Cigars by rating

Rocky Patel Number 6 Robusto

Rocky Patel Number 6 Robusto. One of the latest releases of Rocky Patel, released at the IPCPR trade show in July 2019. The number 6 is named after the test blend. Several test blends were made, and the 6th blend was picked. So that became the Rocky Patel Number 6. The cigar is available in several sizes, and for this review, we selected the 5½x50 Robusto.


Unlike most of the recent releases by Rocky Patel, this cigar is made in Honduras. For the last few years, most new cigars came from Patel’s factory in Nicaragua, Tavicusa. But this Number 6 is made at El Paraiso in Danli, Honduras. The blend consists of filler tobaccos from Nicaragua and Honduras. The binder is Honduran. And as a wrapper, Patel and his team picked a Honduran Corojo

The black and golden ring is huge. It covers half the cigar, and then there is another ring at the foot. But the matte black details, shiny gold and white letters work well together. The wrapper, as far as we can see, has a few thin veins. The color is great, and there is a light oily shine. The cigar feels well constructed. The medium-strong aroma is woody with some hay.


The cold draw is good, with a flavor of hay and allspice. The first puffs give coffee and dirt with pepper. There are spices as well. After that, it’s spicy and strong leather that tickles the back of the throat. Soon after the nuttiness from the Corojo wrapper shows up as well. To balance everything, there’s mild fruity citrus. The flavors change to nuts, leather, wood, hay, and sweetness. In the final third, the cigar has more wood, the sweetness and pepper are still there. The nut flavor is gone. The cigar starts to tingle in the back of the throat again.


The draw is great. The pepper and salt colored ash isn’t very firm though. The smoke is thick and plentiful and the burn is straight as an arrow. This is a medium-full bodied cigar, full-flavored. Well balanced, with character. But it’s not smooth. This is a cigar for a more experienced cigar smoker. The smoke time is three hours.

Would I buy this cigar again? Yes

number92

Categories: Honduran cigars, 92, Rocky Patel, El Paraiso | Tags: , , , | Leave a comment

Luis Martinez Silver Selection Churchill

Luis Martinez Silver Selection Churchill. A brand with a history going back to 1876 when Don Luis Martinez opened his cigar factory in Cuba. And now, almost 150 years later, the brand still remains. Not as a Cuban brand though, but as part of the portfolio of J.C. Newman. And as a budget brand, both machine-made and hand-made. The machine-made cigars are produced in Tampa. The handmade cigars hail from J.C. Newman’s PENSA factory in Esteli, Nicaragua.


The Luis Martinez Silver Edition is the premium line of this budget-friendly brand. It is made in several different sizes, and some of the sizes come in beautiful glass tubes. Like this 7×48 Churchill. The blend consists of three year aged Nicaraguan and Honduran fillers. The binder comes from Nicaragua. The wrapper is a Sun Grown leaf from Ecuador.


The beautiful and colorful ring is on the outside of the glass tube. The cigar isn’t completely straight, that’s the first thing noticeable when taking the cigar out of the tube. The color of the wrapper is beautiful, but it feels and looks a bit dry. It’s not oily, but there aren’t any ugly veins. So looks-wise, this cigar isn’t good, but it’s not bad either. The aroma is bad though, think fish market mixed with urine. And all quite strong. My wife smelled the cigars and said “these stink like unwashed private parts”.


The cold draw is great and very peppery. A mix of white pepper and chili pepper. Once lit, it’s dark roast coffee, pepper, earthiness, and sourness. The first puffs aren’t promising much for the rest of the cigar. The sourness takes control, and it’s not a pleasant sourness. Some sweetness shows up too, but not enough to neutralize the sour flavor of the cigar. The sourness slowly tones down a little, giving the sweetness and the pepper some more space. Slowly a little wood flavor shows up as well. But the sour flavor, like milk that has gone bad, ruins everything. At the end of the first third, some vanilla shines through. Which is an improvement? The second third is less sour. It starts with a sweet, old book taste and wood. Sweet chocolate comes in play halfway in the cigar. It’s not as bad anymore. There are hints of citrus and vanilla as well. Near the end, pepper grows.


