Nicaraguan cigars

Sinistro the Last Cowboy Maduro Corona

Sinistro the Last Cowboy Maduro Corona. To be honest, up until less than a year ago, this brand was under our radar. We had seen the name mentioned a few times, but that’s about it. We didn’t see many pictures on social media, no reviews and therefore Sinistro didn’t catch our attention. But then Trent Firmin from Firmin Cigars in Australia started importing the brand. Of course, Ministry of Cigars published about that and we had to source information about Sinistro. Around Christmas, a package showed up from Australia with a Christmas present, a few cigars including this Sinistro Last Cowboy Maduro Corona.

The Sinistro cigars are produced at La Aurora, the oldest cigar factory in the Dominican Republic. For this blend, Piloto Cubana from the Dominican Republic is used as a filler. The binder is Mexican San Andres. The Maduro wrapper is USA grown Connecticut Broadleaf Maduro. There is also a Connecticut Shade version available, with a Cameroon binder. The cigar we review is the 5½x42 Corona

The cigar stands out. Not just by the ring gauge of 42, a size which has been overshadowed by bigger ring gauges in the last decade. But because of the foot of the cigar. The last half-inch is wrapped in Candela, and the foot is closed. The rest of the cigar has a rustic, dark, and oily Maduro leaf as the wrapper. The gray ring has the sketch of a cowboy with his six-shooters. The cigar feels well constructed. The aroma is pleasant, wood, straw, and cocoa powder.

The cold draw is a bit tight due to the closed foot. It’s pretty spicy and peppery, with a hint of chocolate. The cigar starts bitter, earthy, and musky. Slowly the cigar gets some sweetness and chocolate combined with the earthiness. Once the burn passed the Candela part of the wrapper, the flavors became more pleasant, less bitter. There is still a coffee bitterness, with earthiness but now the main flavor is wood. Oak to be more precise. The mouthfeel is creamy. The wood remains the dominant flavor, with some spice and toast. The wood is smooth in the retrohale. There is a hint of Maduro sweetness as well. The cigar grows in strength, without changing much of the flavor profile.

The ash is white, firm, and dense. The draw is fantastic. The smoke is thick and white. And there is plenty of it. The burn is fine. There is balance in the cigar, after the first centimeter. A good medium to a medium-full bodied and medium-full flavored cigar. It’s quite one-dimensional but if the flavor is good, that is not too much of an issue. The Sinistro the Last Cowboy Maduro Corona lasted an hour and forty minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? Yes, I will

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Luis Martinez Silver Selection Churchill

Luis Martinez Silver Selection Churchill. A brand with a history going back to 1876 when Don Luis Martinez opened his cigar factory in Cuba. And now, almost 150 years later, the brand still remains. Not as a Cuban brand though, but as part of the portfolio of J.C. Newman. And as a budget brand, both machine-made and hand-made. The machine-made cigars are produced in Tampa. The handmade cigars hail from J.C. Newman’s PENSA factory in Esteli, Nicaragua.


The Luis Martinez Silver Edition is the premium line of this budget-friendly brand. It is made in several different sizes, and some of the sizes come in beautiful glass tubes. Like this 7×48 Churchill. The blend consists of three year aged Nicaraguan and Honduran fillers. The binder comes from Nicaragua. The wrapper is a Sun Grown leaf from Ecuador.


The beautiful and colorful ring is on the outside of the glass tube. The cigar isn’t completely straight, that’s the first thing noticeable when taking the cigar out of the tube. The color of the wrapper is beautiful, but it feels and looks a bit dry. It’s not oily, but there aren’t any ugly veins. So looks-wise, this cigar isn’t good, but it’s not bad either. The aroma is bad though, think fish market mixed with urine. And all quite strong. My wife smelled the cigars and said “these stink like unwashed private parts”.


