Nicaraguan cigars

The Circus Twister Torpedo

The Circus Twister Torpedo. A barber pole that represents the knowledge and know-how of the cigar blenders. It is related to El Viejo Continente, as Daniel Guerrero is the owner and blender of both brands. Previously I did a review of the Circus Maduro Lancero. But today we smoke the barber pole Twister. Unlike the Lancero, the Twister is part of the line since the original release.

The cigars are made at the brand new El Viejo Continente Cigar factory. Previously El Viejo Continente and Circus came from American Caribbean Cigars. The series is a tribute to all the people that worked with master blender Daniel Guerrero during the creation of this cigar. It took Guerrero and his people four years to make the blend. The first four sizes were named with the team in mind. The Magician represents the ingenuity of the team where the Harlequin is the fact of always wanting to make it. The Twister stands for the knowledge and the know-how of the blenders. And the Canon is the final shot, an explosion of flavors

This cigar is a looker. The two-tone wrapper is cool. The head of the torpedo is immaculate. The bright, colorful ring stands out. This is a cigar you will notice in a full humidor. The construction feels good. The aroma is strong and dark, pure manure.

The cold draw is a bit loose, with a dry sultana flavor. The first puffs are dried leaves with a little bit of a clove flavor. Slightly toasted as well. There is also a mild sweet flavor, almost like agave syrup. The cigar gets a bit of a sweet floral flavor, with dried leaves. Slowly the sweetness gets stronger, almost cotton candy-like although not as overpoweringly sweet as those. The second third welcomes some cedar, leather, and more dark spices to the palate. The cigar is smooth and edgy at the same time. The toast makes a comeback with just the right amount of sweetness and a little cream. It’s almost like having a piece of toast with butter and cane sugar. Later on, there is a dark chocolate bitterness. The final third has an acidity with hay. The finale has a blast of pepper.

The draw is fine. The smoke is plentiful, yet the color is gray. The light gray ash is dense and firm. The burn is beautiful. This is a well-balanced cigar, medium in body, medium-full in flavor. The smoke time is two and a half hours.

Would I smoke this cigar again? Yes

Categories: 91, American Caribbean Tobacco S.A., Nicaraguan cigars, The Circus | Tags: , , , | Leave a comment

Hiram & Solomon Grand Architect Toro

Hiram & Solomon Grand Architect Toro. When Hiram & Solomon introduced the Grand Architect in 2019 the company had something to say. “It is appropriate that a society founded on the principles of architecture, which symbolizes the terms of that science to moral purposes, and whose members profess to be architects of a spiritual temple should view the Divine Being, under whose holy law they are constructing that edifice, as their Master Builder or Great Architect. Sometimes, but less correctly, the title Grand Architect of the Universe is found.”

The cigar, like all regular production Hiram & Solomon cigars, comes from Nicaragua. They are made at Plasencia Cigars and David Blanco from Blanco Cigars is part of the blending team. The tobacco from Paraguay is pretty rare. It is part of the filler, together with tobacco from Esteli and Jalapa. The binder is Habano Seco from Jalapa. The wrapper is Nicaraguan Corojo. There are several sizes available but for this review,I smoke a 6×52 Toro.

The cigar has a bit of a reddish glow on the wrapper. It is smooth and mild oily. The ring is different than other Hiram & Solomon rings, it doesn’t have the Masonic logo. But it is in the same style and recognizable as part of the Hiram & Solomon line. Baby blue with gold, high-quality print work. The cigar feels well constructed. The barnyard or petting zoo aroma is pleasant and strong.

