91

Bolivar Libertador Edición Francia

Bolivar Libertador Edición Francia. This cigar is released three times. First in 2006 as an edicion regional for France. A year later, another batch was released, also for the French market. This particular cigar hails from the second release. Those releases came in boxes of 10 or dress boxes of 25. The cigar that we smoke for this review comes from a dress box of 25. In 2013, the cigar returned as a semi-regular production but exclusively for the La Casa del Habano franchise stores. The La Casa del Habano version only comes in ten-count boxes though.

I was gifted this beautiful, fat cigar by a friend. We were smoking a cigar pairing it with Cohiba cognac by Martell at his beautiful home. He brought out a box of these beauties and said “why don’t you do a review of these”. A task we happily accepted. The 6½x54 Sublimes has a reputation, and we had never smoked one. So to be able to review a vintage version is an opportunity we could not pass.

The cigar looks good. A nice, evenly colored wrapper. Just one vein. But the wrapper looks dry. Not dry as in no moisture, but dry as in not oily. The triple cap is beautiful. The regular Bolivar ring, with the gold, yellow and brown looks good on the shade of the wrapper. As with most Cuban rings, the exclusivo ring and the regular ring don’t really match. The cigar feels quite hard. There isn’t a lot of aromas left after thirteen years of aging.

The cold draw is good. Lightly salty with a little bit of black pepper. Once lit, the salt and pepper are hardly noticeable. The cigar has a nice honey sweetness with leather. The flavor then turns to dry leather, sweetness, and cedar. Mellow and smooth, this cigar tells you it’s aged. The second third starts with a pronounced coffee flavor, with spices, leather, cedar, and honey. The flavors gain strength as well. The mouthfeel gets dry with coffee, earth, honey, and leather. The same flavors keep lingering around, one stronger than the other and then switching. The honey remains pronounced. Coffee keeps coming back, with leather. In the final third, the earthiness is getting stronger with some more spice and pepper. It has that typical flavor of an aged Cuban cigar that cannot be found in any other cigar in the world.

The draw is good. The light gray ash is pretty and quite firm. The flavors of the cigar are smooth and balanced. In the first third, it’s clear that this is an aged cigar. The cigar starts to show character in the second third, before that it was mellow at best. The smoke is now nice and thick. White and a good volume of smoke as well. This cigar starts mild and grows to medium-full. Both in flavor and strength. The smoke time is three hours and fifteen minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? Boxes with this age are impossible to find.

Categories: 91, Bolivar (Habanos), Cuban cigars, Partagas Factory | Tags: , , , , , , , ,

Muestra de Tabac Pennsylvania Connecticut Figurado

Muestra de Tabac Pennsylvania Connecticut Figurado. Earlier this year, Ministry of Cigars published a review of the Muestra de Tabac Brazilian Mata Fina & Sumatra. A thick perfecto with two wrappers. Not in a barberpole style, but half and half. The cigar is open at both sides, for the smoker to decide which side to smoke first. A patent-pending concept by Patrick Potter & Joey Febre from Tabac Trading Company. But it’s not the only blend using this concept. There are two more.

The blend we are reviewing today is the Pennsylvania & Connecticut Figurado. With on one side Pennsylvania Broadleaf. The other side is wrapped in Connecticut Shade. The filler and binder are Nicaraguan. This 5½x64 thick cigar. Patrick Potter is responsible for blending the cigar. It’s made at Tabacalera La Perla, a small Tabacalera in Esteli, Nicaragua.

Looking at the cigar, we are pleased that the Pennsylvania wrapped part of the cigar is a bit longer than the Connecticut Shade side. The comments on the ring remain the same. We love the idea that the ring can be read from both sides. Yet the idea could have been designed a little better. The Pennsylvania broadleaf looks manly and rough like broadleaf is supposed to look. It makes the Connecticut shade look even paler than it is. The shape is nice. The cigar feels good. No soft ends as with the Brazilian Mata Fina & Sumatra we reviewed before. The aroma is strong. A lot of spice, hay, soil, and barnyard.