The draw is great. Construction-wise there is nothing wrong with this cigar. The light-colored ash is pretty, yet not too firm. The smoke is plenty in volume, but not very thick. This is a cigar that directly competes with J.C. Newman’s best selling bundle cigar Quorum. It delivers the same, yet is more expensive than Quorum. As much as I love J.C. Newman, this cigar won’t get much love from us. It’s medium-bodied, medium flavored. The smoke time is a little over two hours.

Would I buy this cigar again? Hell no!

number86

Categories: 86, Luis Martinez, Nicaraguan cigars, PENSA | Tags: , , , , , | Leave a comment

Charatan Colina Robusto

Charatan Colina Robusto. The name Charatan might not be known to many cigar smokers unless you are familiar with the British market. Charatan is a brand founded in Britain, and only available there for now. The brand was founded by Frederick Charatan in 1863 as a pipe brand. He carved Meerschaum pipes and briar pipes. Frederik’s son Reuben took over the business and until 1960, it was a family business. Dunhill Tobacco of London acquired the brand and launched Charatan pipe tobaccos, which were a success. And in the early 21st century, Charatan cigars came on the market. These cigars were blended specifically to the preferences of the British cigar smokers. The brand quickly became the best selling new world cigar in the United Kingdom.


Fast forward, 2 years ago, the British tobacco distributor Tor Imports acquired the brand. The production was moved to Joya de Nicaragua and the blend was tweaked to attract a new generation of cigar smokers. Ministry of Cigars reviewed the new blend last year. Tor Imports also released a limited edition to commemorate the ownership. The Charatan Colina. And that name has a meaning. Colina means hill. Tor means hill. Add that Tor Imports is located on top of a hill in Devon, U.K., and you will see the significance of the name. The cigar is made in one size only, 5½x52, in limited production. The filler is all Nicaraguan. The binder and wrapper are Indonesian. Besuki for the binder, and shade-grown tobacco from Java as a wrapper.


The wrapper is dark for a shade-grown wrapper. The ring looks very much like a Davidoff ring, white with golden dots, but not as high quality as Davidoff. The logo has a unicorn, which embodies the craft and heritage of Charatan. It is a symbol of mythology, individuality, and as the national animal of Scotland – of quintessential Britishness. The wrapper is dark, Colorado Maduro colored with beautiful smudges. The triple cap is gorgeous, and the cigar feels well constructed. The cigar has a strong aroma. Green spices, stock cubes, that kind of aroma.


The cold draw is great. And once lit, the cigar is earthy, spicy with a little salt. The cigar remains slightly salty, with herbal flavors, a little coffee, and soil. There is a little bit of grass and sweetness too, that show up in the retrohale. The flavors are smooth, mellow, and balanced. The cigar slowly develops more of a spice flavor palate. Nutmeg, cinnamon, allspice., but with some earthiness, leather, and pepper. The sweetness becomes stronger, with a citrus sourness. There is also a slight nuttiness. The cigar gets more character, without losing the smoothness. More dry flavors, such as hay and dried wood. But still with the pepper, the spices, and the nuttiness. The final third starts sweet with nuts, pepper, and spices. The sweetness is like liquid sugar. The sweetness slowly evolves to marzipan though. With nuts, spices, pepper, leather, and wood.


