Nicaraguan cigars

La Madrina Robusto

La Madrina Robusto. A cigar made for the American cigar company Dapper Cigar Company. A Fresno based cigar company founded in 2013. The La Madrina line, which is available in a robusto, toro, and corona Gorda size, was released in 2017. Strangely enough, the robusto is larger than the toro, yet the toro is thicker. When Ian Reith founded Dapper Cigar Company, he just wanted to make one great cigar. Just for himself and his friends. But the demand went up, and now there are several lines in the Dapper Cigar Company portfolio, including this La Madrina.


The La Madrina Robusto looks like a toro, because of the length of 5⅝. And in fact, it’s longer than the 5¼ Toro. Yet the ring gauge of the Robusto is the regular 50, compared to the 54 of the Toro. Dapper Cigar Company gives very detailed information about the blend on their website. They name the country, type of tobacco, the grower, and in most cases even the farm. So for La Madrina, we know that the filler comes from Esteli and Jalapa in Nicaragua, Pennsylvania in the USA, and from an undisclosed farm in the Dominican Republic. The binder comes from San Andres, Mexico. The wrapper is Habano seed from Ecuador, from a farm called La Luchita.

The cigar looks a bit dry. It is Colorado to Colorado Maduro in color. Beautifully shaped with a nice leather look. The construction feels good with an evenly filled cigar. The ring is gorgeous, glossy black with a red rose in a skeleton hand. Simple, unique and classy. The cigar has a strong aroma of manure.


The cold draw is great. The cigar has a dried grass flavor with white pepper in the aftertaste. Once lit the cigar gives coffee with toffee sweetness. The aftertaste is pepper. Very subtle there are some spices and a little grass too. But mellow, subtle. The spice and pepper are getting a bit stronger and more pronounced, while the coffee is replaced with leather. The toffee sweetness is gone as well. The flavors remain mostly the same. Pepper and spices, with some sweetness, some leather, and some wood. The final third starts with a strong leather flavor. The cigar gets way more interesting now. Leather, wood, pepper, spices with some sweetness and some mild citrus. The wood, leather, pepper, and spices are the strongest in the last few puffs and the mouthfeel is quite dry.


The draw is great. The burn is straight. And the ash is a stack of dimes. The smoke is good. And the smoke has a very pleasant aroma. The cigars lack evolution for the first two thirds. But the last third makes up for it. It’s a medium-bodied, medium flavored cigar. The smoke time is two hours and thirty-five minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? If it was a few euros cheaper

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Categories: Dapper Cigars, Nicaragua American Cigars S.A., Nicaraguan cigars | Leave a comment

Muestra de Tabac Trifecta Brazilian Mata Fina & Sumatra

Muestra de Tabac Trifecta Brazilian Mata Fina & Sumatra. That is a long name for a very unique cigar. So unique that Tabac Trading Company has a patent-pending. The owner of Tabac Trading is Patrick Potter, who grew up in a tobacco store. His grandfather owned the original Tinder Box. Five years ago, in 2015, Potter decided to start a cigar company and traveled over Latin America to learn from experienced blenders. He has seen farms in every country, learned all about fermentation, characteristics of the tobacco and how to blend them together. And with his creativity, he developed the Trifecta line.


There are three different blends in the Trifecta series. For this review, we decided to go for the Brazilian Mata Fina & Sumatra. That’s the one with the green label. This perfecto can be smoked from both sides. The ring is mirrored, so it looks right from whatever side you smoke it. One side has a Sumatra wrapper, the other side has a Mata Fina wrapper. The binder is viso from Cameroon. The fillers all come from Nicaragua, where this cigar is produced.


The cigar looks odd. The shape, the ring that can be read upside down and the two-tone wrapper. The biggest part of the cigar has a darker colored wrapper, rough so that must be the Mata Fina. The other side has a smoother oily wrapper, which is the Sumatra. It would have looked nicer if the ring was exactly in the middle, and both wrappers would have an equal part of the cigar. But the idea is very cool. There is no cap, both sides are open. The cigar feels well constructed, although both ends feel a little soft. There is a strong barnyard aroma to this cigar. The ring is golden with the Tabac Trading Co logo on it and then two green stripes on the side. The stripes have the word Trifecta on it, mirrored. The design could be a little better, less plain, more exciting.