The cold draw is fantastic. It delivers spice and pepper with a lot of hay. Immediately after lighting its spice, pepper, and soil that hits the palate. The classic Connecticut Shade mustiness is there, but faint and muted. Sweetness and dark chocolate bitterness replace the spice and pepper. The earthy flavor remains, but now with leather. The complexity and bitterness of the dark chocolate are delicious. There is still pepper on the top of the palate. Black pepper, and it’s growing in strength. The cigar loses some of the dark chocolate and turns more to hay with pepper in the final stages of the first third. The second third starts with that dark chocolate again, with pepper, leather, and wood. Once the cigar reaches the Pennsylvania wrapper, there is more black pepper. The flavors get a little rougher, yet also a little creamy. The intense dark chocolate flavor is a winner. A strong spice shows up too, almost like gingerbread. There’s also a faint hint of vanilla. The vanilla and cream disappear. Spices, pepper, leather, wood is what the cigar gives. With some salt in the finale.

The draw is fantastic. The burn is great too. The cigar produces plenty of smoke, although it’s a bit thin. The light-colored ash is fine. The cigar is balanced, the dark chocolate bitterness makes it complex and intense. This is a full-bodied, medium-full flavored cigar. The smoke time is three hours and fifteen minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? I want more!

Categories: 91, Muestra de Tabac | Tags: , , , ,

Davidoff Puro d’Oro Eminentes

Davidoff Puro d’Oro Eminentes. The eminent is the toro in the line up of the Davidoff Puro d’Oro line. The line was introduced in 2010, with the Eminentes as a line addition in 2011. This particular cigar is a well-aged cigar from the personal collection of the Managing Director UK for Davidoff Distributors U.K. For some reason, the golden Davidoff ring is missing except for the foot ring. According to the Managing Director UK, this cigar is from 2009, making it a pre-release. And that could be the reason for the missing ring.

The cigar is slightly larger and thicker than a regular 6×50 toro. It measures 6¼x52. And it’s one of the Dominican puros from Davidoff. All the tobacco in the cigar is aged for a minimum of five years. And the wrapper, hailing from Yamasa, is developed by no other than Henke Kelner himself.

The cigar looks good. It looks better with just the foot ring in extremely glossy gold color. The embossing on the ring gives the ring more grandeur. The Colorado colored wrapper is smooth, oily, and silky. The little pigtail is a nice touch. The construction feels great. A mild yet spicy aroma finishes the pre-light experience

The cold draw is easy. The cold draw gives a spicy wood and soil flavor. Once lit, it’s all about strong black coffee. Coffee, coffee, and coffee. Slowly some soil and charred wood join the coffee. The flavors are dark yet very pleasant. A faint nut flavor shows up as well, with some spices. Slowly some sweetness shows up too with faint leather. But the coffee never disappears completely. The coffee remains the base flavor, but now with a little more spice, some grass, earthiness, and leather. Halfway the flavors turn. The coffee mellows down, wood becomes more dominant with some sweetness, white pepper, and spices. The final third is more wood, with still some coffee, and an increasing dose of pepper.

The draw is great. The smoke is thick and full, and plenty in volume. The burn is slow and straight with firm white ash. This is indeed a full-bodied cigar from Davidoff, full-flavored as well. Even though the cigar packs a punch, it never gets mean. The balance is fantastic. The smoke time is four hours.

Would I buy this cigar again? Yes. This is a Davidoff I truly enjoyed.

Categories: 91, Cigars Davidoff, Davidoff, Dominican cigars | Tags: , , , ,

Casdagli Traditional Grand Cafe

Casdagli Traditional Grand Cafe. This is the first Casdagli cigar to be made in the Dominican Republic. It was released in 2012 under the name Bespoke. Bespoke started with custom rolled Cuban cigars. Then moved to Costa Rica and the company started to gain traction. The Grand Cafe name is a tribute to Bespoke’s first customer, the Grand Cafe in Minsk, Belarus. More on the Bespoke/Casdagli cigar history can be found here.

Two years ago, Bespoke was renamed to Casdagli Cigars. But the blend didn’t change. In a Zoom chat with Jeremy Casdagli and a group of cigar enthusiasts from New Zealand, Canteros.nz, Casdagli’s distributor, offered to sponsor some cigars for reviews. The package arrived soon after and included these Casdagli Traditional Grand Cafe. The cigars are made with Brazilian Cubra as a wrapper. A binder from the Dominican Republic. And filler from Peru, Nicaragua, and the Dominican. It measures 7½x39.

The cigar is a looker. Slender and long. Colorado to Colorado Maduro in color. Oily wrapper. Closed foot and a pigtail. With a classy, traditional-looking ring. Green and gold with a vintage picture in the center. The construction feels good. The cigar has a strong aroma. Classic barnyard, manure, earthy aromas.

