90

La Gloria Cubana Paraiso Edición Regional Caribe

La Gloria Cubana Paraiso Edición Regional Caribe. From the 2014 Regional Edition program but only released in 2015. And released in the countries supplied by Caribbean Cigar Corporation. That includes the Dutch Antilles, Surinam, Jamaica, Honduras, Panama, Bahamas, Caiman Islands and more. The only other Caribe edition is the 2008 Juan Lopez Short Torpedo. The cigars came in boxes of 25, and are extremely hard to find nowadays.


The size is 135 mm or 5⅓ inches in length with a ring gauge of 52. That size is named Edmundo. And that is a size only used for Montecristo when it comes to regular production. But the same vitola has been used for the Montecristo Travel Humidor and a special Montecristo X Edicion Festival de Habano as well. And for several regional editions. Bolivar had three, for Qatar, for the UAE and the Benelux. Diplomatico used it for The Netherlands. Juan Lopez saw this size for the Benelux and Canada. Pacific Cigar Company, the distributor for the Asia Pacific region used the size for La Flor de Cano. And Ramon Allones saw a regional edition for Libanon and a combined edition for Greece and Cyprus. Then there is the 2011 H. Upmann Royal Robusto in this size, a La Casa del Habano exclusive release.

The wrapper is nice oily, but a little rough to look at. It’s not smooth, it’s like there are pimples under the skin. There’s also slight discoloration. It looks like the wrapper above the ring is darker than the wrapper below the ring. The cigar is very soft, with a harder spot under the ring. The ring is the classic La Gloria Cubana ring and the evenly classic Edicion Regional ring. There is a very, very mild aroma. Just a little bit of a wood smell, but very faint.


The cold draw is surprisingly good considering the plug that was felt underneath the ring. The wrapper is quite salty, and the overall flavor in the cold draw is salted peanuts. The first puffs are overly sweet coffee with some dry leather and earthiness. Soon the leather takes over, with sweetness, mild pepper, wood, and earthiness. There is a little salt too. The coffee returns, but as a supporting flavor to the sweet leather. In the second third, there is a harsh bitterness underneath the sweet leather. There’s also pepper and some nutty flavor. The nuts gain strength, with some salt, pepper, and leather. The sweetness disappears around the halfway point. The leather doesn’t give up though and becomes stronger too. The cigar is very flavorful. The mouthfeel is a bit try, and the bitterness is gone. The final third is less balanced, a little harsh and bitter. With wood as the main flavor, supported by soil, coffee, and a lot of pepper. Unfortunately, the bitterness is growing, and that makes the cigar take a turn for the worst


The draw doesn’t have issues. It might even be a bit loose as the cigar is slightly underfilled. The light gray ash is like a stack of dimes. The burn is straight. The smoke is nothing to complain about either. This is a medium-bodied cigar, yet the flavors are strong. Much stronger than any other Cuban that’s been reviewed recently. The smoke time is an hour and a half.

Would I buy this cigar again? Not for the crazy secondary market prices

number90

Categories: 90, Cuban cigars, La Gloria Cubana (Habanos) | Tags: , , , ,

Brick House Year of the Rat

Brick House Year of the Rat. J.C. Newman is one of the companies that entered the Chinese Zodiac cigar game with the Brick House brand. But unlike the other brands, Brick House is not using a red-colored box or red-colored rings. In fact, except for the size and the flag tail, you can’t tell the difference between a regular production Brick House or this limited edition. Unless you see the beautiful black box with the painting of the rat and the limited-edition text.


We were unable to find any information about this cigar online, so we suspect that the blend is the exact same as the Brick House Classic. And a classic is. An old brand that was discontinued during the Great Depression. But it has been resurrected by Eric and Bobby Newman about a decade ago. This time as a Nicaraguan cigar, with Nicaraguan fillers and binder. The wrapper comes from Ecuador. And this 6¼x52 toro with the flag tail isn’t a regular production size.


The cigar feels silky. The evenly colored Colorado wrapper is smooth and almost veinless. The nice cap, a flag tail, sets the cigar apart from regular production Brick House cigars. Since there is no secondary ring for the year of the rat, the flag tail is the only sign this is a special release. The Brick House ring is a nicely shaped ring with yellow, red, black and gold color schemes. Classic and stylish. The cigar feels well constructed. The wood aroma is strong.