The cold draw is good. The cigar has a bit of dark chocolate, but also a sourness in the flavor profile before being lit. The call was made to light the Sumatra part of the wrapper. The cigar tastes like coffee, sugar, dried leaves and herbs. The sweetness is like powdered sugar. The leaves are slowly growing in strength just as the green herbs. A little musky, nutty flavor shows up too, with a buttery, thick mouthfeel. The nut flavor becomes more pronounced over the spicy herbs from the Cameroon binder. There is a good dose of pepper in the flavor profile too. Right before the change of the wrapper, the cigar gets a nice chocolate flavor, with nuts, spices, leather, and pepper. The mouthfeel is creamy again. As expected the cigar gets sweeter once the Brazilian Mata Fina wrapper starts burning. The cigar remains to be balanced, but the balance isn’t as good as with the Sumatra wrapper. The pepper is getting stronger with the sweetness. The nuttiness returns, but not as strong as before. Pepper is overpowering all other flavors.


The draw is fine. The smoke is thick and plenty in volume, above average. The light-colored ash is firm. The burn needed to be corrected a few times. The cigar is medium-full bodied, medium-full flavored as well. The smoke time is two and a half hours.

Would I buy this cigar again? Yes

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Categories: 89, Muestra de Tabac, Nicaraguan cigars | Tags: , , , ,

Gurkha Treinta Toro

Gurkha Treinta Toro. This cigar was released late 2019 to commemorate the 30th year since Kaizad Hansotia bought the Gurkha brand for $300 while on vacation. He noticed a man rolling cigars under the Gurkha name and selling them. He bought a few, loved them and offered to buy the brand. For just 300 US dollars he got the name and the rest is history. From that, he built a brand that is loved and hated in equal parts. Some swear by Gurkha, others hate the brand with a passion. But everybody has an opinion about Gurkha cigars, there is no in-between.

For the Gurkha Treinta, Hansotia worked with Aganorsa Leaf and the cigars are rolled at Aganorsa’s TABSA factory. That factory produces a lot of great private labels and is highly respected in the cigar community. The cigar utilizes an Ecuadorian Habano Rosado wrapper. The fillers and the binder are from Nicaragua. The binder is an Aganorsa Corojo 99. The fillers come from Esteli and Jalapa and include Criollo 98 and Corojo 99. The Toro is 6×54 in size.

The cigar looks good. The Habano Rosado wrapper doesn’t look oily but has a nice deep color with a reddish glow to it. There are a few thin veins. The cigar feels well packed. The white and gold ring features the Gurkha logo on the ring but is quite modest for a Gurkha cigar. The aroma is deep, manure and dark wood. It’s medium-strong in smell.

The cold draw is on the loose side. The cigar has a dry and slightly spicy tobacco flavor. From the start, the cigar has grass, coffee, leather, wood, and pepper. But all nicely balanced, although there is a little harshness on the back of the throat. But not unpleasant though. There is some nutmeg too. The cigar then turns smooth with lots of spices and a little wood and leather. Slowly some cocoa flavor shows up on the background as well. The flavors are smooth, it’s easy to retrohale this cigar. The second third starts with that beautiful mix of spices, some sweetness, hay, leather, and soil. The mouthfeel is creamy. Slowly there’s a toasted flavor that starts to emerge underneath the spices. The toast is becoming stronger, with more wood and still those nice, balanced mix of spices, pepper, and sweetness. In the final third, the flavors intensify. Still leather, wood, spices, and pepper but stronger. The finale is a little darker in flavor, more soil, wood and leather, fewer spices.

The draw is a little loose, but still within margins. The ash is white, dense and firm. It’s a stack of dimes. The smoke is good in volume and thickness. The burn is razor-sharp. This cigar is well balanced, smooth, and very pleasant. The cigar is medium-bodied, yet full-flavored. The smoke time is two hours and fifty minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? Yes

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Categories: 91, Gurkha, Nicaraguan cigars, TABSA | Tags: , , , , ,

CAO Consiglieri Associate

CAO Consiglieri Associate. Formerly known as the CAO Soprano Associate. When the HBO Series The Sopranos was a hit, CAO managed to get the rights to create a Soprano’s cigar. And released the CAO Sopranos. Just like the TV Show, the cigars were very popular. When the contract with HBO ended, both parties opted not to renew the contract. But since the cigars were in high demand, CAO kept making the cigars. With the exact same blend, the exact same logo, just with a different name. CAO Sopranos became CAO Consiglieri. And now that HBO didn’t have to be paid for the name, the price of the cigars dropped as well.