The cold draw is great and very peppery. A mix of white pepper and chili pepper. Once lit, it’s dark roast coffee, pepper, earthiness, and sourness. The first puffs aren’t promising much for the rest of the cigar. The sourness takes control, and it’s not a pleasant sourness. Some sweetness shows up too, but not enough to neutralize the sour flavor of the cigar. The sourness slowly tones down a little, giving the sweetness and the pepper some more space. Slowly a little wood flavor shows up as well. But the sour flavor, like milk that has gone bad, ruins everything. At the end of the first third, some vanilla shines through. Which is an improvement? The second third is less sour. It starts with a sweet, old book taste and wood. Sweet chocolate comes in play halfway in the cigar. It’s not as bad anymore. There are hints of citrus and vanilla as well. Near the end, pepper grows.


The draw is great. Construction-wise there is nothing wrong with this cigar. The light-colored ash is pretty, yet not too firm. The smoke is plenty in volume, but not very thick. This is a cigar that directly competes with J.C. Newman’s best selling bundle cigar Quorum. It delivers the same, yet is more expensive than Quorum. As much as I love J.C. Newman, this cigar won’t get much love from us. It’s medium-bodied, medium flavored. The smoke time is a little over two hours.

Would I buy this cigar again? Hell no!

number86

Categories: 86, Luis Martinez, Nicaraguan cigars, PENSA | Tags: , , , , , | Leave a comment

Charatan Colina Robusto

Charatan Colina Robusto. The name Charatan might not be known to many cigar smokers unless you are familiar with the British market. Charatan is a brand founded in Britain, and only available there for now. The brand was founded by Frederick Charatan in 1863 as a pipe brand. He carved Meerschaum pipes and briar pipes. Frederik’s son Reuben took over the business and until 1960, it was a family business. Dunhill Tobacco of London acquired the brand and launched Charatan pipe tobaccos, which were a success. And in the early 21st century, Charatan cigars came on the market. These cigars were blended specifically to the preferences of the British cigar smokers. The brand quickly became the best selling new world cigar in the United Kingdom.


Fast forward, 2 years ago, the British tobacco distributor Tor Imports acquired the brand. The production was moved to Joya de Nicaragua and the blend was tweaked to attract a new generation of cigar smokers. Ministry of Cigars reviewed the new blend last year. Tor Imports also released a limited edition to commemorate the ownership. The Charatan Colina. And that name has a meaning. Colina means hill. Tor means hill. Add that Tor Imports is located on top of a hill in Devon, U.K., and you will see the significance of the name. The cigar is made in one size only, 5½x52, in limited production. The filler is all Nicaraguan. The binder and wrapper are Indonesian. Besuki for the binder, and shade-grown tobacco from Java as a wrapper.


The wrapper is dark for a shade-grown wrapper. The ring looks very much like a Davidoff ring, white with golden dots, but not as high quality as Davidoff. The logo has a unicorn, which embodies the craft and heritage of Charatan. It is a symbol of mythology, individuality, and as the national animal of Scotland – of quintessential Britishness. The wrapper is dark, Colorado Maduro colored with beautiful smudges. The triple cap is gorgeous, and the cigar feels well constructed. The cigar has a strong aroma. Green spices, stock cubes, that kind of aroma.


The cold draw is great. And once lit, the cigar is earthy, spicy with a little salt. The cigar remains slightly salty, with herbal flavors, a little coffee, and soil. There is a little bit of grass and sweetness too, that show up in the retrohale. The flavors are smooth, mellow, and balanced. The cigar slowly develops more of a spice flavor palate. Nutmeg, cinnamon, allspice., but with some earthiness, leather, and pepper. The sweetness becomes stronger, with a citrus sourness. There is also a slight nuttiness. The cigar gets more character, without losing the smoothness. More dry flavors, such as hay and dried wood. But still with the pepper, the spices, and the nuttiness. The final third starts sweet with nuts, pepper, and spices. The sweetness is like liquid sugar. The sweetness slowly evolves to marzipan though. With nuts, spices, pepper, leather, and wood.