The cold draw is strong. Just as the flavors of raisin, raw tobacco, and pepper. Once lit the mouthfeel is thick. Hints of dark chocolate, leather, wood, soil, and coffee, all with a bit of pepper. It’s a bit hard to keep the cigar lit in the beginning. But once that problem is solved, the cigar releases sweetness with the bitterness of dark chocolate, and some dry wood flavors. Slowly the flavors become more woody with green herbs, pepper, licorice, and some sweetness. After creating more airflow, the flavors are more chocolate, more pepper, and a bit of salt. All with a creamy mouthfeel. Halfway there is coffee with chocolate, spices, pepper and a hint of citrus. The finale is wood, pepper, green herbs, and leather.


The draw is decent, not the best draw but also not bad enough to complain. The smoke is thick and full. Especially after creating a little bit more of a draw using the cigar redeemer tool. The burn is good. The smoke time of this cigar is exactly three hours. This is a medium-full bodied, medium-full flavored cigar.

Would I buy this cigar again? If it’s priced within the same range as the regular production Brick House, yes.

number90

Categories: 90, Brick House, Nicaraguan cigars, PENSA | Tags: , , , , ,

Jas Sum Kral Tyrannical Buc Generosos Connecticut

Jas Sum Kral Tyrannical Buc Generosos Connecticut. This is one of the Tyrannical Buc blends that Jas Sum Kral released in 2019. The first announcement was just the name and the logo. More details surfaced later. And the cigar is slowly making it’s way to the international markets. The Jas Sum Kral distributors in Sweden and Malaysia have ordered and received the Tyrannical Buc. The cigar got a lot of praise from people within the Habanos scene. The Cuban cigars oriented Friends of Habanos called this the best cigar smoked in 2019.


The Jas Sum Kral Tyrannical Buc is available in four vitolas. And with two different wrappers. Either a Connecticut Shade wrapper from Ecuador or a Connecticut Broadleaf wrapper. The binder and fillers are the same for both blends. A Nicaraguan binder from Jalapa, with fillers from Nicaragua and Pennsylvania USA. The sizes available are a 4×48 Magnum 48, a 6½x50 Dobles, a 5½x60 Golum and this 5½x40 Generosos. For this review, we selected the Connecticut Shade blend. The cigars are made at Tabacalera Aragon, the factory in which Jas Sum Kral has a stake.

The cigar looks alright. The wrapper is quite dark for a Connecticut Shade. The ring is simple, a little too simple to our taste. Just a white ring with a drawing of a T-Rex. Now the detail is nice. Jas Sum Kral means I am king, and the t-rex is wearing a crown. But the other Jas Sum Kral rings are so detailed and gorgeous, that this ring seems bare. Maybe a different color would help. The cigar feels well constructed, not underfilled nor hard. The mild aroma has a reminiscence of hay and grass.


The cold draw is a little tight. The aroma in the cold draw is slightly sweet, yet spicy, tobacco. After lighting there’s coffee, honey sweetness, and a little spice. The flavors lack the classic Connecticut Shade mustiness, which is positive. Slowly some leather shows up. The honey keeps lingering around, with a grassy and dried leaves flavor. There’s also a little salt while slowly some oak shows up as well. The mild pepper is a constant in this cigar’s flavor profile. The final third is more of the same. Pepper, wood, a little grass, and herbs.


The draw is a bit tight. But the light-colored ash is amazing. Dense, firm, and beautiful. Even with the tight draw, the smoke is decent. Enough in thickness and volume, but with a better draw the smoke would have been better too. The burn is razor-sharp. The cigar is medium-full flavored and bodied. The smoke time is two hours and fifteen minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? I would not mind smoking a few more.

number90

Categories: 90, Jas Sum Kral, Nicaraguan cigars, Tabacalera Aragon | Tags: , , , ,

Camacho Ecuador Robusto

Camacho Ecuador Robusto. In 2008, Oettinger Davidoff acquired the Camacho brand, farms, and factory from the Eiroa family. And while Davidoff continued with the exciting Camacho blends for the first years, behind the scenes they were ready for a relaunch. In 2013, that relaunch hit the markets. Under the ‘Bold’ name, Davidoff reblended some of the Camacho lines and introduced stunning new packaging. A few new blends were added. The big gamble paid off and a year later a new line edition was added. That’s the Camacho Ecuador.