Just like the original release under the Sopranos name, this cigar uses a Maduro wrapper from Brazil. Mata Fina tobacco to be more precise. The binder comes from Honduras. The fillers are a mix from Nicaragua, Colombia, and the Dominican Republic. The only thing that changed is the foot ring. The original Sopranos release had a big red foot ring with the Sopranos logo, the CAO Consiglieri doesn’t have a foot ring. From the three sizes available, we reviewed the smallest. That’s the 5×52 Associate.

The cigar isn’t the best looking cigar. But that is to be expected from Brazilian wrappers. Brazilian wrappers always have a rustic, rough look to it. It’s dark, it has some veins. It feels like dried leather. The glossy black and red ring stands out because of its shape. The cigar feels well constructed. The head is a bit wonky though. The medium-strong aroma is a mixture of manure and charred wood.


The cold draw is easy. There’s some sweetness, some spice, and pepper in the aftertaste. Straight from the start, the cigar releases warm spices and coffee. With sharp, black pepper in the aftertaste. The flavors remain in the warm spice region. Nutmeg, cinnamon, five-spice, those kinds of flavors. With some sweetness. The pepper remains in the aftertaste. The flavors are nice, but the cigar is tame. Halfway it’s dry wood, spices, sweetness, and toast. The final third starts with the spices, soil, and some dark chocolate. The pepper is still in the aftertaste. This continues to the end. The last few puffs are harsh.


The draw is superb. The light-colored ash drops quickly though. The burn is straight as an arrow. The smoke is thick and full. The cigar is smooth, well balanced yet tame, almost boring. Medium-bodied, medium flavored. But with the association with the badass Sopranos and the mafia, a little more character had to be expected. The smoke time is short with one hour and fifteen minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? Nah

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Categories: 88, CAO, Nicaraguan cigars, STG Nicaragua

300 Hands Maduro Corona Gorda

300 Hands Maduro Corona Gorda. It always surprised us that nobody had used that name before. Everybody in the industry knows that it takes approximately 300 pairs of hands from the seed to the finished cigar in the consumer’s hand. Cigar manufacturers emphasize that often, to show consumers what it takes to create a cigar. And to politicians to show how many families are at stake with their legislative decisions. But nobody used that name for a cigar until Southern Draw did. For two blends, a 300 Mano Habano and a 300 Hands Maduro blend.


In 2018, Southern Draw released this 300 Hands Maduro line. In five sizes, but we managed to get our hands on a Corona Gorda, size 5½x46. Now, truth is, we don’t know where we got his from or who gave it to us. All we know is that the cigars are made in Nicaragua. At Tabacalera A.J. Fernandez. And that the cigar is made with a Nicaraguan Maduro wrapper. The binder comes from Indonesia. The fillers are from the Dominican Republic and Nicaragua.

The cigar looks rustic. A very dark wrapper with tooth. Leather looking, with some lighter colored veins. With a wet finger, we wiped the wrapper to see if it stained. If that was the case, the wrapper would be artificially colored, but no stains at all. The construction feels good. The simple band is nice. White with blue text. 300 Hands, but the nice detail is the serrated top and bottom. The barnyard aroma is strong. This cigar would stand out in a humidor, and we would pick one up to try.


The cold draw is good. And has a surprising flavor of mint and chocolate. Almost like the after eight chocolates. Once lit, there is coffee and pepper. But smooth and mild. There is leather, there is wood too with some citrus fruit. Slowly some complex bitterness of dark chocolate shows up. But it does hurt the back of the throat a little. The cigar then turns to warm spices with pepper and leather. The mouthfeel is thick, buttery. Some fruity acidity comes in play as well, like oranges. After a third, the cigar is all about coffee and that citrus. With pepper in the aftertaste. There is a little harshness in the back of the throat though. Halfway the cigar has a strong nutty flavor, with leather and pepper. In the final third, the pepper grows in strength. It also has wood, coffee, and citrus.


The draw is fantastic. And the ash is white, firm and dense. The burn is good. And the smoke, thick, white and plentiful. The cigar is balanced, smooth. It has character, but not a lot. And there’s a little harshness. The cigar is medium-full in body, medium in flavor. The smoke time is two hours and ten minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? I enjoyed it.