The draw is great. The ash is like a stack of white and gray dimes. The smoke is good, blueish, and decent in volume and thickness. The burn is quite straight and slow. The cigar starts smooth, mellow, and well balanced but lacks character at first. That character shows up later, without losing the balance and smoothness. This is a medium-bodied cigar, medium-full flavored with an interesting evolution. The smoke time is three hours

Would I buy this cigar again? I want a box
number92

Categories: Nicaraguan cigars, 92, Fabrica de Tabacos Joya de Nicaragua, Charatan | Tags: , , , , | Leave a comment

Montecristo Double Edmundo

Montecristo Double Edmundo. In 2004, Habanos introduced the Montecristo Edmundo. A slightly longer and thicker robusto size, with a 52 ring gauge. And in 2006, they followed that up with the Montecristo Petit Edmundo. A slightly shorter, yet thicker robusto, again with a ring gauge of 52. 2010 saw a limited edition Grand Edmundo, almost 6 inches long and again with a 52 gauge. In 2013, Habanos released this Montecristo Double Edmundo, a 6⅛x50 Toro size. The first Edmundo with a ring gauge different than 52. The cigars are named after Edmundo Dantes, the hero of the Alexandro Dumas novel “The Count of Montecristo”. And that’s where Montecristo got his name from.


Mexico had three regional releases called Edmundo Dantes. Edmundo Dantes was released in 2007 and created by Max Gutmann, owner of the Mexican Habanos distributor. Because of the design similarities with Montecristo, people believed that these were Montecristo cigars, sold under the Edmundo Dantes brand. But that’s not the case. There are only three Edmundo Dante releases to date. As for the Montecristo Double Edmundo, it is a globally available cigar except for the United States. It is a regular production cigar so it’s being produced constantly. This cigar was a gift from the Cohiba Atmosphere Kuala Lumpur.


The color of the wrapper is nice, Colorado. And the wrapper is quite oily. But there are plenty of veins, it isn’t the prettiest wrapper out there. The ring is a classic, yet simple. Brown, white and gold. But the print quality is high. The cigar feels very soft, very squishy. There is no ammonia aroma, so that’s a plus. The cigar smells like hay, farm animals and barnyard. The aroma is quite strong.


The cold draw is very good. With vegetal and leather flavors. Salty and leathery are the first flavors that show up after lighting the cigar. After a few puffs, there is more leather, more salt, and some pepper. There’s also sugar. The flavors grow in strength, and some young wood shows up as well, just like green herbal flavors. The retrohale gives cedar and leather. The second third starts with leather, pepper, wood, soil, and a little coffee. Now and then there’s a hint of vanilla. Coffee, leather, and wood are the main flavors now. The final third starts harsh and rough. There is some vanilla, but the harshness is overpowering it.


The draw is great. The light-colored ash is dense and firm. The smoke is good. Thick and enough in volume. The burn is pretty even. It’s a medium-bodied, medium flavored cigar with a smoke time of two and a half hours.

Would I buy this cigar again? No, for half the price I can get a new world cigar that fits my palate much better

number89

Categories: 89, Cuban cigars, Montecristo (Habanos) | Tags: , , , , | Leave a comment

Henk Maori Masterpiece

Henk Maori Masterpiece. Henk is a luxury brand, mostly focussed on suitcases and travel bags. But designer and owner Heiko Poerz is also an avid cigar smoker for over thirty years. With his eye for detail, his and his attitude to always go for the best, he was unhappy with the cigars that were on the market. Nothing reached perfection for his palate. So he asked his friend, master blender Didier Houvenaghel, for help to create a cigar that would be tailor-made for Poerz. Houvenaghel makes cigars at Tabacalera A.J. Fernandez, so automatically, Henk cigars would be made there as well. Houvenaghel and Poerz created a blend with vintage tobaccos. The tobacco is expensive, but since Poerz doesn’t compromise quality, he pushed on. His obsession with cigars also created a whole line of accessories, including the Cigarbone and the Minibone.


The Maori name is a tribute to a mutual friend of Poerz and Houvenaghel. The friend is Maori, and when the cigar was in the development stage, the three friends met up in Bali, Indonesia. Poerz jokingly mentioned that the wrapper had the same color as their friend’s skin. The line suddenly had a name, a tribute to their Maori friend. That resulted in a Maori style tattoo logo for the cigars, and names related to the Maori heritage such as the Haka. The Henk Maori Haka scored 94 and ended up on the 4th place of Ministry of Cigars Top 25 of 2019. The Henk Maori Masterpiece is a limited edition figurado. It measures 6½x64 and is made with vintage tobaccos from Nicaragua. The cigars were released in 2018, in very limited production. The cigars came in a travel humidor with 7 cigars, limited to 200 travel humidors. And 12 humidors with 52 cigars. There are also a limited number of refills and singles available.