The Camacho Ecuador is made with Corojo, Criollo Ligero and Pelo de Oro from Honduras and the Dominican Republic as filler. It’s being held together with a Brazilian Mata Fina binder. And finally, an Ecuadorian Habano wrapper finishes the cigar. It comes in several sizes, but for this review, I smoked the 5×50 Robusto. While the Camacho factory was called Rancho Jamastran when it was owned by the Eiroa family, Davidoff changed the factory to Agroindustras Laepe, S.A. In 2016, a brand new factory was opened, designed by the Honduran architect Gonzalo Nunez Dias.

The cigar looks great. A nice, oily, dark wrapper. A perfectly shaped head. And that iconic label, copied by several other brands including Toraño. The black scorpion, the logo of the Camacho Bold series, is prominently visible on the ring. The construction feels good, it seems like and evenly packed cigar. The cigar has a nice leather aroma to it, medium strong.


The cold draw is great, perfect resistance. The flavor is a dry wood and tobacco flavor, with some spice in the aftertaste. After lighting, the first flavors are salt, coffee, pepper. It evolves to marzipan sweetness with leather, wood, soil, and toast with a peppery aftertaste. The wood, which is classic cedar, combines perfectly with the sweetness. But there is a little roughness in the flavors, it’s not well rounded. The sweetness and cedar remain the main flavors, with some spices, pepper, and dry leather. After a third, the cigar gets darker in flavors. The cedar turns to oak, there is more pepper. The flavors are better-rounded now. Halfway some toast shows up as well. In the last part, it’s mainly oak, with pepper, hay, some leather, and pepper.


The draw is very good. The ash is light-colored, dense and firm. A good volume of white smoke. The burn is pretty straight. But the flavors, although nice, aren’t well rounded. This is a medium to full-bodied cigar, medium flavored. The smoke time is two hours and fifteen minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? Maybe

number90

Categories: 90, Agroindustria LAEPE S.A, Camacho, Honduran cigars | Tags: , , ,

Steenbok Robusto

Steenbok Robusto. This Honduran puro is a Dutch cigar brand, made at Compania Hondurena de Tabacos in El Paraiso, Honduras. That’s where brands such as Kuuts, Miro, Placeres, and Zapata are made as well. The brand is founded by two cigar aficionados, Johan Loomans and Brigitte Altena, from The Netherlands. The brand was released in 2018. The packaging of the cigars is cool, silver tins containing either the robusto, mini-robusto, or the half corona. The cigars are for sale in The Netherlands only for now.


The blend is made of all Honduran tobacco and with that, it’s one of the few Honduran puros on the market in The Netherlands. The robusto measures 5×50, the classic robusto size. Steenbok Cigars handed us this sample at the Intertabac trade show in Dortmund, Germany last September.


The ring is huge and white. But what makes it stand out is that the brand isn’t printed. The letters are cut out so the wrapper is forming the name of the cigar. Handmade in Honduras is printed though, but in a color very close to the wrapper. The wrapper is bumpy with a few veins. And right over the ring, there is some discoloration due to water drops during fermentation. The construction feels good though. The burned wood aroma is quite strong.


The cold draw is great with a mild coffee and strong tobacco flavor. Once lit, the cigar produces a sweet coffee flavor. Some grassy flavors show up and match the coffee in strength. There’s also a little bit of leather and some pepper. The cigar has quite some sweetness too, and a bit of a dusty aftertaste that is typical for Connecticut Shade. But this cigar doesn’t have a Connecticut Shade wrapper so its a question where that comes from. There’s also a little nuttiness. The flavors also get some wood and herbs. But it’s all mild and sweet. The cigar is not unpleasant but lacks character. After a third, the cigar turns very creamy, with vanilla and some more pepper. And now the cigar is getting more interesting. After two thirds, the flavors are creamy, buttery with wood and pepper. The finale brings a lot of pepper, what a difference from the start


The draw is great, and the cigar produces a good amount of smoke. The burn is great. The ash is firm but dark. The cigar is smooth and balanced. Medium-bodied at best, medium flavored. The start lacks character but the cigar gains traction halfway. The smoke time is two hours and twenty minutes