The cold draw is surprisingly good. Even with a closed foot, the draw is great. It leaves a mildly spicy, peppery flavor on the lips. Straight from the start, there is a strong yet sweet coffee flavor. With strong, we don’t mean espresso, but full flavor. It then turns more towards wood flavors, with a little spice. Not pepper, but spice. Yet there is still some coffee on the background. The flavors slowly evolve into earthy, leathery wood, with cumin. But the flavors are rounded, well balanced, and smooth. The second third has a classic mixture of wood, earthiness, leather, coffee with some sweetness. There is a little vanilla. All flavors are brought together by some citrus. The mouthfeel is creamy. The final third leans more towards leather and wood, but with a creamy mouthfeel. Suddenly there is a slight chocolate flavor as well.

The draw is amazing, just like the copious amounts of smoke the cigar produces. The burn is beautiful. The ash is salt and pepper colored, but it’s not too firm. This cigar is balanced, smooth, well rounded. Elegant in both size and flavors. Traditional, not a powerhouse heavy in ligero. This is a cigar that would fit into every past decade without being outdated of old-fashioned. It’s medium-bodied, medium flavored. The smoke time is two hours and thirty minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? Yes I will

Categories: 91, Bespoke, Dominican cigars, KBF | Tags: , , ,

The Circus Maduro Lancero

The Circus Maduro Lancero. Late last year, Daniel Guerrero from El Viejo Continente announced the release of a lancero in The Circus line. A Maduro lancero with a Mexican San Andres Maduro wrapper over Nicaraguan binder and filler tobaccos from Ometepe and Jalapa. But information on that cigar is hard to find. There is no mention on the website of American Caribbean Cigars, the website of the factory. Nor on the website of El Viejo Continente, which could use an update in our opinion anyway. Both websites offer little to none information on the blends, availability, news, reviews, or any other information that can be useful. We feel that a better website and better accessible information would really help the brand.

The cigars are made at American Caribbean Cigars, a factory once almost acquired by Gurkha Cigars. The series is a tribute to all the people that worked with master blender Daniel Guerrero during the creation of this cigar. It took Guerrero and his people four years to make the blend. The first four sizes were named with the team in mind. The Magician represents the ingenuity of the team where the Harlequin is the fact of always wanting to make it. The Twister stands for the knowledge and the know-how of the blenders. And the Canon is the final shot, an explosion of flavors. The lancero is not part of the original release vitolas.

The cigar looks good. The Maduro wrapper is almost black. It’s oily with a few thin, sharp veins. The red foot band and the red with gold label are a beautiful contrast with the darkness of the wrapper. A nice pigtail finishes the look. The ring has a picture of a circus tent to keep the theme alive. The cigar feels well made. The aroma has a reminiscence of hay and is quite strong.

No complaints about the cold draw. It’s good, with a gingerbread flavor. After lighting there is some coffee, but most striking is the buttercream flavor. Old fashioned buttercream with a hint of vanilla. Although the vanilla only shows up in the retrohale. The sweetness of the Maduro wrapper shines through in this blend, but there is also a hint of white pepper. Slowly a grassy flavor shows up too, with some citrus. The earthiness and dark chocolate show up too, with leather, while the buttercream and vanilla fade. Slowly a dried leaf flavor shows up too while the grass is gone. After a third, the mouthfeel is thick and oily. The cigar now moves into a flavor profile of dark wood, forest soil, and leather with some black pepper. The cigar gets more earthy with coffee. Near the end, the cigar has some chocolate, coffee, wood, and spices.

The draw is great. The smoke is full and thick. The light gray ash isn’t very firm though and breaks easily. The burn is straight. The flavors are balanced. This is a medium-bodied and medium flavored cigar, balanced, with evolution. The smoke time is three hours. It could have lasted longer, but the cigar turned bitter.

Would I buy this cigar again? I enjoyed it a lot, so yes


Categories: 91, American Caribbean Tobacco S.A., Cigars by brand, Nicaraguan cigars, The Circus | Tags: , , , ,

Joya de Nicaragua Antano CT Robusto

Joya de Nicaragua Antano CT Robusto. In the United States, Joya de Nicaragua used to be known for the strong, bold cigars. Especially the Joya de Nicaragua Antaño lines carried that stigma. Both the Antaño and the Antaño Dark Corojo are on the fuller side of the spectrum. In Europe, Joya de Nicaragua made a name for itself with the milder Clasico line. But in the last few years, Joya de Nicaragua is releasing medium strong and mild cigars with the Joya Red, Silver, Black, and the Uno. And since last year, there is even a Connecticut Shade wrapped Joya de Nicaragua Antaño. The Joya de Nicaragua Antaño CT series. And Connecticut Shade is the exact opposite of a strong wrapper.


