Quesada Cigars

Quesada Cigars

Heisenberg Robusto

Imagine being a theoretical physicist, doing great discoveries like the uncertainty principle and winning a nobel price when you’re just 31 and all you will be remembered by is a fictional meth dealer with terminal cancer and your field of science is mocked by one of the most popular comedy series ever where a total but brilliant nut job named Sheldon Cooper is playing a theoretical physicist. I bet Werner Heisenberg, born on this day in 1901, would be turning in his grave if he knew.


But some people still remember his uncertainty principle, people like the Quesada family, and they created a cigar around this theory. The only thing they revealed was the size, nothing more nothing less, no blend whatsoever, nothing, so that people had to smoke it completely blank and without prejudice. A quote from the original press release said “The Heisenberg project is named after the scientific formula of the same name that proves the fundamental limits of precision: in other words, no matter how much we know about something we will never know everything; the more we focus on one aspect, the less we know about another. The Heisenberg project has two intentions: to dispel the stereotypes that limit our ability to enjoy a cigar and remind aficionados that sometimes its best to sit back, relax, and just enjoy a smoke without over analyzing it. To put it simply, “Embrace Uncertainty!” Before writing this review I googled Werner Heisenberg and his theory but even the simplest of explanations gave me a headache, so I quit reading and decided to focus on the cigar en embrace the uncertainty.


The cigar is a tad thin for a robusto with a 48 ring, but it does have the classic 5 inch length. I do like thinner cigars so i’m not complaining though. The wrapper is dark, smooth and oily and the black ring with silver edges and the formula for the uncertainty principle in silver compliments the wrapper. On the back the name Heisenberg is written in small letters. I’m glas Quesada didn’t pick blue for the colors. The construction feels good, the cap is placed nicely too. I smell a quite dark, yet not to strong, wood aroma.


I punched the cigar to find a great cold draw with a slightly salt and raisin flavor. The first puff after lighting is coffee with a hint of pepper. After half an inch i taste some nuts, a faint chocolate, some sweetness but all muted and slightly harsh. After an inch I taste salty lemon with some wood. Halfway the lemon grows strong with wood and pepper. After two thirds it’s just spicy oak.


The draw is great and the smoke is medium full in volume and thickness. The ash is light gray and dense, firm too. The burn is pretty straight. I would call this cigar medium to medium full bodied and medium full flavored. The smoke time if an hour and ten minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? This cigar didn’t hit the spot for me.

Score: 88

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Categories: 88, Dominican cigars, Heisenberg, Quesada Cigars | Tags: , , , | Leave a comment

Quesada Reserva Privada Oscuro Toro

Last month I wrote a review on the Quesada Reserva Privada Toro, made with a vintage Dominican Criollo binder. A year after the original release in 2015 the Quesada family released another blend using that same vintage leaf and the same Reserva Privada name, the Quesada Reserva Privada Oscuro with a Connecticut broadleaf wrapper.


Now I am a fan of Connecticut broadleaf, one of my favorite cigars is the La Casita Criolla from Pete Johnson, a cigar completely made with Connecticut broadleaf and I like the La Duena by My Father a lot too so I have high expectations from this cigar. I mean, vintage binder, one of my favorite wrappers and all from a great company. I got this cigar at the last intertabac trade show in a sampler from Raquel Quesada.


The ring is the same as the regular Reserva Privada, black, stylish and gorgeous. The wrapper is very oily, dark and smooth. Halfwheel wrote that the cigar won’t win any beauty contests but this wrapper would certainly catch my eye in a humidor and it screams “i’m delicious, smoke me”. The cigar has a nicely, almost perfect, rounded head, a beautiful triple cap and it feels evenly packed. I live in an area with quite a few cocoa processing plants and when I sniff the cigar that’s what I smell, raw cocoa.