Would I buy this cigar again? Yes, it’s a nice smooth medium cigar for a very nice price
number90

Categories: 90, Honduran cigars, Steenbok | Tags: , ,

Joya de Nicaragua Numero Uno L’Ambassadeur

Joya de Nicaragua Numero Uno L’Ambassadeur. That is a long name for a unique cigar. You can call it the Nicaraguan Cohiba or Trinidad, as the history shares some resemblance. All three were diplomatic gifts before being released commercially years later. The Joya de Nicaragua Numero Uno was released this year, after surfacing as an event only cigar last year. The production is limited to 1500 boxes a year, and only one size is available. That’s this Lonsdale called L’Ambassadeur, which is a reference to the diplomatic history of this cigar.


In the past, the Nicaraguan government used another Joya de Nicaragua cigar as the official gift. That was the Antaño 1970, a strong cigar. With the Numero Uno, they went for a milder cigar. The Connecticut Shade wrapper from Ecuador is much milder tobacco than the strong wrapper and blend from the Antaño. The filler and binder tobaccos are all from Nicaragua.

The pale wrapper looks decent. There is some shine from the oil, thin veins. It’s just a typical thin and brittle Connecticut Shade wrapper. The blue from the big cigar ring pops, it’s a nice contrast from the pale yellowish-brown wrapper. The cigar has a triple cap with a little pigtail. The construction feels good, with the right amount of bounce. The aroma is medium in strength. It has that grassy hay aroma that you can expect from Connecticut Shade wrappers.


The cold draw is fine. It gives a lot of flavor, raw tobacco and raisins. After lighting it’s earthy, coffee, pepper, nutmeg, and a little muted sweetness. Then some slightly harsh grass flavor shows up too, with a hint of milk chocolate. The classic Connecticut Shade mustiness isn’t as strong as in most Connecticut Shade cigars, but it is there, looming on the background. The flavors then evolve to soil, leather, citrus, pepper, and salt. The mouthfeel is a bit creamy. The cigar turns grassy again, with cedar. The mustiness is no longer lingering on the background. Halfway the cigar is creamy with old leather, licorice, and sweetness. And for a while, there is a black licorice flavor. After two thirds, it’s the old leather with spices, pepper, cedar, and that typical Connecticut mustiness. In the final part, the cigar is creamy with toast, cedar, sweetness, and pepper.


The draw is fantastic. And since thinner ring cigars are harder to roll than the ticker cigars, a compliment to the rollers is well deserved. The ash is white. And the smoke is decent, both in thickness and volume. The burn is good. This cigar is mild to medium-bodied, medium flavored. The smoke time is three hours.

Would I buy this cigar again? No, it’s not suitable for my palate.

number90

Categories: 90, Fabrica de Tabacos Joya de Nicaragua, Joya de Nicaragua, Nicaraguan cigars | Tags: , , , ,

Siempre Sun Grown Toro

Siempre Sun Grown Toro. Earlier this year, I was approached by one of our contacts who’s working for a European cigar distributor. His question was if I ever heard of Dapper Cigar Company. And honestly, the answer was no. So I googled them, and the brand sparked my interest. They provide a lot of information about the blends on their website. As cigar media, that’s something we love. That cigar distributor decided not to take on Dapper Cigar Company. But another distributor in The Netherlands did, Kelch Trading introduced Dapper Cigars on the Dutch market.


The Siempre Sun Grown Toro sports a Sun Grown Sumatra wrapper from Ecuador. The binder is Connecticut Broadleaf from the United States. The filler comes from Honduras and three regions of Nicaragua. Those are Ometepe, Jalapa, and Esteli. On the website, Dapper Cigar Company even discloses the growers of the wrappers and some of the farms where the wrappers are grown. That kind of information is often hard to, or impossible, to find. The Siempre Sun Grown line was introduced in 2016.


The cigar looks great. The toothy wrapper is dark and oily. The triple cap is flawless. And the orange and gold ring just pops from that dark background. The cigar feels well constructed, we couldn’t find any plugs or soft spots on the touch. The aroma of the cigar is like charred wood and farmyard.