The draw is great. The ash is like a stack of white and gray dimes. The smoke is good, blueish, and decent in volume and thickness. The burn is quite straight and slow. The cigar starts smooth, mellow, and well balanced but lacks character at first. That character shows up later, without losing the balance and smoothness. This is a medium-bodied cigar, medium-full flavored with an interesting evolution. The smoke time is three hours

Would I buy this cigar again? I want a box
number92

Categories: 92, Charatan, Fabrica de Tabacos Joya de Nicaragua, Nicaraguan cigars | Tags: , , , , | Leave a comment

Henk Maori Masterpiece

Henk Maori Masterpiece. Henk is a luxury brand, mostly focussed on suitcases and travel bags. But designer and owner Heiko Poerz is also an avid cigar smoker for over thirty years. With his eye for detail, his and his attitude to always go for the best, he was unhappy with the cigars that were on the market. Nothing reached perfection for his palate. So he asked his friend, master blender Didier Houvenaghel, for help to create a cigar that would be tailor-made for Poerz. Houvenaghel makes cigars at Tabacalera A.J. Fernandez, so automatically, Henk cigars would be made there as well. Houvenaghel and Poerz created a blend with vintage tobaccos. The tobacco is expensive, but since Poerz doesn’t compromise quality, he pushed on. His obsession with cigars also created a whole line of accessories, including the Cigarbone and the Minibone.


The Maori name is a tribute to a mutual friend of Poerz and Houvenaghel. The friend is Maori, and when the cigar was in the development stage, the three friends met up in Bali, Indonesia. Poerz jokingly mentioned that the wrapper had the same color as their friend’s skin. The line suddenly had a name, a tribute to their Maori friend. That resulted in a Maori style tattoo logo for the cigars, and names related to the Maori heritage such as the Haka. The Henk Maori Haka scored 94 and ended up on the 4th place of Ministry of Cigars Top 25 of 2019. The Henk Maori Masterpiece is a limited edition figurado. It measures 6½x64 and is made with vintage tobaccos from Nicaragua. The cigars were released in 2018, in very limited production. The cigars came in a travel humidor with 7 cigars, limited to 200 travel humidors. And 12 humidors with 52 cigars. There are also a limited number of refills and singles available.


The cigar looks amazing. The shape is fantastic, and the small pieces of Maduro wrapper on the foot and the head make the cigars pop. The unfinished head and the tattoo make this cigar stand out in any humidor. The wrapper is Colorado Maduro colored, dry and has some veins. Without the veins, the cigar would have hit 100 out of 100 points. It feels pretty packed but evenly packed. The dark manure smell is medium strong.


The cold draw is good. There is a hint of milk chocolate but also a lot of pepper in the cold draw. Straight from the start, there is coffee, slightly bitter but on a pleasant level. The draw is surprisingly good from the start. Usually, there is a bit of a tight draw until the burn reached the thicker part of the foot. There are herbal sweetness, pepper, and fresh leather flavors as well. The retrohale gives more spice and cedar. The cigar has a nutmeg and cinnamon sweetness. At the thickest part of the cigar, there is cedar, soil, pepper, and sugary sweetness. The cigar is very pleasant in the retrohale. Coffee and toast show up, still with the cedar, sweetness, pepper, and spices. The mouthfeel is creamy. The spices turn to gingerbread spices, with cedar, leather, sweetness, and pepper. The mouthfeel is still creamy. In the last third, the cigar picks up more strength. Retrohaling is no longer an option. Wood, leather, coffee, spices, and pepper are the main flavors.


