a few days ago. But the wrapper is different, even though it comes from the same area. The Connecticut Broadleaf wrapper is from higher priming, which means, from higher on the plant. And that equals to stronger, as these leaves are smaller and receive more sun during the growing period.

Just at first glance, you know this is a tasty cigar. A thick, beefy wrapper. Dark, toothy, and leathery with plenty of natural oils. The flag tail is a nice finishing touch to the looks. The simple ring allows the beautiful wrapper to be the center of attention. The construction feels good. A little hard, but evenly hard. The aroma is strong but has a surprising smell of an old wardrobe that hasn’t been opened for a few months. Mixed with some cedar that is.

The cold draw is a little on the easy side. It has an earthy flavor with some sweetness. The cigar has a herbal, spicy profile with a reminiscence of stock cubes. Add some white pepper and you’re there. A sugary sweetness is there as well, with some acidity to bind it all together. In the background, an earthy flavor is showing up. Soon to be followed by a hay flavor. The flavor in the retrohale is sweet but dusty. Slowly the cigar becomes more earthy with milk chocolate. But with a nice twang of citrus, balanced out by sweetness. After a third, the earthiness becomes the dominant flavor. The sweetness grows in strength but there is also some dark spice noticeable. Especially in the retrohale, nutmeg, and cinnamon. That milk chocolate flavor is still lingering in the background. The sweetness is almost raisin-like. The chocolate flavor changes to dark chocolate and becomes stronger. The sweetness turns to vanilla, and the pepper grows in strength. Suddenly there is a honey roasted peanut flavor, unusual but nice. With a balanced dose of pepper.

This is a Drew Estate cigar so the smoke is plentiful. The draw is great. There is not a single complaint about the straight burn either. The cigar is related to the Ratzilla, with the same earthiness. Yet there are subtle differences and this is more of a velvet smoke. So the name is chosen pretty well. The ash is light-colored. This is a cigar that is medium-full in both body and flavor. The smoke time is three hours

Would I buy this cigar again? Yes, I love this Liga Privada Velvet Rat

Categories: 92, Gran Fabrica Drew Estate, Liga Privada, Nicaraguan cigars | Tags: , , , ,

Liga Privada Unico Ratzilla

Liga Privada Unico Ratzilla. The second cigar from the Liga Privada Year of the Rat sampler for the Chinese zodiac Year of the Rat. I reviewed a series of Year of the Rat cigars. But this sampler wasn’t in my possession back then. It is now, so I will smoke this Drew Estate Liga Privada series of Year of the Rat cigars. The complete sampler will go up in smoke. The Liga Privada Nasty Fritas went up in smoke a few days ago.

The cigar is a 6¼x46 Corona Gorda. The wrapper comes from the Connecticut River Valley. It is grown under the full sun, making it a broadleaf wrapper. But as with any Liga Privada, the harvesting and curing of the tobacco are far from ordinary. Instead of each leaf picked by hand, the whole plant is chopped down. And then hung to dry. This method is called stalk-cutting. The binder is a sweet Brazilian Mata Fina. The filler comes from Nicaragua and the neighbor to the north, Honduras.

The cigar looks good. A thick, leathery, dark, and toothy wrapper. The flag tail is a nice finishing touch. The classic Liga Privada ring is simple yet tasteful. The construction feels good. The cigar has a slight wooden aroma, like fresh sawdust.

The cold draw is fine, with a mild spicy taste. After lighting, the cigar gives sweet coffee with red pepper. The flavor palate evolves to leather with cedar, mildly sweet yet with a spicy edge. Complex and interesting. The cigar is surprisingly mellow, with hints of gingerbread. It’s not a Liga Privada powerhouse, even though it’s not tame either. The base flavor turns to earthiness. The sweetness tastes almost like honey. After a third, there is more earthiness with milk chocolate, slightly creamy. The flavor profile remains a mixture of earthiness, leather, wood with some spices and pepper. In the final third, the sweetness gains some strength. But it’s still a very earthy cigar. Coffee makes a comeback though. Earthiness is by far the prominent flavor, without overpowering the dark spices, sweetness, leather, and pepper. The balance is great, resulting in a smooth smoke. The final puffs have a little more sweetness and a little more pepper.

