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H. Upmann Noellas 2009 LCDH

H. Upmann Noellas 2009 LCDH. Up until the early 1980s, H. Upmann produced the 5⅜x42 Noellas as a regular production. And the packaging was unique. The cigars didn’t come in wooden boxes. Instead, they came in glass jars. In 2009, Habanos brought those jars back in a limited edition. 5000 glass jars were made to be released to the La Casa del Habano franchises worldwide. As is often the case with Cuba, the cigars were only available late 2010, yet are considered a 2009 release.


In 2013 another batch was released in glass jars. Yet with the lack of communication from Habanos, nobody knows for sure if those were another re-release. It could just as well be part of the 2009 release that just wasn’t shipped to the La Casa del Habano tobacconists three years earlier. The cigar that we are reviewing comes from the 2009 release and has been aged in the jar in a humidor for a decade.


The cigar looks good. A Colorado colored wrapper. The wrapper is oily and looks quite smooth. The regular Upmann ring and the secondary La Casa del Habano ring aren’t a match. The triple cap looks good. The cigar is spongy, yet some spots are slightly softer than others. The aroma is mild, with the scent of hay and animals.


The cold draw is good, with a salty leathery flavor. From the get-go, it’s coffee, soil, leather, and some salt. The flavor then slowly evolves to more leather, some wood, and even a hint of chocolate. But the earthiness and salt never disappear. Suddenly the mouthfeel becomes creamy. The flavor remains salty and leathery, with wood but now also with grass. Halfway the flavors change, the cigar gets a hint of pepper, cumin, and a nutty flavor. Still slightly salty, although less pronounced. The leather is still there as well. In the last third, there is nuttiness, spice, pepper, and leather. The final few puffs bring wood, a lot of pepper, leather, and some sweetness.


The draw is great, no complaints about that department. The ash is quite dark though, and not very firm. The smoke is thick and voluminous. The cigar had to be relit a few times though. But the burn is pretty straight. This is a medium-bodied, medium flavored cigar. The smoke time is an hour and fifty minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? If it was 5 euros cheaper, I would
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Categories: 90, Cuban cigars, H. Upmann (Habanos) | Tags: , , ,

Gurkha Marquesa Toro

Gurkha Marquesa Toro, a cigar released by Gurkha Cigars in 2018. In three sizes, 5×52 Robusto, 6×54 Toro, and 5×54 Belicoso. All that Gurkha revealed about the production is that the cigars are made in the Dominican Republic. But since Gurkha doesn’t have a factory, they have to be made at a third person facility. Yet, that facility has not been disclosed. Gurkha uses a lot of producers, and by knowing who’s responsible it’s easier to weed out the bad Gurkha cigars from the good ones. Without knowing the manufacturer, smoking the Marquesa Toro is a gamble.

Gurkha is a very old brand, but the Gurkha brand we know now has been around for 30 years. It started when Kaizad Hansotia bought the brand for a few hundred dollars while enjoying a vacation. He met a guy making the cigars on the beach and bought the whole stock, including the brand name. And in thirty years, he built the brand into a powerhouse with many fans and even more haters. But one thing can’t be denied, if you haven’t heard of Gurkha cigars, you’re not a real cigar smoker. Whether you like them or not is a different question.

This is a beautiful cigar. A smooth, dark wrapper, oily, with little to none imperfections. A beautiful, vintage-looking ring finished this 6×64 Toro. This is an eye-catching cigar. The cigar feels well constructed, with the right bounciness when squeezed gently. The cigar doesn’t feel plugged or underfilled. The aroma is medium in strength. It has manure and a damps forest smell.

The cold draw is great. The taste of the cold draw is dry hay with red pepper. The first puffs give dried out leather with a little vanilla. Some nutmeg shows up too, with a very dry mouthfeel. Some powdered sugar sweetness is there as well. A charred wood flavor is next with lemon-like acidity. After a third, there is a flavor of low-grade chocolate on the back of the palate, with something that comes close to old paper. A very dusty flavor with a little bit of white pepper. The final third starts with softwood, black pepper, and some mild sweetness. The pepper grows in strength, with some herbal sweetness as a supporting flavor.