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Categories: 91, Nicaraguan cigars, Southern Draw, Tabacalera A.J. Fernandez

Hiram & Solomon Shriner Robusto

Hiram & Solomon Shriner Robusto. One of the seven blends available within the Hiram & Solomon portfolio but the only one without the Freemason logo. The recipe is the same though. Made in Nicaragua, blended by Fouad Kashouty and George Dakrat with the help of David Blanco. And produced at the renowned Plasencia Cigars factory in Esteli. And as true freemasons, Hiram & Solomon donate parts of the proceeds of the cigars to charity. The brand started as a fundraiser. The idea was to create a one-off cigar for an event, but the cigars became so popular that it resulted in one of the fastest-growing family-owned cigar brands on the market nowadays.

The size of the cigar caused some confusion. The sticker on the cellophane mentions 5×52. That is also mentioned in the vitola list on the website, yet, at the pictures of the cigars, another size is mentioned. 5½x50 instead of 5×52. Cigar nerds as we are, we grabbed our Herics cigar measuring tape to see which information is correct. The cigar measures 5×52. The wrapper is Ecuadorian Sumatra. The binder comes from Indonesia, maybe even the real Sumatra but the specifics have not been disclosed. To make this a five-country blend cigar, fillers from Brazil, Dominican Republic, and two tobaccos from Nicaragua were selected.

The Colorado colored wrapper has a water spot. Quite a large one. But that doesn’t matter and it would be unfair to deduct points. Why? Because we have a few more of these that don’t have ugly spots. Cigars are a natural product, and a water spot can happen. It doesn’t alter the flavor, it is just aesthetically not the best look. The ring, compared to the other Hiram & Solomon cigars, this is lacking the Freemason logo. But the sword and the crest probably have a meaning in the Masonic world. The maroon colored ring is decent yet pale in comparison to the other Hiram & Solomon rings. The wrapper is silky without veins and has some tooth. The cigar feels well constructed. The aroma is strong, barnyard, and hay.

The cold draw is fine, with a dry raw tobacco and raisin flavor. Sweetness with spices, coffee, and earthiness are released from the first puff on. With some red pepper. The flavor has hints of straw and hay, but with some sweetness, spice, and earthiness. There is a little cinnamon in the retrohale, with cedar. After an inch, there is a salty flavor, with honey sweetness, hay, and some slight white pepper. After a third, the flavor turns to sweet, young wood with milk chocolate. The cigar keeps giving that slight woody flavor with sweetness, spice, milk chocolate but now with some leather as well. The sweetness turns to marzipan. Add in a little nuttiness, gingerbread spices, and some white pepper and you have the start of the final third. The last few puffs, nut flavors are strong.

The draw is good and the burn is straight. The ash is quite firm even though it’s frayed. The smoke is white, reasonably thick and the volume is good too. It’s a smooth cigar, no rough edges. But at the same time, it’s lacking some character, it’s pretty middle of the road. Perfect for a cup of coffee late morning. The cigar is smooth, medium-bodied, and medium flavored. The smoke time is two hours and forty minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? I will pick the Hiram & Solomon Fellow Craft over this.

Categories: 90, Hiram & Solomon, Nicaraguan cigars, Tabacos de Oriente Nicaragua | Tags: , , , ,

Herrera Esteli Maduro Toro Especial

Herrera Esteli Maduro Toro Especial. Another blend by master blender Willy Herrera for Drew Estate. This blend was released in 2018, 7 years after his move to the big cigar manufacturer. But he rose to fame as a blender at the small Miami based El Titan de Bronze. That small factory in Little Havana is owned and operated by his in-laws and that’s where Jonathan Drew found Herrera. One of the promises that Drew made was a cigar with the Herrera name, although that did take some time and effort as Frank Herrera, the cigar lawyer, had registered his name and used it for cigars as well.


The Herrera Esteli Maduro is made in Nicaragua, at the Gran Fabrica Drew Estate. For the blend, Herrera took Nicaraguan filler from Drew Estate’s tobacco library. He blended that with a Connecticut Broadleaf binder from the Connecticut River Valley and a Brazilian Mata Fina wrapper. There are five sizes available, but for this review, we decided on the 6×52 Toro Especial.