I used my butterfly cutter to decap the cigar. The cold draw is fine, woody and earthy with a mild pepper. After lighting I taste coffee. Soon after I taste wood, a mild pepper, a little lemon and all in a buttery, creamy way. The pepper grows and becomes the dominant flavor while the creaminess disappears. After a third I taste pepper with salt and some wood. Halfway I taste charred dark wood with pepper. The final third is charred wood, pepper and floral flavors. The floral flavor tones down, the pepper gets stronger near the end.


The draw is great while the smoke is very pretty and white, with a great thickness. The light colored ash is firm. The burn is straight. The cigar is medium full bodied and flavored. The smoke time is an hour and forty minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? Yes

Score: 91
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Categories: 91, Dominican cigars, Quesada, Quesada Cigars | Tags: , , , , ,

Quesada Reserva Privada Toro

The Quesada family has honored the previous generations before, in the Tribute series, but this cigar is a tribute too, first and foremost to the father of Manuel Quesada who planted and picked the tobacco for this cigar back in 1997, a year before he passed away, but also a tribute to the new generation in the shape of modern boxes and a hologram logo. And the new generation, in the shape of Raquel Quesada gave me this cigar at the Intertabac trade show.


So the filler is a Dominican San Vincente leaf with Pennsylvania broadleaf ligero, the binder is that vintage, 18 year old, Dominican Criollo with an Ecuadorian Connecticut wrapper in a 5 5/8×54 size. All the cigars are aged an additional year after rolling before they are shipped to the shops. And I wonder, what happens when the vintage binder is gone? Is there a new stash of a 1998 harvest to continue the blend or will the cigar just disappear?


The mocha colored wrapper looks beautiful yet brittle, with a few thin veins. The ring is amazing, simple, stylish, modern with a black back drop, the Quesada Q logo in golden hologram style and glossy silver ‘Quesada’ and ‘reserva’ prints on the sides. Very tasteful, very well printed. The cigar feels well constructed, evenly packed and the triple cap is flawless. The medium strong aroma is typical manure, Cubanesque manure.


I cut the cigar with my butterfly cutter. The cold draw is perfect and I taste a mild sweet floral yet herbal flavor. After lighting I taste a sweet yet mild musty and floral coffee. After an inch I taste sweetness, Connecticut mustiness and cedar. The sweetness fades, a white pepper shows up with a mild floral sweetness. The cigar gets stronger.


The draw is great. The white ash is dense and firm. The smoke is medium in thickness and volume. The burn is beautiful. This cigar is medium bodied and medium flavored. The smoke time is an hour and forty five minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? That darn Connecticut Shade, still not my wrapper.

Score: 89
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Categories: 89, Dominican cigars, Quesada, Quesada Cigars | Tags: , , , , ,

Quesada 70th Anniversary Toro

As you may have figured just from the name, this cigar was created to celebrate the 70th birthday of Manuel Quesada, the man behind Matasa & Quesada cigars, the Dominican Fonseca, Casa Magna, Heisenberg and all other Quesada lines. And for his birthday he took Dominican and Nicaraguan filler, a Sumatra binder and a Dominican wrapper to make an old school cigar with balance and flavor but also with a modern twist.


The cigar is only available in two vitolas, the favorite vitolas of Manuel Quesada and those are the 6×50 Toro and a 6×52 Belicoso. Raquel Quesada gave me a toro during the most recent Intertabac trade show and a few other Quesada cigars, including the Quesada 40th that I reviewed in January. Today I will review the Manuel Quesada 70th Toro.


The smooth and oak colored wrapper is fat and oily, it looks great and tasty with a deep color and nice thin veins. The ring is black and golden, old school with lettering that I would call ‘Wild West’ as you see that kind of lettering in Western movies. It simply says Quesada with small Manuel in a golden banner above the name and 70 below the name. The cigar feels well packed, evenly, and the cigar is beautifully capped. The strong barnyard aroma is nice.


I decapped the cigar with a double guillotine. The draw is open. I taste pepper and sultanas. After lighting the cigar with a soft flame and I taste coffee, sweetness, spices and wood. After half an inch I taste a nice citrus twang with wood, oak to be more precise and some pepper. After an inch it’s still a citrus twang but now with wood, leather and some nuts. Halfway I taste that citrus but now with a chocolate paste, like the bread spread. Then the flavor changes to citrus, pepper and wood. I also taste a hint of vanilla. Near the end I taste wood, herbs, a little mint and some pepper still with the acidic twang.