The draw is amazing. The burn had to be corrected a few times though. There is a good amount of thick, white smoke. The ash is white and firm. This is a smooth, balanced, and flavorful cigar. But it packs strength too, even though it’s smooth and creamy. It is a full-bodied, full-flavored cigar. Balanced, smooth and full of character. The smoke time is three hours and twenty minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? For a very special occasion
number93

Categories: 93, Henk, Nicaraguan cigars, Tabacalera A.J. Fernandez | Tags: , , , , , , ,

Joya de Nicaragua Antano CT Robusto

Joya de Nicaragua Antano CT Robusto. In the United States, Joya de Nicaragua used to be known for the strong, bold cigars. Especially the Joya de Nicaragua Antaño lines carried that stigma. Both the Antaño and the Antaño Dark Corojo are on the fuller side of the spectrum. In Europe, Joya de Nicaragua made a name for itself with the milder Clasico line. But in the last few years, Joya de Nicaragua is releasing medium strong and mild cigars with the Joya Red, Silver, Black, and the Uno. And since last year, there is even a Connecticut Shade wrapped Joya de Nicaragua Antaño. The Joya de Nicaragua Antaño CT series. And Connecticut Shade is the exact opposite of a strong wrapper.


Last year, Joya de Nicaragua released the Antaño CT. With all Nicaraguan filler and a Nicaraguan binder. As the wrapper, an Ecuadorian Connecticut Shade was chosen. There are four sizes available, from the 6×54 Belicoso to the 5 ¼ x46 Corona Gorda. In between, you’ll find a 6×50 Toro and this 5×52 Robusto. Juan Martinez from Joya de Nicaragua gave me this cigar at the 2019 Intertabac trade show.


The cigar doesn’t look appealing due to the yellowish-brown color of the wrapper. There is a vein on the wrapper and the triple cap is sloppy. The ring makes up for it. Bright golden with red, clean and clear. The cigar feels well made. It’s evenly filled. The aroma is nice and strong. The cigar has a smell much like sawdust.


The cold draw is perfect, the ideal amount of resistance. And the flavor is strong, bold. Peppery raw tobacco, which is a promising sign. Once lit, there is sweetness, vinegar, and that classic Connecticut Shade mustiness with leather and sawdust. The cigar remains smooth with sweetness, mustiness, and leather. Slowly the wood is getting stronger and a little pepper shows up. The wood and sweetness now overpower that classic Connecticut Shade mustiness. There is also some hay in the flavor profile. The second third starts sweet with hints of dried leather, earthiness, spices, and pepper. The mouthfeel is creamy, something that is to be expected from a Connecticut Shade cigar. The final third has more pepper, but the sweetness remains the same. There is also a hint of milk chocolate.


The draw is phenomenal. The silver-gray ash is extremely dense. The smoke is thick, white and there is plenty of it. The burn is straight. This is a smooth cigar, medium-bodied and medium flavored. The smoke time is two hours

Would I buy this cigar again? It’s not bad for a Connecticut Shade, but I prefer different wrappers

number91

Categories: 91, Fabrica de Tabacos Joya de Nicaragua, Joya de Nicaragua, Nicaraguan cigars | Tags: , , , , ,

Mi Querida Triqui Traca 552

Mi Querida Triqui Traca 552. When Dunbarton Tobacco & Trust owner Steve Saka was asked to make a firecracker for 2 Guys Smokeshop, he obliged. He was not the first to make a 2 Guys exclusive limited-edition firecracker. The shop has one made annually, it’s always a 3×50 sized cigar with a long tail mimicking a firecracker. For the Mi Querida version of the firecracker, Saka tweaked the blend to be a little stronger. That cigar was a hit, and last year the blend was released as regular production in two sizes. A 5×52 Robusto and a 6×48 Toro. Out of respect for the 2 Guys smoke shop, Saka never released the original vitola.


But he kept a link to the original release. Firecrackers tied together are called Triqui Traca in Nicaraguan slang. And that’s the name of the new blend, Mi Querida Triqui Traca. The cigars are made at the NACSA factory, under the watchful eye of Raul Disla. The binder and filler are all Nicaraguan. The wrapper is a high-grade Connecticut Broadleaf from the United States. The cigars are available for Dunbarton Tobacco & Trust distributors worldwide.