The draw is good, good resistance in airflow. The burn is straight and slow. Even after the cigar dropped from the ashtray on the desk to the floor. The smoke is good. There is enough volume although the smoke is a little thin. The light-colored ash is firm. The Gurkha Marquesa Toro is a medium-bodied, medium flavored cigar. The smoke time is two hours and thirty minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? No, it scores high due to the construction and the looks, but flavor-wise it’s a middle of the road cigar at best

Categories: 90, Dominican cigars, Gurkha | Tags: , , ,

Undercrown Dogma 2019 Toro

Undercrown Dogma 2019 Toro. This box-pressed toro was released in 2019 to commemorate the 5th birthday of the collaboration between Drew Estate and the online cigar community Cigar Dojo. In 2014, the two teamed up for the initial release of the Undercrown Dogma, and that collaboration has been repeated several times since. The cigars are expected to be released in The Netherlands soon, as a limited-edition. Although the coronavirus pandemic may cause some delay in the planning.


The cigars are box-pressed. It’s a 6×56 Toro made at Gran Fabrica Drew Estate. The cigars use a Mexican San Andres wrapper. The binder comes from Connecticut. It’s a Habano binder, harvested using the stalk-cut method. That means that the whole plant is cut at the stalk, instead of leaf by leaf. And then hung upside down to dry. For the fillers, Mata Fina from Brazil is used in combination with Nicaraguan tobacco.


The box-pressed cigar has a rustic, rough-looking wrapper. Dark and oily. The rustic look and the darkness make the cigar look very tasty. The rings are impeccable. Dark blue and gold, all printed in high quality. The cigar feels a little soft though. But box-pressed cigars are made with less tobacco than round cigars, so that’s no surprise. The cigar has a strong aroma of hay.


The cold draw is perfect. The flavor is a mixture of raw tobacco and dusty milk chocolate. Very unusual. Once lit, the cigar has a sour coffee and wood flavor. Slowly pepper and sweetness come into play as well. The sourness fades away and is replaced by soft floral notes. There’s even a hint of milk chocolate. The cigar balances out with coffee, sweetness, and wood. But it is a bit rough in the back of the throat. There is also a flavor best described as old leather. The roughness in the back of the throat fades away. The cigar gets more pepper, wood, and leather. But the sweetness hasn’t disappeared either. The second third starts with leather, pepper, and more milk chocolate. American milk chocolate, which is a world apart from European milk chocolate. The cigar moves to a more woody flavor profile, with some acidity soon after. In the last third, the mouthfeel is dry. There is a distinct nut flavor, with leather, wood, and pepper.


The smoke is superb, as is always the case with Drew Estate. Thick, full, and enough to make the fire brigade drop by. The draw is great. The ash is white and firm. And the burn had to be corrected once or twice. The smoke time of this full-bodied, full-flavored cigar is two hours and fifty minutes

Would I buy this cigar again? Nah, I will stick to the regular Undercrown Maduro

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Categories: 90, Gran Fabrica Drew Estate, Nicaraguan cigars, Undercrown | Tags: , , , , ,

Rauchvergnügen Gran Corona #64cm2

Rauchvergnügen Gran Corona #64cm2 . That 64cm2 is the cubic capacity of this gran corona from the Dominican Republic. The owners and founders of Rauchvergnügen are three German engineers, who combined their passion for engineering and cigars. They launched the brand in 2016, but last year they released their latest creation. A unique ashtray, 3D printed with the structure of a tobacco leaf. Ministry of Cigars wrote about the 42K ashtray before.


As for the cigar, there are several sizes of the Rauchvergnügen. And all have a number as size name. That number is the cubic capacity of that specific cigar. The cubic capacity of a 9¼x47 cigar is 64cm2. Therefore this cigar is named 64cm2. It’s made in the Dominican Republic, at Intercigar S.A. That factory is owned by another Western European. Maurice Koks, originally from The Netherlands, continued the family tradition of making cigars by moving to the Dominican Republic. His ancestors made cigars in The Netherlands. Together with the Rauchvergnügen guys, he blended this cigar with Ecuadorian tobacco as the wrapper. The binder is Dominican. For the filler, three tobaccos were selected, coming from Nicaragua, Dominican Republic, and Pennsylvania, USA.


The Colorado colored wrapper has a lot of thin veins, but that is unavoidable on a cigar this size. But it’s a fine-looking wrapper, slightly oily. The triple cap looks great. The cigar feels evenly filled as well. The aroma is spicy with hay. There are two rings on the cigar. Both blue, with the foot ring as a very thin one. It just says ‘Gran Corona’ with the Rauchvergnügen logo. The main ring is about an inch long. It says on the ring that the cigars are engineered to German standards.