The draw is good, a little open but still good. The smoke is medium plus in thickness, a beautiful white color and quite a lot. The light gray ash is a bit frayed yet firm. The burn is pretty straight. This is a medium plus bodied and medium full flavored cigar. The smoke time is an hour and forty five minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? I liked the 40th anniversary better.

Score: 89
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Categories: 89, Dominican cigars, Quesada, Quesada Cigars | Tags: , , , ,

Fonseca 30th Anniversary Toro

You can consider this a vintage cigar since it was a limited edition release to celebrate Matasa’s 30th year in business. Now if Matasa doesn’t ring a bell, maybe Quesada does. And Matasa is the name of their factory on the Dominican Republic, Fonseca is on of the brands they make. And they celebrated their 30st birthday back in 2003, thats 15 years ago.

 


The cigar sports a Dominican wrapper. Now that doesn’t turn heads anymore but when it was released it was a novelty. Fuente just released the Opus X, the first cigar with a Dominican wrapper, and together with this Fonseca Matasa 30th anniversary La Aurora and La Flor Dominicana released cigars with Dominican wrappers and that was it. The cigar was released in two vitolas, a 6 1/2×52 Toro and a 5 3/4×54 Perfecto and in total 30.000 cigars were made.

 


The wrapper is dark and oily, leathery but beautiful. The construction feels good although the cap could have been placed a bit nicer. The ring is pretty, glossy black, popping gold, bright red and clear fonts. I like it. And then the aroma, strong and complex, like a Indonesian rendan spice mix.

 


I punched the cigar. The cold draw is fine, I taste some sweet raising followed by some pepper on my lips. A nice strong coffee is the first thing I taste after lighting. After half an inch I taste herbs, spices and a mild dark chocolate. After an inch it’s herbs and a mild peppery flavor. Every few puffs I taste some chocolate too. The flavors then change to meaty with a mild pepper. At the beginning of the final third the pepper gains a little strength. Slowly the pepper is getting stronger towards the end.

 


The draw is good. The white smoke is medium thick and full. The gray ash is dense and firm. The cigar is medium in body and flavor. The smoke time is two hours.

Would I buy this cigar again? Don’t think that would be possible

Score: 90
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Categories: 90, Dominican cigars, Fonseca, Quesada Cigars | Tags: , , , , ,

Fonseca Robusto

This cigar is a classic, made at the Matasa factory owned and operated by the Quesada family that has been in tobacco for decades. I don’t know exactly how they got the rights to the fonseca name, if they bought it or if they owned it in Cuba too and just continued to use the name after the exodus, might be a good question if I ever run into them at Intertabac.


I got this cigars years ago and let it age in my humidor, not for the sake of aging but because it has a Connecticut Shade wrapper, a wrapper I used to hate but started to appreciate during the last year so it’s time to give this Fonseca a chance to impress me. The filler is tobacco from the Cibao region of the Dominican Republic.


the wrapper is light reddish brown color, its a nice color. The wrapper has one vein at the back. The ring is simple, golden with red and white, thin paper, good printing quality. The cigar feels evenly packed with a nice triple cap. The aroma of the cigar reminds me of a mild vinegar and lovage.


I cut the cigar cold draw is great. I taste floral notes with a little pepper. The first flavor is a nice and smooth coffee. Soon I taste some nutmeg too. After an inch the cigar turns a little harsh. The harshness disappears at the one third mark. Halfway I taste fresh wood and refined sugar, the cigar is quite sweet although there’s still a rough edge on the flavor. The final third is sweet, floral with spices. I taste cloves and cumin with a minty aftertaste. The cigar is smooth all of a sudden. Near the end I taste coffee again with some vanilla.