The wrapper is thick, leathery, dark, and oily. It looks tasty. The elegant thin ring is firecracker red with a golden print. It’s the same as the original Mi Querida, except in another color. But if you look closely, there is embossing on the ring as well. Just by the looks, this cigar is going to be strong and tasty. The cigar feels well constructed, the cap is impeccable. The cigar has a strong aroma of wood and barnyard.


The cold draw is great. It has a dry taste of hay. The first puff is strong coffee with spices. There is a bitterness that comes close to dark chocolate, complex but without the chocolate flavor. There is also hay and sweetness. A little leather is noticeable in the retrohale. The sweetness grows a little, just as the hay and vegetable flavors. There is a hint of dark chocolate and some pepper as well. The pepper and leather pick up, with some hay. That all while the sweetness makes space for some herbs and spices. In the second third, the power picks up. More wood, leather, but also more dark chocolate and spices. There’s still pepper as well. It’s getting harder to retrohale. There are some hard to describe flavors as well, earthy, muddy but that is not precise enough. Halfway there’s also some walnut. In the final third, coffee returns. With earthy flavors, wood, pepper, and spices. The walnut flavor is lingering on the background. Some citrus acidity ties all the flavors together.


The draw is fantastic. The first third is smooth, balanced yet with character and complexity. Not as strong as suspected. The smoke is thick and full. The burn is straight and slow. The cigar has a great evolution and built up. It starts medium strong, smooth and balanced, and grows to a strong yet balanced and complex cigar. The smoke time is two hours and forty-five minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? I can’t wait to get my hands on more

number92

Categories: 92, Mi Querida, Nicaragua American Cigars S.A., Nicaraguan cigars | Tags: , , , , ,

Casa de Torres Especial 2020 Salomones

Casa de Torres Especial 2020 Salomones. For more than 20 years, the German cigar manufacturer August Schuster has been making Casa de Torres. Well, they don’t make them as they do with most of their other brands in Germany. But the have it made in an undisclosed factory in Nicaragua. And for the last few years, they launch an annual limited edition. For 2020, that limited edition is a Salomones.


The salomones measures 7 inches with a 54 ring. For the blend, Schuster decided on all Nicaraguan fillers. The binder comes from South East Asia, Indonesia to be more specific. And the wrapper is a Colorado Claro colored Connecticut from Ecuador. It is unclear how many boxes were produced.


The shape is amazing. The mild oily, Colorado Claro wrapper looks delicate. Like high grade yet thin leather. The cigar feels well made. And the double ring looks nice on this cigar. The blue, gold and white color scheme works well with the shade of the wrapper. The cigar has a pleasant aroma. Smells from a barnyard but mixed with spiced apple pie straight from the oven.


The cold draw is good. It leaves a very dry raw tobacco flavor with raisins on the palate. But there is also a little mustiness, which is a trademark for Connecticut Shade tobacco. After lighting, there is a lot of sweetness, dry cedar, and that mustiness. Some nutty flavor and pepper show up after a few puffs. The mustiness from the Connecticut wrapper is strong. On the other hand, the Connecticut wrapper gives a lot of cream as well. Slowly but surely, the nuttiness and cream push the mustiness to the background. There are still some cedar, leather, spice, and pepper flavors. At the end of the first third, there is cedar, pepper, spice, leather, and even some grass. All with a creamy mouthfeel. The mustiness makes a comeback with cedar, pepper, sugar, leather, and a little earthiness on top of the mild nutty and creamy flavors. The sweetness and the pepper take over in the last third. But there is also some coffee. The cigar is smooth enough to retrohale, even in the last part. The cigar gets a little salt as well, and a fruity flavor.