The cold draw is great. The flavors are meaty and earthy before the cigar is lit, with pepper on the tongue. Once lit, the cigar is earthy, spicy, and sweet. Add in some coffee, and that’s the flavor profile in the first puffs. The earthiness and pepper are the main flavors. And the flavors are meaty in mouthfeel. Slowly some spices and dry wood show up too. The pepper mellows out a little bit. Then suddenly it’s espresso with pepper and some citrus acidity. The pepper gets a bit stronger after a third, with a thick, creamy mouthfeel. There’s pepper, spices, wood, coffee, and earthiness. The pepper has a little bite every now and then. After two thirds, a leathery, peppery, cocoa flavor shows up as well. The cigar picks up in strength, power, and pepper. Then the coffee flavor returns as well.


The draw is good. The ash is a little dark though. The burn was alright, although it needed a touch up now and then. The smoke is medium thick and full. This cigar is balanced, although sometimes the pepper has a little bite. The cigar is medium to medium-full bodied and flavored. The smoke time is three hours

Would I buy this cigar again? Yes I liked it. It matched my profile.

number90

Categories: 90, Dapper Cigars, Nicaraguan cigars | Tags: , , , ,

Montecristo Tubos 2003

Montecristo Tubos 2003. This is a gift from a collector and trader of Cuban cigars. The man is a friend of Ministry of Cigars, and he donated a few aged and vintage cigars for us to review. This particular cigar was made in 2003 and comes from the collection of a Greek collector, who has a very well designed aging system for his cigars.

Montecristo was founded in 1935 when Alonso Menendez bought the Particulares Factory and the two brands they made: Particulares and Byron. Then he changed the name into Montecristo. Menendez’s favorite book was The Count of Monte Cristo by Alexandre Dumas. Later on, he bought the H. Upmann factory. And that gave birth to Hunters & Frankau, the exclusive Habanos distributor in the UK. Hunters were the exclusive distributor for Montecristo, Frankau had the rights to H. Upmann. They merged and are still active today. The Corona Grande in the tubos was released somewhere in the 1970s and is still in production today.

The cigar looks good. Colorado Claro in color, no veins that make it unappealing. The wrapper is soft like velvet. The ring is simple, classic. Just a small brown ring with the white Montecristo logo. The aroma is amazing. Strong, cocoa and hay but mainly cocoa.


The cold draw is a bit tight. 2003 is a year where the tobacco wasn’t rushed through fermentation yet, but it was at the end of a period where a lot of new rollers were hired. And with new, unexperienced rollers and not enough quality control, the early 2000s are notorious for having a bad draw. The cold draw has a mild leathery and strong hay flavor. From the moment the cigar is lit, the flavors are soil and coffee with a hint of marzipan sweetness. After a few puffs, leather shows up. A centimeter in, the cigar tastes like leather with chocolate. There’s still some of the marzipan sweetness lingering around in the aftertaste. The cigar than turns to leather with toast and some salt. The flavors are mild, smooth and mild. This is a great morning cigar after a light breakfast. Halfway there’s a strong hazelnut flavor, with toast, leather, pepper, and green herbs. There’s chocolate too. The final third has pepper, wood, leather, toast, and nuts. It’s still smooth but the flavors are much stronger than in the beginning.


The draw is a bit on the tight side, but still acceptable. The ash is light gray and quite dense. But not firm at all, it breaks off easily. The smoke is thick for a Cuban cigar. And white. The burn is very straight. This is a medium-bodied, medium flavored cigar. It starts out mild but grows to medium-full flavored. The smoke time is one hour and fifty minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? With 16 years of age? I would love to.

number90

Categories: 90, Cuban cigars, Montecristo (Habanos) | Tags: , , , , ,

CAO Nicaragua Tipitata

CAO Nicaragua Tipitata. CAO started with country-inspired blends before the company founder Cano Ozgener sold the brand to tobacco giant Scandinavian Tobacco Group. And STG is the parent of General Cigars, so CAO is now part of that family. When STG moved CAO from Tennessee to their headquarters in Virginia, some of the staff refused to move and started Crowned Heads. That’s when Rick Rodriguez was promoted by General Cigars to be the blender and face of the CAO brand. And he continued with the country inspired series.

Most cigar smokers have seen, heard about the CAO Brazil, CAO America, CAO Colombia and the CAO Italia. And probably smoked a fair amount as they are very popular. So for the next of the CAO country-inspired blends, Rodriguez went back to the CAO roots: CAO Nicaragua. The cigar utilizes Nicaraguan tobacco from different regions in the filler and binder. But it’s not a Nicaraguan puro. The blend worked better with a wrapper from Jamastran, Honduras. Jamastran borders the Jalapa valley, it’s just on the Honduran side of the border.