The cigar looks amazing. The shape is fantastic, and the small pieces of Maduro wrapper on the foot and the head make the cigars pop. The unfinished head and the tattoo make this cigar stand out in any humidor. The wrapper is Colorado Maduro colored, dry and has some veins. Without the veins, the cigar would have hit 100 out of 100 points. It feels pretty packed but evenly packed. The dark manure smell is medium strong.


The cold draw is good. There is a hint of milk chocolate but also a lot of pepper in the cold draw. Straight from the start, there is coffee, slightly bitter but on a pleasant level. The draw is surprisingly good from the start. Usually, there is a bit of a tight draw until the burn reached the thicker part of the foot. There are herbal sweetness, pepper, and fresh leather flavors as well. The retrohale gives more spice and cedar. The cigar has a nutmeg and cinnamon sweetness. At the thickest part of the cigar, there is cedar, soil, pepper, and sugary sweetness. The cigar is very pleasant in the retrohale. Coffee and toast show up, still with the cedar, sweetness, pepper, and spices. The mouthfeel is creamy. The spices turn to gingerbread spices, with cedar, leather, sweetness, and pepper. The mouthfeel is still creamy. In the last third, the cigar picks up more strength. Retrohaling is no longer an option. Wood, leather, coffee, spices, and pepper are the main flavors.


The draw is amazing. The burn had to be corrected a few times though. There is a good amount of thick, white smoke. The ash is white and firm. This is a smooth, balanced, and flavorful cigar. But it packs strength too, even though it’s smooth and creamy. It is a full-bodied, full-flavored cigar. Balanced, smooth and full of character. The smoke time is three hours and twenty minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? For a very special occasion
number93

Categories: 93, Henk, Nicaraguan cigars, Tabacalera A.J. Fernandez | Tags: , , , , , , ,

VegaFina 1998 VF52

VegaFina 1998 VF52. Tabacalera, the Spanish tobacco monopoly, founded VegaFina in 1998. Later Tabacalera merged with the French tobacco monopoly SEITA and formed Altadis. And last year, Altadis released the VegaFina 1998 in three sizes to commemorate the fact. The cigars are available on International markets only, and not in the USA. VegaFina has always focussed more on Europe than on the American market anyway. This blend was created by the master blenders with tobacco from five different countries. All the tobacco is aged for at least three years. The VegaFina 1998 is marketed as a premium offering from VegaFina, yet the prices are mid-range.


The complex blend of the cigar forced the blenders to bring their A-game. A dark Ecuadorian wrapper combined with an Indonesian binder from Java. For those that don’t know Indonesia that well, Java is the most populated of the 16.000 islands that make Indonesia what it is. For the last 400 years, tobacco is cultivated after the Dutch colonists brought tobacco seeds from their travels to the Caribbean. Sumatra, about 3 ½ times bigger than Java, is also a well-known tobacco-growing island. The filler comes from the Dominican Republic, Nicaragua, and Colombia. For this review, we selected the 5½x52 VF52


The wrapper is dark and oily. It does not have a smooth appearance, but the darkness and oil make up for it. The ring is different than the current VegaFina offerings. No slick logo with the silver VegaFina uses nowadays. This ring looks older. It’s probably the same design as VegaFina used in 1998. A throwback, going with the theme of commemorating the first VegaFina release. The slick black secondary ring with the white 1998 numbers looks good. The cigar has a nice bounce when gently squeezed. The aroma is mild woody.