Last year, Joya de Nicaragua released the Antaño CT. With all Nicaraguan filler and a Nicaraguan binder. As the wrapper, an Ecuadorian Connecticut Shade was chosen. There are four sizes available, from the 6×54 Belicoso to the 5 ¼ x46 Corona Gorda. In between, you’ll find a 6×50 Toro and this 5×52 Robusto. Juan Martinez from Joya de Nicaragua gave me this cigar at the 2019 Intertabac trade show.


The cigar doesn’t look appealing due to the yellowish-brown color of the wrapper. There is a vein on the wrapper and the triple cap is sloppy. The ring makes up for it. Bright golden with red, clean and clear. The cigar feels well made. It’s evenly filled. The aroma is nice and strong. The cigar has a smell much like sawdust.


The cold draw is perfect, the ideal amount of resistance. And the flavor is strong, bold. Peppery raw tobacco, which is a promising sign. Once lit, there is sweetness, vinegar, and that classic Connecticut Shade mustiness with leather and sawdust. The cigar remains smooth with sweetness, mustiness, and leather. Slowly the wood is getting stronger and a little pepper shows up. The wood and sweetness now overpower that classic Connecticut Shade mustiness. There is also some hay in the flavor profile. The second third starts sweet with hints of dried leather, earthiness, spices, and pepper. The mouthfeel is creamy, something that is to be expected from a Connecticut Shade cigar. The final third has more pepper, but the sweetness remains the same. There is also a hint of milk chocolate.


The draw is phenomenal. The silver-gray ash is extremely dense. The smoke is thick, white and there is plenty of it. The burn is straight. This is a smooth cigar, medium-bodied and medium flavored. The smoke time is two hours

Would I buy this cigar again? It’s not bad for a Connecticut Shade, but I prefer different wrappers

number91

Categories: 91, Fabrica de Tabacos Joya de Nicaragua, Joya de Nicaragua, Nicaraguan cigars | Tags: , , , , ,

Hiram & Solomon Fellow Craft Robusto

Hiram & Solomon Fellow Craft Robusto. Freemasons George Dakrat and Fouad Kashouty are passionate cigar smokers. For years they wondered why there weren’t any cigars with the Freemason symbol. After years of research and getting the right approval, they made 1000 cigars as a fundraiser. That was such a success, that it created the idea of a regular production line. And now, just a few years later, Hiram & Solomon has a series of regular production lines. All of the lines are named after ranks in the Freemason society.


The Fellow Craft is the second tier. Like all other Hiram & Solomon cigars, they are made at Plasencia Cigars in Nicaragua. For the Fellow Craft, the duo blended Habano tobacco from the Nicaraguan regions Ometepe and Jalapa with a Habano Ligero from Esteli. For the binder, they chose Sumatra seed tobacco from Indonesia. And the wrapper is Habano Oscuro from Nicaragua. There are four vitolas available in this line, but we smoked the 5½x50 Robusto.


The cigar looks good. It’s dark, but still quite light for an obscure wrapper. The ring is beautiful. Blue, black and silver with the masonic logo. The foot ring is black and silver with the name of the line. The oily leathery wrapper has a few thin veins and a water spot. The shape and head look good. The construction feels fine with a nice spongy touch. The aroma of the cigar is wood with barnyard.


The cold draw is great. Very spicy raw tobacco is the flavor in the cold draw. Once lit, the cigar releases coffee, leather, wood, and green herbs. Slowly sugar comes in play as well, with a little chili pepper in the aftertaste. Some earthiness shows up too. After a centimeter, leather takes over the dominant role. With a hint of milk chocolate. The aftertaste is still pepper, red pepper flakes. The mouthfeel is dry. The rest of the first third is leathery with wood, soil, herbs, and pepper. There’s even a little hay in the range of flavors too. The second third starts with that smooth leather again. The leather gets accompanied by toast, spice, and pepper. Halfway milk chocolate returns as well. With some nuts. Almost like Nutella. Thick and creamy. Then the wood and leather become stronger again, with more pepper. And there is a vegetal flavor, almost like raw carrots.