The colorado colored wrapper has a nice shine. But it also has some veins. The cigar feels well constructed. The cap is decent. The ring is in accordance to the country inspired series. The same shape, with Nicaraguan blue and white. The details and letters are in gold, with a red CAO logo. The consistency of the rings in the series is good. The aroma is strong. Cedar, barnyard, sheep and hay is what comes to mind.

The cold draw is flawless. Peppery raisins are the flavor that is released from the cold draw. The start is classic. Coffee, leather, some cinnamon-like spices, and pepper. Basic, yet well balanced and nice. This is not a front-loaded cigar that blows you away from the start. Then the flavors change to more of dry leaves, mushroom flavor with leather and grass. There’s also some sweetness, and after a centimeter, there is a cedar flavor as well. The flavors are a bit dusty and musty though. All of a sudden the cigar has a mild gingerbread flavor with more sweetness and some citrus. Halfway I taste some vanilla with cedar and spices. The final third has a minty fresh aftertaste. And nuts, with cedar and pepper.

The ash is white, dense and firm. The smoke is decent in volume and thickness. The draw is great. The burn is straight. This cigar is medium-bodied and medium flavored. The smoke time is two hours and fifteen minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? Nah
number90

Categories: 90, CAO, Nicaraguan cigars, STG Nicaragua | Tags: , , ,

Kafie 1901 Sumatra Robusto

Kafie 1901 Sumatra Robusto. The Kafie 1901 brand was founded by Dr. Gaby Kafie. Dr. Kafie’s roots are lay in Honduras, where he was born. His ancestors moved to Latin America from Europe in 1901, that’s why 1901 is prominent in the name. Dr. Gaby Kafie moved to the United States and became a physician. Yet, his Honduran roots, the family history in tobacco and his love for cigars and coffee brought him back to Honduras. He started his Tabacalera, Tabacalera Kafie. That factory now includes a cellophane making facility, cigar production, and a box factory. It’s Dr. Kafie’s mission to keep the cigar culture and tradition alive in Honduras. With a decreasing number of factories remaining, that’s an important reason for him to promote Honduran cigars worldwide.

In 2015, the brand released the third Kafie 1901 line. That is the Kafie 1901 Sumatra. It followed the Kafie 1901 Don Fernando Maduro and the Kafie 1901 Connecticut. The cigar is made with Nicaraguan and Dominican filler. The binder is grown locally, in Honduras by the Reyes family. The wrapper is Sumatra, but not from the Indonesian island with the same name. Even though the tobacco originated in South East Asia, seeds were brought to Ecuador. And that’s why there’s so many Ecuadorian Sumatra on the market. From the four sizes available,


The cigar is good looking. A Colorado colored wrapper with a thin vein. It feels like velvet. The head is perfect, beautiful round and nice. The burgundy and gold ring is classic and clear. The name is clear, which blend is clear, the ring gives you the information you need. The cigar has a medium-strong aroma. Its a mixture of hay with the inside of a barn after the animals left to graze outside.

The cold draw is great with a spicy raw tobacco flavor. Once lit, the cigar overpowers with strong coffee and spice. There’s slight citrus on the background and in the aftertaste. After a centimeter, the flavors change. The citrus, spice, and pepper remain. The coffee mellows out and is replaced with leather. And there’s a hint of sweetness. Slowly some salt comes in play as well. Halfway the cigar changes to wood with salt, pepper, and licorice. It’s a sudden change. A few puffs later, a little cocoa shows up on the background. After two thirds, the coffee is back. With spice, pepper, and sweetness. The chocolate, wood, and leather are gone. In the final third, the cigar gets a little more pepper but also a slight harshness that doesn’t do the cigar any good.


The draw is fantastic. And the smoke is white and thick. The light-colored ash is nice and firm. This cigar is full-flavored. The body is medium to medium-full. The smoke time is one hour and twenty minutes

Would I buy this cigar again? A fiver would be nice

number90

Categories: 90, Honduran cigars, Kafie, Tabacalera La Union | Tags: , , ,

Blog at WordPress.com.