The draw is great but the smoke is thin and gray. The ash is white and dense. The burn is uneven and had to be corrected a few times. This cigar is mild to medium bodied and medium flavored. The smoke time is an hour and twenty minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? Nah, only the last third hit the spot.

Score: 86
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Categories: 86, Dominican cigars, Fonseca, Quesada Cigars | Tags: , , , ,

Quesada 40th Anniversary Toro

This cigar, a 6×49 toro, was created to celebrate the 40th year of Manuel Quesada in the cigar business. Now some of you might think “why did I only hear the name Quesada the last few years?” and the answer to that is that before you probably smoked cigars from their Matasa factory before but none of those cigars carried the Quesada name, I think they were most famous for the Dominican Fonseca brand.


I met Patricia and Raquel Quesada at the intertabac trade show, and in the following week after in Amsterdam where we partied with Rocky Patel and a few others and at the trade show Raquel gave me a sampler with four Quesada cigars to review. The Quesada 40th Anniversary is the first in the series. The cigar has Nicaraguan and Dominican ligero filler, a Habano ligero binder and a beautiful Mexican San Andres wrapper.


This cigar is a looker, a dark, almost black, oily wrapper with beautiful veins and a soft leather touch. The ring fits the cigar, the black and gold ring with the gold and silver tobacco leaf in a Q shape that is the Quesada logo and a shiny black ring with a golden 40. The construction feels good, the shape of the cigar is good, the triple cap is good and there are bonus points for the closed foot, something I like in a cigar. The cigar has a strong manure and barnyard aroma.


I cut the cigar, I used my doubly guillotine cutter. The cold draw has a decent resistance and the flavor is quite peppery on my lips. After lighting I taste coffee and chocolate. Soon the flavors change to earthy flavors and herbs. There is still a little sweetness too. After an inch I taste pepper and wood with a minty aftertaste. Slowly the cigar is getting more peppery, with a dry wood and a little raw carrot. The aftertaste is a fresh, minty chocolate. Halfway I taste a lot of pepper with a little wood. This cigar has Nicaraguan tobacco and it shows in the pepper. The final third is wood, a lot of pepper and a little mint.


The draw is perfect. The burn needed a little correction. The frayed ash is gray and black. The ash is firm though. The burn is razor sharp. The smoke is medium in thickness and volume. I would call this cigar medium plus bodied and full flavored. The smoke time is two full and enjoyable hours.

Would I buy this cigar again? I hope this cigar is released in the Netherlands soon.

Score: 91
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Categories: 91, Dominican cigars, Quesada, Quesada Cigars | Tags: , , , ,

DM 24KT Golden torpedo

When I was looking for a new house I only had one thing that was non negotiable, the house had to have room for a man cave with walk-in humidor, so when I bought my house that was the room that was finished first. My boss knows I’m a cigar geek, that’s the reason he hired me, and gave me a cool housewarming gift. For the last 18 months I’ve been waiting for the right time to smoke it and last Monday was that night. It was my birthday, it was raining outside, my girlfriend is a 13 hour flight away so I could use a ‘pick me up’ moments. That’s Anthony Bourdain’s no reservations Singapore on YouTube, as I’m going there soon, and this DM 24KT golden torpedo 2011, a gold plated torpedo made by Quesada for humidor maker turned cigar brand owner Daniel Marshall.


The cigar comes in a coffin which mentions the website thegoldencigar.com, a website that shows up black on my iPhone and iPad. When you pay so much attention to the cigar, why use such a simple and ugly band? And why mention a website that doesn’t work on mobile devices?  The cool thing is that the gold plating is so thin you can see the veins. Construction feels good but the gold makes it hard to smell anything. Wetting the cap for the cut is a bit of a weird sensation, a weird metallic taste. The cut cap looks cool tough and the predraw is fine yet flavorless, only if I focus real hard I taste a metallic taste and some pepper, but it’s all faint.


Once lit I taste toasty peppery flavors but soon there is some sweetness too. And of course a metallic flavor, but that’s no surprise. After a centimeter I taste a weird wooden flavor, still with that metals undertone. After a third it’s spicy again, like red pepper with the metallic flavor and the wood.
The wood gets stronger, and I get a toast flavor again, of course with the metal. Halfway the toast disappears again with the pepper returning. Later on the cigar gets ashy.