The cold draw is a bit tighter than perfect. It leaves a mixture of raisin and white pepper on the lips. The cigar gives coffee, herbs, sweetness from the start. There is also a bit of leather. There is a strange but pleasant salt flavor as well. After a few puffs, leather, herbs and wood take over. The flavors are smooth, but with a little edge. The balance is there, but a bit more character would have been nice. The second third starts with wood, leather, herbs, white pepper, and a bit of sweetness and hay. The sweetness is very distinct while the pepper grows a bit. Right before the cigar moves in the third the cigar gives wood, leather, soil, pepper, and a bit of cinnamon. There is more character now. Wood and leather getting stronger, with cinnamon and white pepper as support. The finale is full of strength, very nice in flavor with cinnamon, leather, pepper, and wood.

The draw is fine. The ash is salt and pepper colored, it is also a bit frayed. The cigar produces a good amount of medium-thick smoke. The burn had to be corrected once. This cigar is medium to full in body and in flavor. The cigar starts out mellow and easy, but slowly there’s more character. The smoke time is two hours and fifteen minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? Yes, I enjoyed it.

Categories: 91, Hiram & Solomon, Nicaraguan cigars, Tabacos de Oriente Nicaragua | Tags: , , , ,

Perdomo 20th Anniversary Connecticut Robusto

Perdomo 20th Anniversary Connecticut Robusto. Yes, Connecticut Shade and I know I said I would stop reviewing Connecticut Shade wrappers. It just doesn’t fit my profile. But the guys as Cigaragua in Amsterdam really sold this cigar to me, claiming it is a must-try Connecticut Shade. We heard it before, but trusting their judgment I am going to give it a try.

For this blend, Nick Perdomo grew Cuban seed filler and binder on his farms in Nicaragua. The filler and binder are all higher priming leaves And he uses Connecticut Shade from Ecuador as the wrapper. But he ages the wrapper 8 years and then an additional 8 months in bourbon barrels. This to ensure the creamy and rich flavor complements the high priming filler and binder. This Robusto is 5×56.

The cigar looks good. As with any Perdomo band, the quality is outstanding. Detailing is good, embossing is fantastic, beautiful color schemes. The wrapper itself is not so pale for a Connecticut Shade wrapper. It is smooth. The cigar feels evenly filled. The aroma is strong, spice and wood.

The cold draw is a bit loose, with that typical old book flavor that is Connecticut Shade. But with cinnamon this time. At first, there is creamy coffee with white chocolate and sweetness. The old book or library flavor from the cold draw is nowhere to be seen yet, which is a positive. That distinct flavor is always the letdown of Connecticut Shade cigars. This cigar doesn’t have that flavor at the start. The cream is thick, with sweetness and cedar. Slowly some spices show up too, but it’s mainly cream, cedar, and a hint of white chocolate. The aroma of the cigar has a little bit of a toasty smell. The cigar is pleasant to retrohale. Halfway there is a mild peanut flavor with sweetness, cream, mild white pepper, and a little bit of pepper. And there is a little bit of salt. The cigar gets more cedar and caramel, a little leather, spices, and pepper complement these main flavors. Near the end, there are nuts and pepper. And as a farewell also a nice coffee flavor.

The draw is great. The light gray ash is firm. The cigar releases plenty of thick smoke. This is a mild to medium cigar in body. But more than that in flavor, medium for sure. The burn is decent. This is a smooth cigar, with balance. The smoke time is two hours and forty-five minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? I think this is the first traditional Connecticut Shade cigar that I really like

Categories: 91, Nicaraguan cigars, Perdomo, Tabacalera Perdomo | Tags: , , ,

Joya de Nicaragua Cinco Dedacas El Embargo

Joya de Nicaragua Cinco Dedacas El Embargo. That is a mouth full. Not just by name, but also by size, a 6×60. This cigar is exclusively for Europe. And the name suits, as Europe was the continent where Joya de Nicaragua sold its cigars when the Reagan presidency installed an embargo against Nicaragua and the Sandinista regime. The embargo was in place until 1990.

The Joya de Nicaragua Cinco Decadas blend stems from the 50th anniversary of the oldest cigar factory in Nicaragua. It is part of the Obras Maestras selection, the best Joya de Nicaragua has to offer. As for the blend, nobody but the master blenders at Joya de Nicaragua know. The blend is a company secret. The cigars come in boxes of ten and are available exclusively in Europe.