The draw is fine, even after cutting a very small bit of the cap. That left only a small smoke channel, yet the draw is good. The smoke is thick, white and there is plenty of it. The burn had to be corrected though. This cigar is mild to medium-bodied, medium flavored. It’s smooth and balanced, but it lacks character. That is the case with most Connecticut Shade cigars. It is hard to blend something mild with character. The cigar is mild to medium-bodied and medium flavored. The smoke time is two hours and forty-five minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? Nope, it’s Connecticut Shade

number89

Categories: 89, Casa de Torres, Nicaraguan cigars | Tags: , , , ,

Undercrown Dogma 2019 Toro

Undercrown Dogma 2019 Toro. This box-pressed toro was released in 2019 to commemorate the 5th birthday of the collaboration between Drew Estate and the online cigar community Cigar Dojo. In 2014, the two teamed up for the initial release of the Undercrown Dogma, and that collaboration has been repeated several times since. The cigars are expected to be released in The Netherlands soon, as a limited-edition. Although the coronavirus pandemic may cause some delay in the planning.


The cigars are box-pressed. It’s a 6×56 Toro made at Gran Fabrica Drew Estate. The cigars use a Mexican San Andres wrapper. The binder comes from Connecticut. It’s a Habano binder, harvested using the stalk-cut method. That means that the whole plant is cut at the stalk, instead of leaf by leaf. And then hung upside down to dry. For the fillers, Mata Fina from Brazil is used in combination with Nicaraguan tobacco.


The box-pressed cigar has a rustic, rough-looking wrapper. Dark and oily. The rustic look and the darkness make the cigar look very tasty. The rings are impeccable. Dark blue and gold, all printed in high quality. The cigar feels a little soft though. But box-pressed cigars are made with less tobacco than round cigars, so that’s no surprise. The cigar has a strong aroma of hay.


The cold draw is perfect. The flavor is a mixture of raw tobacco and dusty milk chocolate. Very unusual. Once lit, the cigar has a sour coffee and wood flavor. Slowly pepper and sweetness come into play as well. The sourness fades away and is replaced by soft floral notes. There’s even a hint of milk chocolate. The cigar balances out with coffee, sweetness, and wood. But it is a bit rough in the back of the throat. There is also a flavor best described as old leather. The roughness in the back of the throat fades away. The cigar gets more pepper, wood, and leather. But the sweetness hasn’t disappeared either. The second third starts with leather, pepper, and more milk chocolate. American milk chocolate, which is a world apart from European milk chocolate. The cigar moves to a more woody flavor profile, with some acidity soon after. In the last third, the mouthfeel is dry. There is a distinct nut flavor, with leather, wood, and pepper.


The smoke is superb, as is always the case with Drew Estate. Thick, full, and enough to make the fire brigade drop by. The draw is great. The ash is white and firm. And the burn had to be corrected once or twice. The smoke time of this full-bodied, full-flavored cigar is two hours and fifty minutes

Would I buy this cigar again? Nah, I will stick to the regular Undercrown Maduro

number90

Categories: 90, Gran Fabrica Drew Estate, Nicaraguan cigars, Undercrown | Tags: , , , , ,

Robert Graham 145th Anniversary Robusto

Robert Graham 145th Anniversary Robusto. This cigar celebrates the 145th anniversary of the Scottish liquor shop and tobacconist. They are famous for their own bottling as well. But when whiskey lover and cigar aficionado Stephen Johnstone acquired Robert Graham 1874 in 2014, he started working on private label cigars as well. The Tobacco Lords cigars saw the light. We reviewed the Tobacco Lords Maduro Spiers and the Tobacco Lords Natural Cunninghame before.


The limited-edition Robert Graham 1874 145th Anniversary Robusto, Johnstone looked to Didier Houvenaghel from DH Boutique Cigars. With Houvenaghel, he created a Nicaraguan puro with some vintage tobaccos. All the tobaccos used are from 2012, 2013, and 2014. With a Criollo wrapper, Pelo D’Oro binder and Pilato Cubano and Criollo 98 fillers. The cigars are only available in a 5×50 Robusto. Only 145 numbered boxes of 10 were made. Tabacalera A.J. Fernandez manufactured the cigars.