The cigar has that typical Brazilian Mata Fina wrapper. Dark but kind of rough looking, with a few veins. For a Mata Fina, it’s actually quite smooth, but it’s rougher than the average Maduro. The blue and golden ring with white letters is a copy of the original Herrera Esteli, just in a different color scheme. The cigar feels well rolled. The triple cap is beautiful. And the cigar has a strong aroma. Sweet straw with some charred wood comes to mind.

The cold draw is fine, with a mild yet intense dark chocolate taste. The first flavors are salty wood with a bit of leather. Slowly the cigar develops some leaf flavors as well, and mild chocolate. The expected sweetness from the Brazilian wrapper is lacking though. The mouthfeel is meaty, chewy. After a third, the flavors become more complex. It’s wood and grass, but then with a mix of sugar, pepper, spices, leather, soil, and toast. All those flavors are mild and balanced. Halfway the cigar gets a nice roasted coffee bean flavor with spices, pepper, and leather.


The draw is superb. And the ash is white and dense. The burn is good, not straight as an arrow but no corrections are needed. And the smoke is thick and full, a Drew Estate trademark. The smoke time is two hours and fifteen minutes. This cigar is full-bodied, full-flavored.

Would I buy this cigar again? Yes, I enjoyed it
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Categories: 90, Gran Fabrica Drew Estate, Herrera Esteli, Nicaraguan cigars | Tags: , , , , , ,

Don Duarte Reserva Robusto

Don Duarte Reserva Robusto. A brand that may not ring a bell with many cigar smokers. But it has a history to it. About a decade ago, the brand had some traction in Europe. But due to health-related reasons, Roger Duarte Rodriguez had to put everything on hold. Now the brand is back and available in a few countries. The Nicaraguan puro with the H2000 Oscuro wrapper that we are reviewing is from the personal stash of Don Duarte and has been aged for a decade.


The great grandparents of Don Roger Duarte Rodriguez, Don Rafael Rodriguez, and Juana Lanuza de Rodriguez, were one of the founders of Esteli. Don Rafael Rodriguez was a tobacco grower and one of the first to export tobacco out of Nicaragua. And his great grandmother on the Duarte side, Dona Maria Duarte Boza, owned a small tobacco manufacturing plant in Masaya. They processed tobacco from Ometepe and turned them into small cigars called Chilcagres. So tobacco runs through the blood of the Managua born entrepreneur. He acted as President of Tabacalera Tropical, which is now known as Aganorsa Leaf. That’s where he met the legendary Evelio Oviedo who blended the Don Duarte cigars.


The cigar has a closed foot. That always gets a cigar a few bonus points for aesthetic reasons. The wrapper is dark, leathery, oily and beautiful. The brown ring fades away on the dark wrapper. The secondary ring is gold with black text. The triple cap is beautiful. And even after ten years, the cigar still has a nice, medium-strong aroma of wood and barnyard. The construction feels good.


The cold draw is tight, due to the closed foot. But there is flavor in the cold draw. Gingerbread comes to mind and black pepper. The first flavors after lighting the cigar are wood, leather, spices, and a pleasant sweetness. Some pepper and coffee show up as well but mellowed out after a decade of aging. The aging also makes the cigar easy to retrohale. In the second third, there is more pepper but again mellow. With spices, leather, and even a hint of chocolate. Slowly there are coffee flavors, spices, leather, and even a little fruity acidity. Near the end, the cigar gains a lot of pepper, spice, but there is also some sweetness, wood, and leather.


The draw is great. The ash is white. The white blueish smoke is sufficient but could be a little thicker. The cigar is mellow, smoothed out due to the decade of aging. It’s still medium-bodied, medium flavored though. The cigar is well balanced, it has character. The smoke time is two hours and fifteen minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? Yes, no doubt

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Categories: 92, Don Duarte, Nicaraguan cigars, Plasencia | Tags: , , , ,

El Viejo Continente Mare Nostrum Robusto Extra

El Viejo Continente Mare Nostrum Robusto Extra. At the latest Intertabac trade show, last September, El Viejo Continente released their latest blend. The Mare Nostrum, inspired by and named after the Mediterranean Sea. El Viejo Continente founder and master blender Daniel Guerrero sees the Mediterranean Sea from his balcony in Barcelona every morning. He loves the view so much, it inspired him to create this blend. And the Romans called the Mediterranean Sea “Mare Nostrum” so the name fits perfectly.


