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San Pedro de Macoris Sun Grown Corona

San Pedro de Macoris Sun Grown Corona. A long name for a cigar. But a good name is you know the reason for it. The Royal Agio factory is located in the town of San Pedro de Macoris. And to honor the people from the town that works for Royal Agio, the Wintermans family named a cigar line after the town. A cigar line that started out with an Ecuador and Brazil blend. But now there is also a Nicaraguan blend and this Sun Grown blend. Royal Agio is now part of Scandinavian Tobacco Group and taken off the American market. What will happen with the brand is unsure of the new owners. Scandinavian Tobacco group doesn’t have the best track record when it comes to acquiring brands and doing them well. You can read more about Agio in articles about the history of the brand part one and part two on the affiliated site Ministry of Cigars.

This cigar is available in several sizes. A small Perla. A classic Robusto. The unavoidable Gran Toro. And then this 5⅞x42 Corona. The filler contains tobacco from the Dominican Republic, Nicaragua, and the Agio signature Brazil. The binder comes from the Dominican Republic. The wrapper is Ecuadorian Habano. The San Pedro de Macoris lines are all budget-friendly. This corona comes in at €3.70 in Germany, the largest cigar market in Europe. But even the 6×52 Gran Toro comes in below 5 euro. Earlier I did a review of the San Pedro de Macoris Nicaragua Corona, San Pedro de Macoris Brazil Robusto, and the San Pedro de Macoris Ecuador Robusto.

The cigar looks nice. Somehow slender cigars look more elegant than robusto sized cigars or thicker. More sophisticated. The ring pops, matte black with bright yellow, red, blue, and silver. The wrapper is Colorado colored and feels like very fine sandpaper. The construction feels great. The medium-strong aroma is on the darker side of the palate Wood, earthiness, manure, those kinds of smell.

The cold draw is fine with a classic raw tobacco flavor. After lighting the cigar releases chocolate, coffee, leather, and soil. The mouthfeel is a bit sticky, thick, textured. Those flavors hang around for a bit, with some sweetness from the Brazilian tobacco, and a hint of black pepper. After a third, the flavors change to that cocoa flavor but with hay and more pepper. That hay becomes stronger and some cedar shows up as well. The mouthfeel remains textured and thick. In the last third, there is more cedar but the cocoa flavor deteriorates to a slightly unpleasant flavor.

The ash is dark, almost black. It is not firm either. The draw is fantastic. The smoke is thick and white. The burn is straight. This is a medium-bodied and medium flavored cigar. The smoke time is an hour and forty-five minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? No

Categories: 89, Agio Caribbean Tobacco Company, Dominican cigars, San Pedro de Macoris | Tags: , , , ,

Royal Danish Double Ligero Short Robusto

Royal Danish Double Ligero Short Robusto. This is a cigar that is jam-packed with ligero fillers, making it a very strong cigar. Or at least, that’s what the warning on the label says. Double Ligero, extra strong. Blended in Denmark according to the ring, but made in Nicaragua. And that last part plays a big role in the new name of Royal Danish Cigars. The trademark for the brand is stripped by the Danish Royal Family. The new name is King of Ashes, House of Nicaragua.

This cigar is made in Nicaragua, but not a lot of the blend is revealed. Just that it’s packed with ligero fillers. The wrapper is Ecuadorian Habano. And the size, a 4½x54 Short Robusto. Even the manufacturer is undisclosed. Now, with the name change, it remains to be seen if this particular brand will return to the market. Time will tell.

The Colorado Maduro colored wrapper is rustic looking. The triple cap is a bit sloppy, making this cigar far from beautiful. The black and golden ring is nice though, with a Danish flag wearing a crown. The secondary ring is simple, white, and red. It only tells us that it’s double ligero, extra strong. And that the cigar is blended in Denmark. The construction feels good. The medium-strong aroma is woody.

The cold draw is good. The flavor is very spicy, very peppery. A tingling sensation on the lips before the cigar is even lit. The first puffs are strong, full of coffee, soil, pepper, dark chocolate, dry wood, and hay. With a little tickle in the back of the throat. Slowly the cigar gets more leather, some sweetness, yet still with pepper, coffee, and wood. The mouthfeel is very dry. The spices and sweetness gain strength, the wood, chocolate, and pepper remain while the other flavors disappear. The final third has more cedar, soil, pepper, and spices. There is also a little nuttiness. All balanced though, but strong.