It’s a 6×60 but at first glance, it doesn’t look much bigger than the toro due to the semi box press. The beautiful oily wrapper is dark and leathery. The cream color of the ring with the red and golden print is beautiful as well. The cigar feels well constructed. The aroma is medium strong. Darm wood with green herbs is the best way to describe the aroma.

The cold draw is fine with dry spices. The first flavors are toast, leather, with spices. The flavors slowly intensify. After a while, coffee and a hint of vanilla appear. Slowly towards the end of the first third, the mouthfeel gets thick and meaty. With more wood, spice, and pepper. The cigar picks up more coffee and spice. With some earthiness, wood, and leather. It’s getting stronger. The final third starts with coffee and soil. The cigar is too strong to retrohale. The finale is earthy, woody, with coffee and pepper.

The draw is great. Thanks to the semi box-press the 60 ring gauge isn’t that bad. The ash is light in color and quite firm. The burn is beautiful and the smoke is thick. It is a full-body cigar with lots of flavors. The smoke time is two hours and forty minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? I’d take the Diadema over this size. But it is a great smoke.

Categories: 91, Fabrica de Tabacos Joya de Nicaragua, Joya de Nicaragua, Nicaraguan cigars | Tags: , , , , ,

Black Works Studio Killer Bee Green Hornet

Black Works Studio Killer Bee Green Hornet. In 2016, James and Angela Brown made the Black Works Studio Killer Bee Green Hornet a regular production cigar. Before it was only available as an event-only cigar. Black Works Studio is the experimental sister of Black Label Trading Company, owned by the Browns.

The cigar measures 5×48 and is the bigger brother of the Killer Bee. The filler and binder are Nicaraguan. But the wrapper is the star of the show. Ecuadorian Maduro with little pieces of Ecuadorian Candela. Not in a barber pole style, but a thin swirl at the head and a closed candela foot. The cigars come from Nicaragua, from the factory that the Browns own: Oveja Negra.

This cigar is killer, not just in the name but in looks as well. A beautiful oily Maduro wrapper, and then three thin candela lines in the head. The last half centimeter of the foot is candela as well. It is a closed foot. The black ring has fading green letters and fits perfectly. This is one of the best-looking cigars in ages. The head is beautifully rounded. The cigar has a nice aroma of hay and sawdust.

There is nothing to say about the cold draw. Because of the closed foot, there is virtually no draw at all. But the head of the cigar leaves some pepper and spice on the tip of the tongue. Once lit its grass. No surprise as that is the characteristic of candela. There’s also some coffee with a hint of sweetness. Once the candela is gone, it’s dark chocolate. Dark chocolate with soil and pepper. At the end of the first third, there’s also some citrus and leather with the coffee, soil, and white pepper. The second third has some wood, leather, soil, dark roast coffee, spice, and sweetness. The flavors are balanced, with the right amount of aggression. It’s not smooth, but also not rough. The sweetness is of dried fruits. The final third has more toast and leather. The mouthfeel becomes dry. Dark chocolate and some spice remain as well. The pepper grows a bit in strength.

The cigar gives a lot of smoke, straight from the start. The draw is great. The ash is light gray and reasonably firm. The burn is straight. It is a medium to full cigar in body. The flavor is medium in strength. The smoke time is one hour and forty-five minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? I enjoyed it thoroughly so yes.

Categories: 93, Black Label Trading Company, Nicaraguan cigars, Oveja Negra | Tags: , , , , , ,

Aging Room Quattro Nicaragua Maestro

Aging Room Quattro Nicaragua Maestro. The Cigar Aficionado Cigar of the Year 2019. Many of my followers praise this cigar on Instagram, Facebook, and other social media accounts. So it’s time for me to review this cigar as well. To see if it lives up to the hype. A 96 score isn’t very common, so our expectations are high.