The cold draw is fine, with a mild spicy taste. After lighting, the cigar gives sweet coffee with red pepper. The flavor palate evolves to leather with cedar, mildly sweet yet with a spicy edge. Complex and interesting. The cigar is surprisingly mellow, with hints of gingerbread. It’s not a Liga Privada powerhouse, even though it’s not tame either. The base flavor turns to earthiness. The sweetness tastes almost like honey. After a third, there is more earthiness with milk chocolate, slightly creamy. The flavor profile remains a mixture of earthiness, leather, wood with some spices and pepper. In the final third, the sweetness gains some strength. But it’s still a very earthy cigar. Coffee makes a comeback though. Earthiness is by far the prominent flavor, without overpowering the dark spices, sweetness, leather, and pepper. The balance is great, resulting in a smooth smoke. The final puffs have a little more sweetness and a little more pepper.

The draw is great and the smoke, well, it is a Drew Estate cigar. The burn is beautiful and slow. This cigar is medium-full. Both in flavor and body. It is well balanced. The light-colored ash is dense. The smoke time is three hours.

Would I buy this cigar again? Yes, I love it

Categories: 92, Gran Fabrica Drew Estate, Nicaraguan cigars | Tags: , , , ,

Muestra de Tabac Trifecta Double Claro Habano

Muestra de Tabac Trifecta Double Claro Habano. The third and final blend of the Muestra de Tabac Trifecta series. A big and thick perfecto with a dual wrapper. Not barberpole style but one wrapper on the bottom half, and one on the top half. Since both sides are cut, it is up to the smoker to decide what side to light. That makes this concept stand out from other dual wrapper cigars. Last year, I did reviews of the Muestra de Tabac green and black.

Patrick Potter is the blender of this cigar, but Joey Febre and Patrick Potter came up with the concept. The cigars come from the small factory Tabacalera La Perla in Esteli, Nicaragua. The patent of this concept is pending. The name is confusing though considering the popular Muestra de Saka cigars from Dunbarton Tobacco. Too close to comfort in our opinion. But that’s something for Tabac Trading Company to decide on.

The concept is great, but it forces the smoker to choose. What side to light, and what side to puff on. The Habano side is a little longer than the Candela side, so let’s light the Candela side. The ring is mirrored so it looks right whatever side you decide to light. The Habano wrapper is oily and leathery. The Double Claro side looks a bit dry and more delicate. The construction feels good. The cigar has a strong aroma of barnyard and hay.

The cold draw is great. There is a funny milk chocolate flavor in the cold draw, with spices. If you flip the cigar and cold draw the Double Claro side, the cigar has more of a dry hay flavor. Once lit, the flavors are dry. Dry wood, dry leaves, and dry leather. The dry mouthfeel continues, while the flavors change to licorice and cloves. The Candela leaf gives a bit of a grassy flavor, but the flavors are quite mild. There’s also a little acidity. Halfway, when the wrapper is almost changing, things pick up. There is a little more sweetness, some more cloves, some pepper. The grassy flavor is gone. The cigar is getting a little stronger. Once the Habano wrapper is reached. The cigar gets pepper and sweetness. But also a distinct flavor that is best described as dry autumn leaves. Leather returns, with a nice dose of underlying pepper. There’s also a little nuttiness that grows towards the end.

The draw is great. The light gray ash is quite firm. The smoke is good. The first part of the cigar, with the Candela wrapper, is mild. It’s not really captivating. The burn is decent and needed a touch-up once or twice. The second half of the cigar packs more flavor and strength. The difference in the wrapper is clearly noticeable. The smoke time is three hours and thirty minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? No, I don’t think so

Categories: 90, Muestra de Tabac, Nicaraguan cigars, Tabacalera La Perla | Tags: , , , , ,

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