The draw is fine, no complaints there. The burn is straight as an arrow. The salt and pepper colored ash is firm. The light blue smoke has a good volume, yet it could be a tad thicker. This cigar is full-bodied, medium-full flavored. The strength does pack a lot of nicotine and can cause a light-headed feeling. The smoke time is one hour and forty-five minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? Once in a while

Categories: 89, Nicaraguan cigars, Royal Danish | Tags: , , ,

Davtian Rubina Corona

Davtian Rubina Corona. One of the twelve cigars from Davtian Cigars. The company produces six lines in the Dominican Republic. Each line exists in two sizes. The Rubina is available in a Corona and a Petit Corona with the name The Queen. I reviewed Davtian Trinidad, Davtian Habana, and Davtian Primus before. Davtian is making cigars since 2011 when the Armenian entrepreneur David Davtian founded the brand.

This 6×46 Corona comes from Tabacalera El Puente. This 6×46 Davtian Rubina Corona is a Dominican Puro with a Habano 2000 Rojizo wrapper. The binder is Piloto Cubano Seco. For the filler, Davtian utilizes San Vicente Viso and Seco, Criollo 98 Viso, and Piloto Cubano Viso. Davtian cigars are available in Southern Africa, South East Asia, and some European markets including The Netherlands.

It is a good looking cigar. A Maduro colored wrapper, oily, but with a vein or two facing the front. A nicely shaped golden and black ring. The triple cap is a bit sloppy though. The construction feels good. There is a mild leather aroma coming from the cigar.

The cold draw is fine, with the right air resistance. There is a sweetness, some spice, leather, and hay in the cold draw. Quite a lot of flavors to taste in the cold draw. Once lit, the cigar gives mild chocolate, earthiness, coffee, and a hint of spice. Quickly followed by complex wood. The mouthfeel is sticky. Wood becomes the main flavor, with something grassy in the background. The mouthfeel changes to creamy. With some leather, wood, and soil. After a third, the main flavor is wood with a little nutmeg. The final third starts with a crisp wood flavor and strong pepper. Later on, leather joins the two flavors.

The draw is phenomenal. The ash is firm and light gray, almost tin-colored. The smoke is a little thin, although the volume gets more along the way. The burn is straight and slow. This cigar is medium-bodied, yet the flavor is medium-full. The smoke time is two and a half hours.

Would I buy this cigar again? No, this is not a cigar that fits my palate

Categories: 89, Davtian, Dominican cigars, Tabacalera El Puente | Tags: , , , ,

Umnum Honduras Robusto

Umnum Honduras Robusto. A strange name for a cigar that’s gaining traction in Europe. Handmade cigars, from Nicaragua or Honduras depending on the blend. And dirt cheap. This robusto has a price tag of €2,30 in Germany, making it one of the cheapest handmade cigars on the market. Where the name Umnum comes from, we have no idea. Google didn’t tell us anything. The only umnum we found is a tiny village in the West Papua province of Indonesia. But that region is too cold to grow tobacco, and only the Nicaragua blend uses some Indonesian tobacco.

There are two blends. The first one is a Nicaraguan puro. I reviewed the Umnum Nicaragua Bond some time ago. The second blend is the Umnum Honduras. It’s made at an undisclosed factory in Honduras. The wrapper is Honduran with a Mexican binder. The filler tobaccos are from Nicaragua and Honduras. The robusto measures 5×50 but there are several other sizes available. From a Petit Corona called Bond to a 4¾x60 Jumbo and a few more in between.

The cigar doesn’t look like a cheap cigar. The ring is beautiful. Matte Black with a shiny copper-colored logo of a traditional image, probably Mayan. The wrapper itself is Colorado colored and has the looks of Corojo. Dryish, with the feel of fine sandpaper. The veins are thin. The cigar feels well constructed. The aroma is medium strong. It has forests smell with a hint of something like old urine. It’s not the most pleasant aroma we ever experienced, but also not the worst.