A.J. Fernandez is responsible for the production. But Aging Room is a creating of Rafael Nodal, who’s now the head of product capability of Altadis U.S.A. But before that, he was the owner of Boutique Blends and that was or is the umbrella for Aging Room. This Aging Room blend is a Nicaraguan puro.

The cigar looks great. A dark and oily wrapper. Smooth yet impressive. With a beautiful black, gold, and white ring. The secondary ring pops with its bright orange and gold. This cigar screams “pick me, you won’t regret it”. The box-press is flawless and the cigar feels well constructed. The cigar has a thick and strong barnyard aroma.

The cold draw is flawless. The flavor is spice and pepper. The first puffs are earthy, with black dark roast coffee and pepper. Lots of pepper. Soon some wood and leather join the earthy and spice flavors of the cigar. There’s also a dry nutty flavor in the profile. After a third, there is black pepper, sweetness, earthiness. Some toast and roasted coffee beans show up as well. Even though it’s a strong cigar, the flavors are round. There is not mean harshness. The pepper is growing in strength. All flavors are tied together with some citrus acidity. Near the end the pepper really becomes powerful.

The draw is flawless. The ash is salt and pepper colored. But it breaks easy. The burn is straight. The smoke is good, thick enough and full enough. This cigar is a full-body cigar, full flavor yet with plenty of balance. The smoke time is two hours and ten minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? Yes, I want a box

Categories: 92, Aging Room, Nicaraguan cigars, Tabacalera A.J. Fernandez | Tags: , , , , , , , ,

Undercrown Shady XX by Drew Estate

Undercrown Shady XX by Drew Estate. When you think “cigars and hip-hop” there is one brand that jumps out. It is Drew Estate. Hip-hop originated in New York, just as Drew Estate. And everybody at Drew Estate loves hip-hop, it is the music you hear at their booth during every trade show. So when Shady Records was looking for a cigar company to collaborate with, Drew Estate was the obvious choice. And so happens. In 2014, 10 tobacconists in the Detroit area had the opportunity to sell Undercrown Shady cigars. These were a limited edition. It was a success, so the next editions were distributed through Drew Diplomat retailers all over the USA.

Now why Shady Records wanted a cigar is simple. The label is the creation of Eminem and Paul Rosenberg, his manager. Rosenberg is an avid cigar smoker. Sometimes it is as simple as that. The Undercrown Shady XX is the 20th anniversary of Shady Records. It is a bolder version of the Undercrown Maduro. The wrapper is Mexican San Andres Maduro with an American Connecticut Habano binder.

The cigar looks mean. A leathery dark wrapper on a short, stomp box-pressed bellicose. The blue and gold band with the lion looks great and the secondary ring with the Shady Records logo matches it. The construction feels great. The cap is smooth and pretty. The cigar has a strong dark aroma. Dark wood, soil, and barnyard aromas.

The cold draw is good. The flavors in the cold draw are raw tobacco and dark chocolate. Wood, leather, and spices. Full, Nicaraguan, bold like the lyrics of Eminem. There is some toast and roasted coffee as well. A few puffs later, a peanut flavor shows up. With plenty of pepper. The cigar is impossible to retrohale due to the strength. The cigar turns earthy, with cedar. Spicy and strong. The final third has pepper, cedar, earthiness, nuts, and roasted coffee beans.

Due to sad family circumstances, I’m not smoking this cigar in my well-ventilated office but in a shed in my parent’s garden. With a heater and the door closed. Within minutes this cigar leaves you gasping for air due to the thick and heavy smoke. The burn is even and the firm ash is white. The draw is good as well. This is a strong cigar in body and flavor. The smoke time is two and a half hours.