The cold draw is great. There isn’t much flavor in the cold draw, just peppery wood, but mild. The cigar starts with coffee, green herbs, salt, and wood. The flavors evolve to coffee, wood, leather, and pepper. The mouthfeel is dry. Softwood pepper, spices, coffee, and earthiness. More pepper and some grassy flavors show up, and the cigar tastes a little burned. Halfway there is a mixture of green herbs, pepper, and nuts. The final third has wood, soil, and pepper. For a while, there was some faint vanilla flavor as well. The finale is earthy with pepper, wood, and sweetness.


The draw is a bit on the loose side, yet still acceptable. The ash is frayed. The burn had to be corrected a few times. The smoke is good. This is a medium-bodied, medium flavored cigar. It’s not smooth and the balance is a little off as well. The smoke time is two hours thirty-five.

Would I buy this cigar again? Meh

number89

Categories: 89, Casa de Garcia, Dominican cigars, VegaFina | Tags: , , , ,

Joya de Nicaragua Antano CT Robusto

Joya de Nicaragua Antano CT Robusto. In the United States, Joya de Nicaragua used to be known for the strong, bold cigars. Especially the Joya de Nicaragua Antaño lines carried that stigma. Both the Antaño and the Antaño Dark Corojo are on the fuller side of the spectrum. In Europe, Joya de Nicaragua made a name for itself with the milder Clasico line. But in the last few years, Joya de Nicaragua is releasing medium strong and mild cigars with the Joya Red, Silver, Black, and the Uno. And since last year, there is even a Connecticut Shade wrapped Joya de Nicaragua Antaño. The Joya de Nicaragua Antaño CT series. And Connecticut Shade is the exact opposite of a strong wrapper.


Last year, Joya de Nicaragua released the Antaño CT. With all Nicaraguan filler and a Nicaraguan binder. As the wrapper, an Ecuadorian Connecticut Shade was chosen. There are four sizes available, from the 6×54 Belicoso to the 5 ¼ x46 Corona Gorda. In between, you’ll find a 6×50 Toro and this 5×52 Robusto. Juan Martinez from Joya de Nicaragua gave me this cigar at the 2019 Intertabac trade show.


The cigar doesn’t look appealing due to the yellowish-brown color of the wrapper. There is a vein on the wrapper and the triple cap is sloppy. The ring makes up for it. Bright golden with red, clean and clear. The cigar feels well made. It’s evenly filled. The aroma is nice and strong. The cigar has a smell much like sawdust.


The cold draw is perfect, the ideal amount of resistance. And the flavor is strong, bold. Peppery raw tobacco, which is a promising sign. Once lit, there is sweetness, vinegar, and that classic Connecticut Shade mustiness with leather and sawdust. The cigar remains smooth with sweetness, mustiness, and leather. Slowly the wood is getting stronger and a little pepper shows up. The wood and sweetness now overpower that classic Connecticut Shade mustiness. There is also some hay in the flavor profile. The second third starts sweet with hints of dried leather, earthiness, spices, and pepper. The mouthfeel is creamy, something that is to be expected from a Connecticut Shade cigar. The final third has more pepper, but the sweetness remains the same. There is also a hint of milk chocolate.


The draw is phenomenal. The silver-gray ash is extremely dense. The smoke is thick, white and there is plenty of it. The burn is straight. This is a smooth cigar, medium-bodied and medium flavored. The smoke time is two hours

Would I buy this cigar again? It’s not bad for a Connecticut Shade, but I prefer different wrappers

number91

Categories: 91, Fabrica de Tabacos Joya de Nicaragua, Joya de Nicaragua, Nicaraguan cigars | Tags: , , , , ,

Kristoff GC Signature Series Robusto

Kristoff GC Signature Series Robusto. Glen Case hit a mid-life crisis in the early 2000s and wanted to do something else than the financial services he provided for close to 20 years. As an avid cigar aficionado, he pursued a dream of becoming a cigar brand owner. And he did. In 2004 he founded Kristoff cigars, named after his son Christopher. After doing his homework, Case settled for the Charles Fairmorn factory in the Dominican Republic as his manufacturing partner. And now, 16 years later, the Kristoff cigars are sold in every corner of the world. And praised by cigar magazines and cigar blogs for years.