The cold draw is a bit tight, but that could be the length. It’s spicy with a raw tobacco flavor. Once it, the cigar tastes like coffee with some sugar and a bit of spice. The flavor then turns to hay with a sweetness that is comparable to honey. There is a hint of chocolate in the flavors too. The flavors then change again to grass with sweetness and soil. The next change brings leather, more pepper, spice, and even a little cream. The leather and wood are gaining in strength, with more spice and pepper. In the second third, the leather is stronger with a hint of coffee and spice. There’s some sweetness as well. Halfway the cigar gets a walnut flavor as well, with coffee, leather, and spices


The draw is good, and that on a long, relatively thin cigar is a testament of a great roller. The ash is fine, salt and pepper colored. Relatively firm. The smoke is decent, both in thickness and in volume. The burn had to be corrected a few times, and due to the length, the cigar needed a few touch-ups. The cigar is medium-bodied, medium flavored. Smooth, well balanced, with enough evolution to keep it interesting. The smoke time is four and a half hours.

Would I buy this cigar again? I liked it, but the smoke time is too long.

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Categories: 90, Dominican cigars, Intercigar, Rauchvergnugen

Hiram & Solomon Shriner Robusto

Hiram & Solomon Shriner Robusto. One of the seven blends available within the Hiram & Solomon portfolio but the only one without the Freemason logo. The recipe is the same though. Made in Nicaragua, blended by Fouad Kashouty and George Dakrat with the help of David Blanco. And produced at the renowned Plasencia Cigars factory in Esteli. And as true freemasons, Hiram & Solomon donate parts of the proceeds of the cigars to charity. The brand started as a fundraiser. The idea was to create a one-off cigar for an event, but the cigars became so popular that it resulted in one of the fastest-growing family-owned cigar brands on the market nowadays.

The size of the cigar caused some confusion. The sticker on the cellophane mentions 5×52. That is also mentioned in the vitola list on the website, yet, at the pictures of the cigars, another size is mentioned. 5½x50 instead of 5×52. Cigar nerds as we are, we grabbed our Herics cigar measuring tape to see which information is correct. The cigar measures 5×52. The wrapper is Ecuadorian Sumatra. The binder comes from Indonesia, maybe even the real Sumatra but the specifics have not been disclosed. To make this a five-country blend cigar, fillers from Brazil, Dominican Republic, and two tobaccos from Nicaragua were selected.

The Colorado colored wrapper has a water spot. Quite a large one. But that doesn’t matter and it would be unfair to deduct points. Why? Because we have a few more of these that don’t have ugly spots. Cigars are a natural product, and a water spot can happen. It doesn’t alter the flavor, it is just aesthetically not the best look. The ring, compared to the other Hiram & Solomon cigars, this is lacking the Freemason logo. But the sword and the crest probably have a meaning in the Masonic world. The maroon colored ring is decent yet pale in comparison to the other Hiram & Solomon rings. The wrapper is silky without veins and has some tooth. The cigar feels well constructed. The aroma is strong, barnyard, and hay.

The cold draw is fine, with a dry raw tobacco and raisin flavor. Sweetness with spices, coffee, and earthiness are released from the first puff on. With some red pepper. The flavor has hints of straw and hay, but with some sweetness, spice, and earthiness. There is a little cinnamon in the retrohale, with cedar. After an inch, there is a salty flavor, with honey sweetness, hay, and some slight white pepper. After a third, the flavor turns to sweet, young wood with milk chocolate. The cigar keeps giving that slight woody flavor with sweetness, spice, milk chocolate but now with some leather as well. The sweetness turns to marzipan. Add in a little nuttiness, gingerbread spices, and some white pepper and you have the start of the final third. The last few puffs, nut flavors are strong.

The draw is good and the burn is straight. The ash is quite firm even though it’s frayed. The smoke is white, reasonably thick and the volume is good too. It’s a smooth cigar, no rough edges. But at the same time, it’s lacking some character, it’s pretty middle of the road. Perfect for a cup of coffee late morning. The cigar is smooth, medium-bodied, and medium flavored. The smoke time is two hours and forty minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? I will pick the Hiram & Solomon Fellow Craft over this.