I get a decent amount of smoke from this cigar, pretty thick. The ash is golden, but a lighter shade than the pre burn. It looks weird, the dark ash in the inner core and the golden outside. The burn is a bit crooked, but how do you correct it? The ash is firm because of the melted gold. This cigar is medium bodied and medium flavored. Because of the gold the cigar burns very slow, it lasted me 2 hours.

 


Would I buy this cigar again? No, it’s a $250 gimmick, but now I want to try the Royal Danish gimmick as well.

Appearance: 9
Construction: 8
Draw: 8
Burn: 6
Smoke & ash: 7
Aroma first part: 6
Aroma second part: 6.5
Aroma third part: 5.5

Categories: Daniel Marshall, Dominican cigars, Quesada Cigars | Tags: , , , ,

Quesada tributo Alvarito

The smallest of the Quesada Tributo series is the Alvarito, a 4½x40 petit corona which costed 3 euro in The Netherlands when they were still available. They are off the market now and replaced by the Quesada Espana series, here in the Netherlands.

The band is pretty, simple but stylish just like the foot band. The wrapper is dark and shiny, it looks laquered, that’s how shiny it is. The cigar has a horse stable smell and a good construction. The predraw is great and I taste dry chocolate.

I taste coffee with a hint of nutmeg. The spices slowly get stronger while the coffee disappears. After half an inch I mainly taste spices with spicy herbs and a sugar like sweetness.

After a third the spice leaves and I taste more wood with the herbs and spices. The sweetness has disappeared too. After two thirds the cigar gets quite spicy again.

This cigar has a smoke time of an hour and twenty minutes. The draw is a bit tight. I got plenty of medium thick smoke and a firm pepper and salt colored ash. The wrapper of this full flavoured and medium bodied cigar cracked halfway.

Would I buy this cigar again? Nah

Appearance: 8 / 10
Construction: 8 / 10
Draw: 7 / 10
Burn: 8 / 10
Smoke & ash: 8 / 10
Aroma first part: 7 / 10
Aroma second part: 7 / 10
Aroma third part: 6 / 10

Categories: Dominican cigars, Quesada, Quesada Cigars | Tags: ,

Quesada tributo Julio

The Quesada Tributo series was temporarily available in The Netherlands and I took the advantage to buy all four vitolas to try them. They sold quite fast but the general feedback wasn’t positive enough for the distributer to keep them in his portfolio and replaced them by the Quesada Espana series. I reviewed the three other tributo’s, the 5×50 Julio, with a 4 euro price tag, is the last one.
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The wrapper is beautiful, shiny and oily with a beautiful vein. The bands are still pretty and the construction is fine. The cigar has a smell of a barnyard and straw. The wrapper is very thick. The predraw is a bit tight and I taste smooth raisins.
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I taste coffee and earth, mild sweet. Soon I taste mild sweet leather with some citrus and after half an inch I tste some nuts. After a third I mainly taste citrus with some earth and leather as support flavour, some pepper in the aftertaste. The cigar slowlu gets more spicy. I like it.
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Halfway I also taste some chocolate on the background with citrus and leather. There is also some pepper and nut in. After two thirds the citrus has gone. I do taste a lot of nuts with some leather and earth with a small pepper in the aftertaste.
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This cigar lasted me for two hours. The smoke is ok and the dark ash is frayed, coarse but firm. I had to correct the burn a few times. The draw is a bit tight. The cigar is full flavoured and medium bodied.
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Would I buy this cigar again? Yes, I liked this tributo

Appearance: 8 / 10
Construction: 7 / 10
Draw: 6 / 10
Burn: 7 / 10
Smoke & ash: 8 / 10
Aroma first part: 7 / 10
Aroma second part: 8 / 10
Aroma third part: 8 / 10

Categories: Dominican cigars, Quesada, Quesada Cigars | Tags: ,

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