The burn is good. The draw is very good. The white smoke is thick and full. The construction of this cigar is great. The ash is white and dense. The cigar is medium-bodied and medium-full flavored. The smoke time is exactly two hours.

Would I buy this cigar again? Yes, I liked it.

number91

Categories: 91, Hiram & Solomon, Nicaraguan cigars, Plasencia | Tags: , , ,

PSyKo SEVEN Nicaragua Robusto

PSyKo SEVEN Nicaragua Robusto. That’s a long name. It’s the latest addition to the PSyKo SEVEN brand that already had the Psyko SEVEN, Psyko SEVEN Maduro, and the PSyKo SEVEN Connecticut. All of the blends are made in the Dominican Republic, except for the PSyKo SEVEN Nicaragua. For this cigar, Ventura Cigar Co. worked with the young and talented Indiana Ortez. She helped to blend the cigar and the cigars are made at her father’s factory in Condega, Nicaragua.


With that, the PSyKo SEVEN Nicaragua can really carry the Nicaraguan name. Especially when all the tobacco is Nicaraguan too. It’s not like some competitors that use the Nicaragua name for cigars made in other countries with little Nicaraguan tobacco, such as the new Camacho Nicaragua. The wrapper leaves for the PSyKo SEVEN Nicaragua are grown in a desflorado way. That means that the farmer chopped off the tobacco flower early on in the growing process. It is believed that the leaves will get more nutrients that way. And produce a stronger flavor.


The cigar has a huge ring, so you can’t really see the wrapper. The ring bears Indiana’s signature. There’s also some information about the blend on the ring. Once removed, a secondary ring is revealed. Again with Indiana’s signature and the PSyKo SEVEN logo. According to the description, this is a strong cigar. But the vintage 2007 wrapper doesn’t look strong. The color is quite light. The wrapper is slightly oily and smooth. The cigar looks good and feels good. The triple cap is perfect. The aroma is strong with hay and ammonia smells. Slowly green herbs, pepper, young wood, and grass show up as well.


The cold draw is good with a raw, nutty and raisin-like tobacco flavor. After lighting the cigar is slightly salty, with walnuts and leather. The mouthfeel is thick and sticky, yet not creamy. Soon after the cigar gets a nice balsamico vinegar sourness with leather and pepper. The mouthfeel is still thick, but a little creamy now. There’s also a little nuttiness. The cigar gets stronger and moves towards a pepper, nuts and wood flavor profile. There is still leather in the profile as well. Halfway the cigar gains more in strength. There is wood, leather, some earthiness, pepper and a hint of sweetness. Once the final third starts, the pepper becomes more pronounced and comes more to the forefront. The wood and leather are slowly pushing the nutty and earthiness away. The last part of the cigar doesn’t have any flavor changes anymore.


The draw is flawless. The smoke could be a little thicker though. The ash is coarse, yet firm. Pepper and salt colored. The burn isn’t perfect, it is a little uneven at times but corrects itself. This is an intriguing cigar with a unique flavor palate. Strong yet smooth. With enough evolution to keep it interesting. Nub worthy cigar that lasted for three hours.

Would I buy this cigar again? Yes I would

number91

Categories: 91, Nicaraguan cigars, PSyKo | Tags: , , , ,

Warped Eagles Descent Toro

Warped Eagles Descent Toro. Late last year, Warped announced a new cigar. That would be the Warped Eagles Descent. The cigar is to be expected this year, but in November the Hawaiian R. Field Wine Co. received an exclusive size for this cigar. R. Field Wine Co is an important cigar retailer in the state of Hawaii and had more exclusive cigars in the past. The Tatuaje Fausto is based on an R. Field Wine Co exclusive made by Pete Johnson for example. Trent Fermin of Fermin Cigars in Australia and Marvin Chang from R. Field Wine Co are friends. And so Chang offered Fermin a few boxes to be distributed in Australia.


The Warped Eagles Descent is made at the factory from Eduardo Fernandez. The factory is acclaimed and renowned. Fernandez is also known for his Aganorsa Leaf. The Tabacos Valle de Jalapa produces more cigars for Warped, but also for Illusione and many other highly rated brands. The brand new Gurkha Treinta also comes from TABSA, as the factory is called in short. For the Warped Eagles Descent, Warped owner and blender Kyle Gellis picked all Nicaraguan tobaccos. The exclusive size for R. Field Wine Co is 5⅝x52, that’s either a short Toro or a big Robusto.