Categories: 90, Hiram & Solomon, Nicaraguan cigars, Tabacos de Oriente Nicaragua | Tags: , , , ,

Alec Bradley Orchant Seleccion Twisty

Alec Bradley Orchant Seleccion. For the last few years, the British cigar retailer Cgars Ltd has been creating limited editions under the name Orchant Seleccion. It started in 2007 as a collaboration with Habanos distributor Hunters & Frankau. They approached Orchant with the idea to hand-select boxes of cigars that he thought were outstanding. Then add an ‘Orchant Seleccion’ ring and sell them exclusively through his C. Gars Ltd shop. Up till today, approximately 20 different Cuban cigars are part of the Orchant Seleccion. But all in a limited number of boxes, and gone is gone. But it’s not limited to Cuban cigars anymore.


In the last few years, Orchant found several producers of New World cigars to create a limited edition exclusively for Cgars Ltd and Turmeaus Tobacconist. Davidoff created one. Regius did an Orchant Seleccion, just like Oliva. Alec Bradley did one and last year Drew Estate created three different sizes under the Orchant Seleccion name. Those are the lightweight, middleweight, and heavyweight. But recently the Alec Bradley Orchant Seleccion made a comeback. Not as a rerun of the old version, but the same blend of Nicaraguan and Honduran tobaccos. Yet in three different, smaller, sizes. Including a rare, unique twist on the Culebra. Shorter and thicker than a regular Culebra, and with the name Twisty. The other two sizes are the Orchie and the Pointy. The Twisty is the last of the three cigars that will be reviewed.


The three cigars are intertwined, but not as much as a regular Culebra. That’s impossible because of the length and the thickness of the cigar. The Alec Bradley Orchant Seleccion Twisty is shorter and thicker than any other Culebra on the market. The wrapper is dark and oily. A little rustic too, with some veins and bumps. But the shine makes the cigar look tasty. The cigar feels well constructed. The aroma has hints of hay with some acidity. It’s quite mild.


The cold draw is good. Spicy raw tobacco, a little harsh but in a pleasant way. After lighting there’s an explosion of coffee with some dark chocolate and pepper. The coffee and dark chocolate get accompanied by some marzipan sweetness. There is also a little salt and licorice. At the end of the first third, there is some harshness. Wood, earthiness, dark bitter chocolate, herbs, and pepper are on the palate. There is also a slightly burned flavor, something all three cigars have in common. The final third has the complexity of dark chocolate again. It’s coffee, wood, leather, and pepper. But now with a mild sweetness as well.


The draw is fantastic. And the smoke is thicker and fuller than on the other two Alec Bradley Orchant Seleccion. The burn needed a touch-up or two. The white ash is firm and dense, but flaky. Even though this is the most accessible cigar of the three, it is also the least balanced. But it has character. The cigar is medium-full bodied, full-flavored. The smoke time is one hour and forty-five minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? I want a few as conversational pieces
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Categories: 90, Alec Bradley, Honduran cigars, Raices Cubanas | Tags: , , , ,

Alec Bradley Orchant Seleccion Orchie

Alec Bradley Orchant Seleccion. For the last few years, the British cigar retailer Cgars Ltd has been creating limited editions under the name Orchant Seleccion. It started in 2007 as a collaboration with Habanos distributor Hunters & Frankau. They approached Orchant with the idea to hand-select boxes of cigars that he thought were outstanding. Then add an ‘Orchant Seleccion’ ring and sell them exclusively through his C. Gars Ltd shop. Up till today, approximately 20 different Cuban cigars are part of the Orchant Seleccion. But all in a limited number of boxes, and gone is gone. But it’s not limited to Cuban cigars anymore.


In the last few years, Orchant found several producers of New World cigars to create a limited edition exclusively for Cgars Ltd and Turmeaus Tobacconist. Davidoff created one. Regius did an Orchant Seleccion, just like Oliva. Alec Bradley did one and last year Drew Estate created three different sizes under the Orchant Seleccion name. Those are the lightweight, middleweight, and heavyweight. But recently the Alec Bradley Orchant Seleccion made a comeback. Not as a rerun of the old version, but the same blend of Nicaraguan and Honduran tobaccos. Yet in three different, smaller, sizes. Including a rare, unique twist on the Culebra. Shorter and thicker than a regular Culebra, and with the name Twisty. The other two sizes are the Orchie and the Pointy. The Orchie is the first of the three cigars that will be reviewed.


The Colorado Maduro colored wrapper has a spot on the wrapper. A green spot, which happens when a drop of water hits the leaf while drying. It does not change the flavor of the cigar but it just alters the look. There is one long, thin vein running over the cigar. The wrapper has a leathery look. The smell is amazing, sweet with spices. Cinnamon, nutmeg, allspice. The cigar feels good, evenly packed. The head is well rounded, with a nice triple cap. The ring is dark, with lots of details.