The cold draw is fine but has that dried dusty flavor of Connecticut Shade. Once lit there is a strong coffee flavor, slightly acidic. The flavor is a little rough around the edges. The coffee and acidity remain, but now with some sweetness, dried leaves, and musty wood. At the end of the first third, the cigar has a very unpleasant flavor. The sour flavor is ruining everything else. The second third is musty, dried leaves, and a little harsh. The acidity is still there but at a tolerable level. There is a bit of a burned wood and nuts flavor as well. The final third starts with peanuts. The acidity is completely gone. There is a bit more sweetness. The cigar completely changes from bad to great. A nice, balanced combination of black pepper, sweetness, leather, wood, coffee, and nuts. 

The construction is great. The draw, the burn, and the smoke are of high quality. Straight burn, although we had to correct it once, halfway. Thick, white smoke. Good draw. White ash. The flavors are medium to full. But not well rounded, too acidic. But the last third is a game-changer. It’s day and night. The smoke time is three hours fifteen minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? Based on the first and second third, no. Based on the final third, yes.

Categories: 89, Honduran cigars, Umnum | Tags: , , , ,

Davtian Trinidad Robusto Gordo

Davtian Trinidad Robusto Gordo. The brand was founded by the Armenian businessman and cigars aficionado David Davtian in 2011. That was 8 years after Davtian became a retailer and distributor for several Non-Cuban brands for Armenia. And five years after he became the chairman of the Armenian Association. He traveled to all the cigar producing countries in the Caribbean and decided that the Dominican Republic would be the country for his own brand. Davtian Cigars was born. Ministry of Cigars reviewed the Davtian Davtian Trinidad and the Davtian Primus Robusto Gordo last year.

According to the Davtian website, this cigar measures 5×57. But the cigar doesn’t look that tick. The Herics cigar tape was brought in as the judge and the cigar came in as a ring 56, which is still way thicker than the cigar looks. The blend information on the website is pretty detailed. Not much is known about the factory though. Tabacalera El Puente is a factory in the Dominican Republic. In Santiago to be precise but the website is empty and not much information is found online.

The cap is a nice twist cap, like a flat pigtail. The black and matte silver ring has a nice, unusual shape. It doesn’t say which line it is though, so you need to have access to the internet to know which blend you’re smoking. The Colorado Maduro colored wrapper looks leathery, with one thin, sharp vein on the side. The cigar feels well constructed, there are no knots of soft spots detectable. The aroma is full, thick with a barnyard and dried softwood smell.

The cold draw is smooth. The flavors in the cold draw are not. Sharp, strong, dry, and peppery. Once lit, the cigar has a dry yet full flavor of coffee with leather, and spice. The flavors are dry, very dry. The coffee fades away, the leather and the spice remain with some earthiness and dry dark wood. Slowly cinnamon becomes more dominant, with a little white pepper. After a third, the cigar tastes like dry leather, strong spice, white pepper, and has some acidity as well. On the border of the final third, the cigar shows signs of cocoa powder as well, with the previously mentioned flavors. In the final third, the cigar turns more to dry wood, spice, earthiness, yet without losing the leather.

The draw is a bit on the loose side. There is a good amount of white smoke coming from the cigar. The ash is firm yet a little coarse. The color is light gray. The burn is okay, not razor sharp but on the other hand, it doesn’t need correction either. This is a medium to medium-full bodied cigar, medium flavored. Even though the mouthfeel is very dry, it’s enjoyable. The smoke time is two hours and thirty minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? Possibly.

Categories: 89, Davtian, Dominican cigars, Tabacalera El Puente | Tags: , , , ,

Montecristo Double Edmundo

Montecristo Double Edmundo. In 2004, Habanos introduced the Montecristo Edmundo. A slightly longer and thicker robusto size, with a 52 ring gauge. And in 2006, they followed that up with the Montecristo Petit Edmundo. A slightly shorter, yet thicker robusto, again with a ring gauge of 52. 2010 saw a limited edition Grand Edmundo, almost 6 inches long and again with a 52 gauge. In 2013, Habanos released this Montecristo Double Edmundo, a 6⅛x50 Toro size. The first Edmundo with a ring gauge different than 52. The cigars are named after Edmundo Dantes, the hero of the Alexandro Dumas novel “The Count of Montecristo”. And that’s where Montecristo got his name from.