El Viejo Continente never disclosed the blend, but Guerrero did say that he used Nicaraguan, Dominican and Brazilian tobacco. The blend is available in a 4¾x50, 4¾x56, and a 5½x56 vitola.


The cigar is almost completely covered in blue rings. First a big El Viejo Continente ring, in blue. Then a secondary ring that looks a lot like the Cuban Regional Edition rings, but with blue instead of red. And it says Mare Nostrum. And then a blue foot ring. But the blue of the foot ring is not the same color. That makes it aesthetically unappealing. The blue of the secondary ring has the same motive as the main ring on closed inspection, which is a cool idea. The wrapper looks very leathery with some tooth. It feels well constructed. It has a strong aroma of sawdust and cocoa powder.


The cold draw is good. With a sweet yet spicy raw tobacco flavor. After lighting, its strong espresso with pepper. Earthy and dark. Wood, sweetness, and leather slowly show their presence too. The soil gets stronger with a little bit of metallic touch to it. Slowly earthy dark chocolate shows up too. Halfway the cigar brings more pepper with more dark chocolate. The soil and leather are still there, but more on the background.


The burn is great, just like the draw. The cigar produces a good amount of smoke, with a good thickness. The rings are glued on with pretty strong glue, making it almost impossible to take them off without destroying them. This is a full-bodied, full-flavored cigar with a smoke time of two hours forty-five minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? Yes

number92

Categories: 92, American Caribbean Tobacco S.A., El Viejo Continente, Nicaraguan cigars

Liga Privada Unico Year of the Rat

Liga Privada Unico Year of the Rat. Although this is a special one and not released because of the Chinese Zodiac Calendar. This cigar was released in 2016. And it is made for the lounge that Drew Estate opened that year at the BB&T Center in Sunrise Florida. The BB&T Center is the home base of the Florida Panthers, an NHL team. And this Liga Privada Year of the Rat is a commemorative cigar for the 1996 Championship. In 1996, the Florida Panthers won the Stanley Cup, the most prestigious prize in ice hockey. And according to the legend, one of the players killed a rat with his stick in the dressing room before the first match of the season. And then scored two goals. The rat became a good luck talisman for the season, and 1996 was ‘the year of the rat’ for the Florida Panthers.


The 5½x46 Grand Corona was given to us a few years ago by Jessi Flores. Back then, Flores was still part of the Drew Estate family, before venturing out on his own. At one of the Intertabac Trade Shows, Flores shared a few Liga Privada Unico cigars with us. This Liga Privada Unico Year of the Rat is made at the famous Gran Fabrica Drew Estate. For the filler, tobaccos from Nicaragua and Honduras are used. The binder comes from Brazil. The wrapper is the famous Connecticut Broadleaf that Drew Estate loves to use. The cigars were sold for $14 per piece and were packed in boxes of 10.


The cellophane was starting to turn yellow by the oil in the wrapper. The cigar looks great, dark and oily. The wrapper looks thick, yet the veins are thin. The cap looks odd, it has a flag tail but the cap is prolonged and looks like a hat on top of the cigar. The regular Liga Privada ring is used, but as always with the Unico series, the text has been altered. This says Year of the Rat. The construction feels flawless. The aroma is strong, oak and roasted coffee beans.


The cold draw is perfect with quite some pepper in the flavor profile. A little salt as well. Once lit there is coffee with a slightly salty flavor. Then there is dark chocolate, the 80% pure type accompanied by some leather and cedar. There is some sweetness, nuttiness, and a mild buttery mouthfeel. After a while, a mild black pepper shows up as well, with some grassy flavors. The flavors then evolve to black coffee, leather, soil with a mild peppery aftertaste. The nut flavor is making a comeback, with the pepper and some sweetness. In the last third, the flavors are pretty much the same. Leather, coffee, wood, dark chocolate, and pepper.


The draw is flawless. The smoke is a classic Drew Estate smoke. Thick, full, white and there is plenty of it. The ash is white and nice. The burn is pretty straight. Because the cigar has aged, the flavors are well rounded while still packing strength. Both in flavor and strength. The smoke time is two hours and forty minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? Yes I would

number91

Categories: 91, Gran Fabrica Drew Estate, Liga Privada, Nicaraguan cigars | Tags: , , , , ,

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