The cigar looks tasty. A dark chocolate colored wrapper, smooth and oily. It feels silky. And the ring is detailed, dark but detailed. Black, orange and white, with a beautiful eagle. It’s almost the logo of a stylish, rugged jeans brand. The construction feels good, no plugs can be detected while gently squeezing the cigar. The aroma is quite strong. Barnyard, stable and spices are what come to mind.


The cold draw is good. The flavor in the cold draw is nothing by dry, spicy tobacco. Once lit, the cigar has a flavor of autumn leaves. Dried leaves with some soil and coffee bitterness. The flavors then turn to more spices. But the spices taste a little burnt, a little harsh. After a centimeter, the cigar gets more pepper and sweetness. But the spices are still around as well. The burnt sensation disappears, making the cigar more accessible. The soil, leafy flavor is getting stronger. And there is some leather and wood too. A nice nut flavor emerges. After a third, there’s coffee, soil, leather, dark wood, pepper, and some sweetness. Now and then a hint of vanilla can be tasted. The cigar becomes more pleasant with toast, vanilla, sweetness, and pepper. Almost like a peppery version of French toast. The next flavor change comes around the halfway point. Dry leather, wood, coffee, and pepper. With a dry mouthfeel. Slowly some salt comes into play as well.


The draw is phenomenal. And the smoke is great too. Thick, white and plentiful. The light gray ash is like a stack of dimes. The burn is razor-sharp. This medium to medium full-bodied cigar packs plenty of flavors. But it takes a while before it becomes good. The smoke time is three hours and fifteen minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? Nah, there are better Warped cigars out there.
number91

Categories: 91, Nicaraguan cigars, TABSA, Warped | Tags: , , , , ,

Kafie 1901 Don Fernando Toro Bello

Kafie 1901 Don Fernando Toro Bello. Made at Tabacalera Kafie y Cia, one of the few remaining cigar factories in Honduras. Where there once were many factories in the Latin American country, only a few remains. Currently, there are less than 15 different factories still producing cigars in Honduras. Just to compare that, in and around Esteli there are over 100 factories large and small. Dr. Gaby Kafie left his full-time job as a physician in Florida to become a cigar manufacturer in his native Honduras. He and his team try to continue the cigar legacy of Honduras by preserving the cigar-making art.


The cigars are available in different sizes, but the one reviewed is the 6×54 Toro Bello. Other sizes available are a 5×50 Robusto and a 6½x52 Belicoso. There are also two 60 ring cigars, one 5 inches, and the other 6 inches in length. The Nicaraguan Cuban Seed wrapper is aged for 5 to 6 years before being used. The Honduran binder and the Nicaraguan and Dominican fillers are aged 3 to 4 years. Tabacalera Kafie is aging the tobacco at their factory warehouse.

The cigar looks good. A dark, smooth yet dry looking wrapper. But the triple cap looks a bit off, it’s like the torcedor used a different leaf for the second of the three caps, as it’s lighter than the rest. The glossy black and gold label is fine, print quality is good. Due to the size and color, the cigar looks impressive. While gently squeezing the cigar, not plugs or soft spots are detected. The aroma is strong, hay, stable, barnyard, those kinds of aromas.


The cold draw is great, with some sweet tobacco in the flavor. Once lit, the cigar delivers sweet coffee. The cigar then picks up in flavor and strength. Pepper, coffee, sweetness, and leather. The coffee is the strongest flavor, supported by the other mentioned flavors and citrus acidity. The flavors intensify, some mushroom and complex bitterness of dark chocolate are added. After a third, there is more wood, leather, and soil. The sweetness and citrus disappeared, but the coffee and pepper are still strong. Halfway the flavors are wood, leather, soil, and pepper with grass. The coffee makes a comeback, with dried leather and herbs. The final third starts with wood, leather and an unpleasant bitterness. The bitterness tones down, and makes place for spices and pepper. Coffee and some cocoa show up too.


The draw is great. The cigar produces a lot of smoke, thick and white. The burn had to be corrected once or twice. This cigar is flavorful, it has character and balance. The light-colored ash is semi-firm. This is a well balanced, rounded cigar with plenty of character. It’s full-bodied, full-flavored. The smoke time is three hours and twenty-five minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? Yes!

number91

Categories: 91, Honduran cigars, Kafie, Tabacalera Kafie y Cia

Blog at WordPress.com.