Mexico had three regional releases called Edmundo Dantes. Edmundo Dantes was released in 2007 and created by Max Gutmann, owner of the Mexican Habanos distributor. Because of the design similarities with Montecristo, people believed that these were Montecristo cigars, sold under the Edmundo Dantes brand. But that’s not the case. There are only three Edmundo Dante releases to date. As for the Montecristo Double Edmundo, it is a globally available cigar except for the United States. It is a regular production cigar so it’s being produced constantly. This cigar was a gift from the Cohiba Atmosphere Kuala Lumpur.


The color of the wrapper is nice, Colorado. And the wrapper is quite oily. But there are plenty of veins, it isn’t the prettiest wrapper out there. The ring is a classic, yet simple. Brown, white and gold. But the print quality is high. The cigar feels very soft, very squishy. There is no ammonia aroma, so that’s a plus. The cigar smells like hay, farm animals and barnyard. The aroma is quite strong.


The cold draw is very good. With vegetal and leather flavors. Salty and leathery are the first flavors that show up after lighting the cigar. After a few puffs, there is more leather, more salt, and some pepper. There’s also sugar. The flavors grow in strength, and some young wood shows up as well, just like green herbal flavors. The retrohale gives cedar and leather. The second third starts with leather, pepper, wood, soil, and a little coffee. Now and then there’s a hint of vanilla. Coffee, leather, and wood are the main flavors now. The final third starts harsh and rough. There is some vanilla, but the harshness is overpowering it.


The draw is great. The light-colored ash is dense and firm. The smoke is good. Thick and enough in volume. The burn is pretty even. It’s a medium-bodied, medium flavored cigar with a smoke time of two and a half hours.

Would I buy this cigar again? No, for half the price I can get a new world cigar that fits my palate much better

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Categories: 89, Cuban cigars, Montecristo (Habanos) | Tags: , , , ,

VegaFina 1998 VF52

VegaFina 1998 VF52. Tabacalera, the Spanish tobacco monopoly, founded VegaFina in 1998. Later Tabacalera merged with the French tobacco monopoly SEITA and formed Altadis. And last year, Altadis released the VegaFina 1998 in three sizes to commemorate the fact. The cigars are available on International markets only, and not in the USA. VegaFina has always focussed more on Europe than on the American market anyway. This blend was created by the master blenders with tobacco from five different countries. All the tobacco is aged for at least three years. The VegaFina 1998 is marketed as a premium offering from VegaFina, yet the prices are mid-range.


The complex blend of the cigar forced the blenders to bring their A-game. A dark Ecuadorian wrapper combined with an Indonesian binder from Java. For those that don’t know Indonesia that well, Java is the most populated of the 16.000 islands that make Indonesia what it is. For the last 400 years, tobacco is cultivated after the Dutch colonists brought tobacco seeds from their travels to the Caribbean. Sumatra, about 3 ½ times bigger than Java, is also a well-known tobacco-growing island. The filler comes from the Dominican Republic, Nicaragua, and Colombia. For this review, we selected the 5½x52 VF52


The wrapper is dark and oily. It does not have a smooth appearance, but the darkness and oil make up for it. The ring is different than the current VegaFina offerings. No slick logo with the silver VegaFina uses nowadays. This ring looks older. It’s probably the same design as VegaFina used in 1998. A throwback, going with the theme of commemorating the first VegaFina release. The slick black secondary ring with the white 1998 numbers looks good. The cigar has a nice bounce when gently squeezed. The aroma is mild woody.


The cold draw is great. There isn’t much flavor in the cold draw, just peppery wood, but mild. The cigar starts with coffee, green herbs, salt, and wood. The flavors evolve to coffee, wood, leather, and pepper. The mouthfeel is dry. Softwood pepper, spices, coffee, and earthiness. More pepper and some grassy flavors show up, and the cigar tastes a little burned. Halfway there is a mixture of green herbs, pepper, and nuts. The final third has wood, soil, and pepper. For a while, there was some faint vanilla flavor as well. The finale is earthy with pepper, wood, and sweetness.