The cold draw is great. The raw tobacco flavor is spicy and strong. The first flavors are charred wood, spice, and leather. The spices include cumin, cloves and more. It’s delicate, subtle yet the cigar quite strong and in your face. There’s also a little sweetness and acidity. After a few puffs, some coffee shows up. Overall the flavors are a bit charred, burned. The flavors remain dark in the second third as well. Wood, soil, coffee. In the final third, there is more pepper, a little salt, and a strong earthiness with some coffee. The pepper grows and there is a hint of very dark chocolate.


The draw is great. There is enough smoke, it is quite thin though. The ash is white with some black smears. The burn is straight as an arrow. The cigar is medium-bodied, medium flavored. In the final third, the cigar becomes stronger, both in body and in flavor. The smoke time is one hour and forty-five minutes

Would I buy this cigar again? Maybe

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Categories: 90, Alec Bradley, Honduran cigars, Raices Cubanas

Herrera Esteli Maduro Toro Especial

Herrera Esteli Maduro Toro Especial. Another blend by master blender Willy Herrera for Drew Estate. This blend was released in 2018, 7 years after his move to the big cigar manufacturer. But he rose to fame as a blender at the small Miami based El Titan de Bronze. That small factory in Little Havana is owned and operated by his in-laws and that’s where Jonathan Drew found Herrera. One of the promises that Drew made was a cigar with the Herrera name, although that did take some time and effort as Frank Herrera, the cigar lawyer, had registered his name and used it for cigars as well.


The Herrera Esteli Maduro is made in Nicaragua, at the Gran Fabrica Drew Estate. For the blend, Herrera took Nicaraguan filler from Drew Estate’s tobacco library. He blended that with a Connecticut Broadleaf binder from the Connecticut River Valley and a Brazilian Mata Fina wrapper. There are five sizes available, but for this review, we decided on the 6×52 Toro Especial.


The cigar has that typical Brazilian Mata Fina wrapper. Dark but kind of rough looking, with a few veins. For a Mata Fina, it’s actually quite smooth, but it’s rougher than the average Maduro. The blue and golden ring with white letters is a copy of the original Herrera Esteli, just in a different color scheme. The cigar feels well rolled. The triple cap is beautiful. And the cigar has a strong aroma. Sweet straw with some charred wood comes to mind.

The cold draw is fine, with a mild yet intense dark chocolate taste. The first flavors are salty wood with a bit of leather. Slowly the cigar develops some leaf flavors as well, and mild chocolate. The expected sweetness from the Brazilian wrapper is lacking though. The mouthfeel is meaty, chewy. After a third, the flavors become more complex. It’s wood and grass, but then with a mix of sugar, pepper, spices, leather, soil, and toast. All those flavors are mild and balanced. Halfway the cigar gets a nice roasted coffee bean flavor with spices, pepper, and leather.


The draw is superb. And the ash is white and dense. The burn is good, not straight as an arrow but no corrections are needed. And the smoke is thick and full, a Drew Estate trademark. The smoke time is two hours and fifteen minutes. This cigar is full-bodied, full-flavored.

Would I buy this cigar again? Yes, I enjoyed it
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Categories: 90, Gran Fabrica Drew Estate, Herrera Esteli, Nicaraguan cigars | Tags: , , , , , ,

Asylum 13 Oblongata

Asylum 13 Medulla Oblongata, a line introduced at the IPCPR 2017 but only introduced to the international markets in 2019. An interesting concept, where two cigars with an identical blend and size are sold but in a different shape. The Medulla is a round cigar. The Oblongata is box-pressed. And the Medulla Oblongata is the part of the brain that controls involuntary reactions. Breathing, coughing, sneezing, hiccups etcetera. And now the brain has to decide which of the two is the best. The round Medulla or the box-pressed Oblongata.


The blend is identical to the Asylum 13 Corojo. It’s an all Honduran cigar with a Corojo wrapper. The only difference is the priming of the tobacco. The Asylum 13 Medulla Oblongata utilizes tobacco from higher priming. By using leaves from the higher of the plant, the flavor profile is different than the original Asylum 13 Corojo. The cigars are rolled in the El Aladino factory in Danli. The factory is owned by Christian Eiroa. Asylum Cigars is a partnership between Eiroa and Tom Lazuka.