The Kristoff GC Signature Series was released mid-2011 at the IPCPR Trade Show. The blend was created for the cigar smoker with a well-educated palate and who likes a full-bodied cigar. To create a blend with notes that would entice these experienced, demanding smokers Case and the blenders used a Brazilian Maduro wrapper. For the binder, they took a Dominican leaf. The filler consists of all Cuban seed tobacco, from Nicaragua, Honduras, and the Dominican Republic. The robusto that we are reviewing measures 5½x54.


Kristoff cigars always look cool. The pigtail and closed foot are always bonus points for looks. The thick, dark and oily Brazilian Maduro wrapper isn’t the cleanest looking wrapper ever. But for a Brazilian wrapper, it looks good. And it looks very tasty. The ring is quite simple, yet the embossing and that the red on the front fades to back make it stand out. The cigar feels well made. The aroma is divine, dark chocolate with a little spice although the aroma could be a bit stronger.


The cold draw is always an issue with closed footed cigars. But once lit, that issue is solved. Pepper with espresso, strong, in your face. The flavors then turn a bit more to wood and dry leather. But the dark chocolate that was promised shows up too. As always with a closed foot, the start of the cigar is a little rough, it’s hard to get the burn going. The retrohale gives notes of dried fruit. Dark chocolate is the main attraction, with spice, coffee, wood, and dried fruit as support. After a third, there’s still dark chocolate with creamy, thick sweetness, leather, wood, and mild black pepper. But there is also a salty flavor. The dark chocolate and dried fruit are the baselines, with a growing pepper flavor. There’s also more sweetness and a little citrus. The chocolate flavor is thick, it’s like slowly melting a piece of 70% dark chocolate in your mouth. It coats the whole palate. The final third still has that dark chocolate with dried fruit. But there is also pepper, spice, leather, and an earthy flavor. The chocolate remains the strongest flavor, yet the pepper grows. And there is still some wood as well. Near the end, a nut flavor shows up as well, while the pepper mellows out. Hazelnuts to be precise.


The draw is great, after a rocky start. But that rocky start is normal with a closed foot. The burn is good. The white ash is quite firm. The smoke is sufficient, but it would be nicer if the smoke was thicker. The cigar is balanced yet a little rough around the edges. In a good way, it’s not smooth. But it shows character with balance, and that’s always good. The flavors are both in your face, yet with subtle flavors beyond the baseline flavors. That makes the cigar intriguing. The smoke time is two hours and forty-five minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? I want boxes!
number92

Categories: Dominican cigars, 92, Kristoff, Charles Fairmorn | Tags: , , , ,

Mi Querida Triqui Traca 552

Mi Querida Triqui Traca 552. When Dunbarton Tobacco & Trust owner Steve Saka was asked to make a firecracker for 2 Guys Smokeshop, he obliged. He was not the first to make a 2 Guys exclusive limited-edition firecracker. The shop has one made annually, it’s always a 3×50 sized cigar with a long tail mimicking a firecracker. For the Mi Querida version of the firecracker, Saka tweaked the blend to be a little stronger. That cigar was a hit, and last year the blend was released as regular production in two sizes. A 5×52 Robusto and a 6×48 Toro. Out of respect for the 2 Guys smoke shop, Saka never released the original vitola.


But he kept a link to the original release. Firecrackers tied together are called Triqui Traca in Nicaraguan slang. And that’s the name of the new blend, Mi Querida Triqui Traca. The cigars are made at the NACSA factory, under the watchful eye of Raul Disla. The binder and filler are all Nicaraguan. The wrapper is a high-grade Connecticut Broadleaf from the United States. The cigars are available for Dunbarton Tobacco & Trust distributors worldwide.