The draw is a bit on the loose side, yet still acceptable. The ash is frayed. The burn had to be corrected a few times. The smoke is good. This is a medium-bodied, medium flavored cigar. It’s not smooth and the balance is a little off as well. The smoke time is two hours thirty-five.

Would I buy this cigar again? Meh

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Categories: 89, Casa de Garcia, Dominican cigars, VegaFina | Tags: , , , ,

Balmoral Añejo XO Gordo

Balmoral Añejo XO Gordo. In 2014, Royal Agio launched the Balmoral Añejo XO series. It was the follow up for the every successful Balmoral Añejo 18 release. The latter had an 18-year-old Brazilian wrapper. But when Royal Agio ran out of that wrapper, they created the Balmoral Añejo XO, still with aged tobacco but in larger supply. And the line was a success from the start. Worldwide, and it put the Balmoral brand on the map in the United States.


Today, there are 4 different Balmoral Añejo lines. The Añejo XO, the Añejo XO Connecticut, Oscuro, and Nicaragua. But the Balmoral Añejo XO Gordo was used as an event-only cigar in several countries. Due to the Covid-19 crisis, Royal Agio decided to release the cigar to all retailers last month. With so many people working from home, and more time on their hands, they could enjoy this Gordo without having to go to events. Events that are prohibited in most countries anyway during the pandemic.


The cigar is impressive. Big, thick, and aggressively looking. Brazilian Arapiraca tobacco isn’t the smoothest looking tobacco in the world. It’s rough and tough-looking with veins. It’s the Danny Trejo under the tobaccos. The ring makes up for it though. contemporary design. Gray, off white and gold. Stylish. The foot ring is in the same style. The cigar feels well constructed, evenly spongy all over. The aroma is peppery with dark chocolate.


The cold draw is very easy. The cigar has a dry tobacco flavor. After lighting there’s an immediate flavor explosion. Coffee, pepper, and sweetness. Slowly a mild spice shows up, herbal almost, with some leather. The herbal flavor starts to dominate and is supported by charred wood and earthiness. Some salt shows up as well, and the mouthfeel is mild creamy. After a third, there’s pepper, wood, grass, and some spices. The sweetness then reappears with more spices, wood, leather, and pepper. The wood flavor is a bit charred, like barbecue.


The draw is open, light, easy. Too open. There is a lot of smoke, white but it’s a little thin though. The burn has to be corrected several times as well. The cigar is smooth and mellow. Due to the wrapper filler ratio, the cigar lacks a bit of character. It is milder than the smaller sizes of the same blend. The cigar is medium-bodied, medium flavored. The smoke time is three hours and thirty minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? The blend yes, the size no!

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Categories: 89, Agio Caribbean Tobacco Company, Balmoral, Dominican cigars | Tags: , , , ,

Casa de Torres Especial 2020 Salomones

Casa de Torres Especial 2020 Salomones. For more than 20 years, the German cigar manufacturer August Schuster has been making Casa de Torres. Well, they don’t make them as they do with most of their other brands in Germany. But the have it made in an undisclosed factory in Nicaragua. And for the last few years, they launch an annual limited edition. For 2020, that limited edition is a Salomones.


The salomones measures 7 inches with a 54 ring. For the blend, Schuster decided on all Nicaraguan fillers. The binder comes from South East Asia, Indonesia to be more specific. And the wrapper is a Colorado Claro colored Connecticut from Ecuador. It is unclear how many boxes were produced.


The shape is amazing. The mild oily, Colorado Claro wrapper looks delicate. Like high grade yet thin leather. The cigar feels well made. And the double ring looks nice on this cigar. The blue, gold and white color scheme works well with the shade of the wrapper. The cigar has a pleasant aroma. Smells from a barnyard but mixed with spiced apple pie straight from the oven.