Would I buy this cigar again? I actually prefer the regular Undercrown Maduro

Categories: Nicaraguan cigars | Tags: , , , ,

Liga Privada Bauhaus

Liga Privada Bauhaus. Over the past few years, Drew Estate has done some exclusive releases for the European market. For example an Undercrown Shade vitola for the German John Aylesbury Group. And the original release of the Undercrown Maduro Flying Pig was a project for the Dutch group Compaenen. Both John Aylesbury and Compaenen are independent tobacconists combining buying power. But never has there been a European exclusive Liga Privada. Until now. Last December Drew Estate made an announcement. There would be a European exclusive Liga Privada Bauhaus. And it’s available now.

The Liga Privada Bauhaus gets its name from the architectural movement Bauhaus. The Short Robusto pays extra attention to leaf placement within the cigar. The blend takes the European cigar enthusiasts through a newly curated experience. The cigar measures 4½x50 and comes in elegant blue boxes of 12 cigars. The cigars use filler from Nicaragua and Honduras. The binder is bold Brazilian tobacco. The wrapper is a rich earthy Connecticut Broadleaf capa. The cigars come from the rolling tables of the Gran Fabrica Drew Estate in Esteli, Nicaragua.

As all Liga Privada cigars, this is a looker. A stunning black and oily wrapper with character due to the fine veins that run over the leaf. The classic white, gray, and gold band form a beautiful contrast. The Bauhaus name is printed big on the ring. The triple cap is beautiful. The relatively small size fits the look. The construction feels good. The aroma is surprisingly fresh. Fresh wood, floral, and herbal, almost lavender-like.

The cold draw is a little on the easy side. The flavors in the cold draw are floral with a nice spicy kick. From the get-go, this cigar is peppery, sweet, earthy with some leather. It’s in your face immediately, aggressive but in a good way. Almost instantly toast and wood join the previously mentioned flavors. There’s also some coffee. Complex, many strong flavors are battling in the mouth. After the first centimeter, the cigar mellows out a bit without losing its strength. The flavors calm down with spice, nuts, soil, wood, and leather now more in balance. Slowly dark roast coffee takes the spot for the most dominant flavor. Halfway there is more wood with the dark roast coffee. Yet there is also a dry grassy flavor with spice and sweetness. Some puffs later a slightly acidic flavor shows up as well.

The draw is fine. And the air purifier is always working overtime when smoking a cigar from Drew Estate. The burn is nice and straight. The ash is fine when it comes to firmness, yet the color is yellowish-brown. This cigar is full of body and strength. The smoke time is two hours.

Would I buy this cigar again? I can buy bigger Liga Privada cigars for less, so I don’t think so

Categories: 92, Gran Fabrica Drew Estate, Liga Privada, Nicaraguan cigars | Tags: , , , ,

Pappy van Winkle Tradition Coronita

Pappy van Winkle Tradition Coronita. A cigar by Drew Estate in collaboration with the famous bourbon brand Pappy van Winkle. Where the fermented cigars are exclusive to the Pappy van Winkle shop. But then the two released the Pappy van Winkle Tradition. It’s available to all Drew Diplomat retailers. There are five sizes available, plus one event only vitola. And a seventh vitola just for Jonathan Drew to hand out.

The 4×46 Coronita is one of the five regular production sizes. The cigar is made with an Ecuadorian Habano Oscuro wrapper. The binder comes from Indonesia. The Dominican Republic and Nicaragua take care of the filler tobaccos. Willy Herrera is responsible for the blend. The cigars come from La Gran Fabrica Drew Estate in Esteli, Nicaragua.

Most of the cigar is hidden with a large ring. A ring with an old picture of a cigar-smoking gentleman. Could it be Pappy himself? The same picture is on the Family Reserve bottles of bourbon. The part of the wrapper that is visible is beautiful. Dark, oily, and smooth. The construction feels good. The aroma is quite strong. Dark, musky, and wood.