The wrapper is thick, leathery, dark, and oily. It looks tasty. The elegant thin ring is firecracker red with a golden print. It’s the same as the original Mi Querida, except in another color. But if you look closely, there is embossing on the ring as well. Just by the looks, this cigar is going to be strong and tasty. The cigar feels well constructed, the cap is impeccable. The cigar has a strong aroma of wood and barnyard.


The cold draw is great. It has a dry taste of hay. The first puff is strong coffee with spices. There is a bitterness that comes close to dark chocolate, complex but without the chocolate flavor. There is also hay and sweetness. A little leather is noticeable in the retrohale. The sweetness grows a little, just as the hay and vegetable flavors. There is a hint of dark chocolate and some pepper as well. The pepper and leather pick up, with some hay. That all while the sweetness makes space for some herbs and spices. In the second third, the power picks up. More wood, leather, but also more dark chocolate and spices. There’s still pepper as well. It’s getting harder to retrohale. There are some hard to describe flavors as well, earthy, muddy but that is not precise enough. Halfway there’s also some walnut. In the final third, coffee returns. With earthy flavors, wood, pepper, and spices. The walnut flavor is lingering on the background. Some citrus acidity ties all the flavors together.


The draw is fantastic. The first third is smooth, balanced yet with character and complexity. Not as strong as suspected. The smoke is thick and full. The burn is straight and slow. The cigar has a great evolution and built up. It starts medium strong, smooth and balanced, and grows to a strong yet balanced and complex cigar. The smoke time is two hours and forty-five minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? I can’t wait to get my hands on more

number92

Categories: Nicaraguan cigars, 92, Mi Querida, Nicaragua American Cigars S.A. | Tags: , , , , ,

Balmoral Añejo XO Gordo

Balmoral Añejo XO Gordo. In 2014, Royal Agio launched the Balmoral Añejo XO series. It was the follow up for the every successful Balmoral Añejo 18 release. The latter had an 18-year-old Brazilian wrapper. But when Royal Agio ran out of that wrapper, they created the Balmoral Añejo XO, still with aged tobacco but in larger supply. And the line was a success from the start. Worldwide, and it put the Balmoral brand on the map in the United States.


Today, there are 4 different Balmoral Añejo lines. The Añejo XO, the Añejo XO Connecticut, Oscuro, and Nicaragua. But the Balmoral Añejo XO Gordo was used as an event-only cigar in several countries. Due to the Covid-19 crisis, Royal Agio decided to release the cigar to all retailers last month. With so many people working from home, and more time on their hands, they could enjoy this Gordo without having to go to events. Events that are prohibited in most countries anyway during the pandemic.


The cigar is impressive. Big, thick, and aggressively looking. Brazilian Arapiraca tobacco isn’t the smoothest looking tobacco in the world. It’s rough and tough-looking with veins. It’s the Danny Trejo under the tobaccos. The ring makes up for it though. contemporary design. Gray, off white and gold. Stylish. The foot ring is in the same style. The cigar feels well constructed, evenly spongy all over. The aroma is peppery with dark chocolate.


The cold draw is very easy. The cigar has a dry tobacco flavor. After lighting there’s an immediate flavor explosion. Coffee, pepper, and sweetness. Slowly a mild spice shows up, herbal almost, with some leather. The herbal flavor starts to dominate and is supported by charred wood and earthiness. Some salt shows up as well, and the mouthfeel is mild creamy. After a third, there’s pepper, wood, grass, and some spices. The sweetness then reappears with more spices, wood, leather, and pepper. The wood flavor is a bit charred, like barbecue.


The draw is open, light, easy. Too open. There is a lot of smoke, white but it’s a little thin though. The burn has to be corrected several times as well. The cigar is smooth and mellow. Due to the wrapper filler ratio, the cigar lacks a bit of character. It is milder than the smaller sizes of the same blend. The cigar is medium-bodied, medium flavored. The smoke time is three hours and thirty minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? The blend yes, the size no!

number89

Categories: 89, Agio Caribbean Tobacco Company, Balmoral, Dominican cigars | Tags: , , , ,

Create a free website or blog at WordPress.com.