The cigar looks great. A nice, smooth yet oily Colorado colored wrapper that shows a few thin veins. A very small glossy black foot ring with golden lettering. The regular ring is glossy black to with very detailed golden printing on top. The cigar feels good, with the right amount of bounce when squeezed gently. The shape of the head is immaculate. The aroma is medium strong hay smell.


The cold draw is fine, yet the flavor is musty and dry. Like moldy straw with some spices. That musty flavor remains, although lesser in strength after lighting. It’s accompanied by pepper, coffee, and a lot of leather. After a few puffs, the musty flavor disappears. The cigar now has hints of sweetness, spices, wood, leather, and pepper. It then turns to sweetness, wood, leather, soil, and pepper. The sweetness grows, but with an unusual mixture of spices. The leather, wood, and earthiness are still there as well. At the end of the first third, a nutty flavor shows up too. The cigar is easy to retrohale. The cigar becomes smoother. With balanced, smooth spices, pepper, cedar, grass, and toast.


The draw is very good. The light-colored ash is quite coarse. The smoke is thick, full and white. The burn is pretty straight. The cigar is well balanced. It’s a medium to medium-full bodied cigar, yet full-flavored. The smoke time is an hour and forty-five minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? They are pricy but I would not mind a box

number92

Categories: 92, Nicaraguan cigars, Robert Graham 1874, Tabacalera A.J. Fernandez

Hiram & Solomon Fellow Craft Robusto

Hiram & Solomon Fellow Craft Robusto. Freemasons George Dakrat and Fouad Kashouty are passionate cigar smokers. For years they wondered why there weren’t any cigars with the Freemason symbol. After years of research and getting the right approval, they made 1000 cigars as a fundraiser. That was such a success, that it created the idea of a regular production line. And now, just a few years later, Hiram & Solomon has a series of regular production lines. All of the lines are named after ranks in the Freemason society.


The Fellow Craft is the second tier. Like all other Hiram & Solomon cigars, they are made at Plasencia Cigars in Nicaragua. For the Fellow Craft, the duo blended Habano tobacco from the Nicaraguan regions Ometepe and Jalapa with a Habano Ligero from Esteli. For the binder, they chose Sumatra seed tobacco from Indonesia. And the wrapper is Habano Oscuro from Nicaragua. There are four vitolas available in this line, but we smoked the 5½x50 Robusto.


The cigar looks good. It’s dark, but still quite light for an obscure wrapper. The ring is beautiful. Blue, black and silver with the masonic logo. The foot ring is black and silver with the name of the line. The oily leathery wrapper has a few thin veins and a water spot. The shape and head look good. The construction feels fine with a nice spongy touch. The aroma of the cigar is wood with barnyard.


The cold draw is great. Very spicy raw tobacco is the flavor in the cold draw. Once lit, the cigar releases coffee, leather, wood, and green herbs. Slowly sugar comes in play as well, with a little chili pepper in the aftertaste. Some earthiness shows up too. After a centimeter, leather takes over the dominant role. With a hint of milk chocolate. The aftertaste is still pepper, red pepper flakes. The mouthfeel is dry. The rest of the first third is leathery with wood, soil, herbs, and pepper. There’s even a little hay in the range of flavors too. The second third starts with that smooth leather again. The leather gets accompanied by toast, spice, and pepper. Halfway milk chocolate returns as well. With some nuts. Almost like Nutella. Thick and creamy. Then the wood and leather become stronger again, with more pepper. And there is a vegetal flavor, almost like raw carrots.


The burn is good. The draw is very good. The white smoke is thick and full. The construction of this cigar is great. The ash is white and dense. The cigar is medium-bodied and medium-full flavored. The smoke time is exactly two hours.

Would I buy this cigar again? Yes, I liked it.

number91

Categories: 91, Hiram & Solomon, Nicaraguan cigars, Plasencia | Tags: , , ,

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