The cold draw is good. It leaves a very dry raw tobacco flavor with raisins on the palate. But there is also a little mustiness, which is a trademark for Connecticut Shade tobacco. After lighting, there is a lot of sweetness, dry cedar, and that mustiness. Some nutty flavor and pepper show up after a few puffs. The mustiness from the Connecticut wrapper is strong. On the other hand, the Connecticut wrapper gives a lot of cream as well. Slowly but surely, the nuttiness and cream push the mustiness to the background. There are still some cedar, leather, spice, and pepper flavors. At the end of the first third, there is cedar, pepper, spice, leather, and even some grass. All with a creamy mouthfeel. The mustiness makes a comeback with cedar, pepper, sugar, leather, and a little earthiness on top of the mild nutty and creamy flavors. The sweetness and the pepper take over in the last third. But there is also some coffee. The cigar is smooth enough to retrohale, even in the last part. The cigar gets a little salt as well, and a fruity flavor.


The draw is fine, even after cutting a very small bit of the cap. That left only a small smoke channel, yet the draw is good. The smoke is thick, white and there is plenty of it. The burn had to be corrected though. This cigar is mild to medium-bodied, medium flavored. It’s smooth and balanced, but it lacks character. That is the case with most Connecticut Shade cigars. It is hard to blend something mild with character. The cigar is mild to medium-bodied and medium flavored. The smoke time is two hours and forty-five minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? Nope, it’s Connecticut Shade

number89

Categories: 89, Casa de Torres, Nicaraguan cigars | Tags: , , , ,

Muestra de Tabac Trifecta Brazilian Mata Fina & Sumatra

Muestra de Tabac Trifecta Brazilian Mata Fina & Sumatra. That is a long name for a very unique cigar. So unique that Tabac Trading Company has a patent-pending. The owner of Tabac Trading is Patrick Potter, who grew up in a tobacco store. His grandfather owned the original Tinder Box. Five years ago, in 2015, Potter decided to start a cigar company and traveled over Latin America to learn from experienced blenders. He has seen farms in every country, learned all about fermentation, characteristics of the tobacco and how to blend them together. And with his creativity, he developed the Trifecta line.


There are three different blends in the Trifecta series. For this review, we decided to go for the Brazilian Mata Fina & Sumatra. That’s the one with the green label. This perfecto can be smoked from both sides. The ring is mirrored, so it looks right from whatever side you smoke it. One side has a Sumatra wrapper, the other side has a Mata Fina wrapper. The binder is viso from Cameroon. The fillers all come from Nicaragua, where this cigar is produced.


The cigar looks odd. The shape, the ring that can be read upside down and the two-tone wrapper. The biggest part of the cigar has a darker colored wrapper, rough so that must be the Mata Fina. The other side has a smoother oily wrapper, which is the Sumatra. It would have looked nicer if the ring was exactly in the middle, and both wrappers would have an equal part of the cigar. But the idea is very cool. There is no cap, both sides are open. The cigar feels well constructed, although both ends feel a little soft. There is a strong barnyard aroma to this cigar. The ring is golden with the Tabac Trading Co logo on it and then two green stripes on the side. The stripes have the word Trifecta on it, mirrored. The design could be a little better, less plain, more exciting.


The cold draw is good. The cigar has a bit of dark chocolate, but also a sourness in the flavor profile before being lit. The call was made to light the Sumatra part of the wrapper. The cigar tastes like coffee, sugar, dried leaves and herbs. The sweetness is like powdered sugar. The leaves are slowly growing in strength just as the green herbs. A little musky, nutty flavor shows up too, with a buttery, thick mouthfeel. The nut flavor becomes more pronounced over the spicy herbs from the Cameroon binder. There is a good dose of pepper in the flavor profile too. Right before the change of the wrapper, the cigar gets a nice chocolate flavor, with nuts, spices, leather, and pepper. The mouthfeel is creamy again. As expected the cigar gets sweeter once the Brazilian Mata Fina wrapper starts burning. The cigar remains to be balanced, but the balance isn’t as good as with the Sumatra wrapper. The pepper is getting stronger with the sweetness. The nuttiness returns, but not as strong as before. Pepper is overpowering all other flavors.


The draw is fine. The smoke is thick and plenty in volume, above average. The light-colored ash is firm. The burn needed to be corrected a few times. The cigar is medium-full bodied, medium-full flavored as well. The smoke time is two and a half hours.

Would I buy this cigar again? Yes

number89

Categories: 89, Muestra de Tabac, Nicaraguan cigars | Tags: , , , ,

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