Just like the Medulla, the cigar is wrapped in wax paper for ¾ of the cigar. Once removed, the Colorado colored Corojo wrapper is revealed. It does have some veins, but thinner than the ones on the Medulla. The cigar has the right amount of bounce when softly squeezed. And just like the Medulla, the aroma is medium strong. It’s dried wood and stable as well.


The cold draw is a bit tight. And the flavors are pepper, raw tobacco with a minty freshness. The Oblongata starts exactly like the Medulla. Muted, salty, and dusty. With a little bit of nutmeg. The salt remains, some cedar shows up too. But all still muted. There is some leather as well. Slowly the cigar gets more sweetness, more cedar, and some pepper. The cedar is stronger in the retrohale. The second third starts salty, with pepper, green herbs, cedar, and leather. The cigar turns more spicy and salty, with leather, cedar, and earthiness. The flavors remain the same throughout the third part. There seems to be less evolution than in the Medulla.


The draw is better after the cigar is lit. The ash is white and dense. The cigar is smooth, balanced. The burn is beautifully straight. The smoke could be a little thicker though, and bigger in volume. Although it picks up in the last third. This cigar is medium in body and strength. But it’s smooth and balanced throughout the cigar. The smoke time is two hours and fifteen minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? Maybe

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Categories: 90, Asylum, El Aladino, Honduran cigars | Tags: , , , , , ,

La Gloria Cubana Paraiso Edición Regional Caribe

La Gloria Cubana Paraiso Edición Regional Caribe. From the 2014 Regional Edition program but only released in 2015. And released in the countries supplied by Caribbean Cigar Corporation. That includes the Dutch Antilles, Surinam, Jamaica, Honduras, Panama, Bahamas, Caiman Islands and more. The only other Caribe edition is the 2008 Juan Lopez Short Torpedo. The cigars came in boxes of 25, and are extremely hard to find nowadays.


The size is 135 mm or 5⅓ inches in length with a ring gauge of 52. That size is named Edmundo. And that is a size only used for Montecristo when it comes to regular production. But the same vitola has been used for the Montecristo Travel Humidor and a special Montecristo X Edicion Festival de Habano as well. And for several regional editions. Bolivar had three, for Qatar, for the UAE and the Benelux. Diplomatico used it for The Netherlands. Juan Lopez saw this size for the Benelux and Canada. Pacific Cigar Company, the distributor for the Asia Pacific region used the size for La Flor de Cano. And Ramon Allones saw a regional edition for Libanon and a combined edition for Greece and Cyprus. Then there is the 2011 H. Upmann Royal Robusto in this size, a La Casa del Habano exclusive release.

The wrapper is nice oily, but a little rough to look at. It’s not smooth, it’s like there are pimples under the skin. There’s also slight discoloration. It looks like the wrapper above the ring is darker than the wrapper below the ring. The cigar is very soft, with a harder spot under the ring. The ring is the classic La Gloria Cubana ring and the evenly classic Edicion Regional ring. There is a very, very mild aroma. Just a little bit of a wood smell, but very faint.


The cold draw is surprisingly good considering the plug that was felt underneath the ring. The wrapper is quite salty, and the overall flavor in the cold draw is salted peanuts. The first puffs are overly sweet coffee with some dry leather and earthiness. Soon the leather takes over, with sweetness, mild pepper, wood, and earthiness. There is a little salt too. The coffee returns, but as a supporting flavor to the sweet leather. In the second third, there is a harsh bitterness underneath the sweet leather. There’s also pepper and some nutty flavor. The nuts gain strength, with some salt, pepper, and leather. The sweetness disappears around the halfway point. The leather doesn’t give up though and becomes stronger too. The cigar is very flavorful. The mouthfeel is a bit try, and the bitterness is gone. The final third is less balanced, a little harsh and bitter. With wood as the main flavor, supported by soil, coffee, and a lot of pepper. Unfortunately, the bitterness is growing, and that makes the cigar take a turn for the worst


The draw doesn’t have issues. It might even be a bit loose as the cigar is slightly underfilled. The light gray ash is like a stack of dimes. The burn is straight. The smoke is nothing to complain about either. This is a medium-bodied cigar, yet the flavors are strong. Much stronger than any other Cuban that’s been reviewed recently. The smoke time is an hour and a half.

Would I buy this cigar again? Not for the crazy secondary market prices

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Categories: 90, Cuban cigars, La Gloria Cubana (Habanos) | Tags: , , , ,

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