The cold draw is great. The flavor is leathery. The first puffs after lighting are strong, leathery with some sweetness, hay, earth, and wood. The mouthfeel is thick. The retrohale is very nice. The cigar has a sweetness that pairs well with bourbon I guess. The sweetness is gaining strength with some spice and a hint of dark chocolate. There is still that slight alcohol flavor as well. The final third has more cedar and a little spice. There is still some leather.

The draw is amazing. The smoke is classic Drew Estate, full and a lot of it. The burn is straight and the ash is reasonably firm. The cigar is medium in body and flavor. There is not a lot of evolution, but then again, it is a short cigar so there isn’t much room for that. It is well balanced and smooth. The smoke time is one hour and ten minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? I really liked this cigar, but 15 dollars for a petit corona is a bit much.

Categories: 91, Gran Fabrica Drew Estate, Nicaraguan cigars | Tags: , , ,

Muestra de Saka Unstolen Valor

Muestra de Saka Unstolen Valor. We feel that Steve Saka doesn’t need any introduction. The first cigar blogger back in the day, then a consultant for JR Cigars. Former CEO of Drew Estate, where he changed the course of the company from infused cigars to a hugely successful portfolio of traditional cigars as well. And since 2015 owner of Dunbarton Tobacco and Trust, his own company. With fantastic blends, several of whom ended up in the Ministry of Cigars top 25 of 2019 and 2020.

The Muestra de Saka line is a selection of unique blends and vitolas. The 2020 Muestra de Saka release is different than other years though. Why? Well, it is the blender. Where all Dunbarton Tobacco & Trust blends are from the capable hands of master blender Saka himself, this cigar is the vision and skill of Raul Disla. Disla is the factory manager of NACSA, one of the two factories that make cigars for DTT. This blend of Nicaraguan cigars is so good that Saka deems it worthy to carry the Saka name. And to give credit where credit is due, the name is unstolen valor. Unstolen, because Disla gets all the credit, Steve Saka isn’t shy telling people that this is a Disla blend.

The wrapper on this cigar is stunning. Dark, oily, no thick veins, just a beautifully almost lacquered wrapper leaf with thin veins. Like the skin of an African goddess. The lack of a ring makes the appearance of the wrapper even more noticeable. The only ring on the cigar is a bright yellow cloth ring on the foot with Muestra de Saka and Unstolen Valor printed. The cap is perfect, and the cigar feels evenly filled. The aroma is strong, barnyard, hay, and moist soil.

The cold draw is a bit loose but flavorful. A spice bomb. Once lit it’s a spice bomb too, pepper, herbs, but with coffee, and soil. Full, in your face as only Nicaraguan cigars, can be. After a few puffs, the initial blow is over. The flavors are still there, but with more nuance now. It’s then when some wood and sweetness make an appearance. The cigar then becomes woodier, with leather, herbs, and cocoa. The leather slowly takes control, with pepper as its lieutenant. And where the cigar was in your face at the beginning, it’s subtle and nuanced now. Yet without losing any of its strength. The pepper mellows out, the cigar is now all about leather and wood, with a tiny supporting role for earthiness and cocoa. The rest of the first third is a beautiful mixture of leather, cocoa, wood, earthiness, with just enough spice and pepper to keep it very interesting. The leather gains strength, thick, dark leather. There is a faint vanilla flavor. The final third has a lingering metallic flavor, and wood takes over from leather. There are some spices, but the most predominant spice is pepper.
The cigar ends as it started, strong, bold, in your face with coffee, earthiness, and a lot of pepper.

The draw is fantastic. The ash is like a stack of dimes. And a good, stable stack as well. The burn is straight and slow. The smoke is decent, quite thick and full but not Drew Estate style smoke. This is a full-body cigar, full of flavor too. The smoke time is three hours and twenty minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? Yes

Categories: 93, Muestra de Saka, Nicaragua American Cigars S.A., Nicaraguan cigars | Tags: , , , , , ,

Create a free website or blog at WordPress.com.