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Henk Maori Haka

Henk Maori Haka. For those that don’t know the luxury brand Henk, they make bespoke travel bags and accessories. All high quality, and personalized. And brand owner Heiko Poerz is an avid cigar smoker. His last creation that will hit the market soon is the travel humidor Henk Cigarbone. Poerz was lacking cigars that matched his palate, so he went out to create his own. And for that, he asked the help from Didier Houvenaghel and A.J. Fernandez. Houvenaghel is a Belgian agricultural engineer, who studied in Pinar del Rio amongst other places. And he took his knowledge to write a book, from Soil to Soul. That’s the most comprehensive book on tobacco out there. And he owns D.H. Boutique cigars.


Houvenaghel, Fernandez, and Poerz started blending. And together they created a blend that was exactly what Poerz wanted. An all Nicaraguan cigar in a 5⅗x56 size. It’s a regular production, but in low numbers due to the exclusivity. It’s available in a select number of countries. And every year, Henk releases a limited edition called the Henk Maori Masterpiece. Henk is a luxury brand, and when it comes to the price of this cigar, that shows. It’s right up there with Cohiba, Padron Family Reserve, and Opus X.

The cigar looks great. A milky chocolate-colored wrapper with a nice pigtail. But what catches the eye is the lack of a ring. Instead, the cigar has a tattoo, just like the first two Oliva Masterblend releases. It’s a round logo, with a Maori tribal design and the text Henk Maori Haka. The wrapper itself is leathery and mildly glossy. The construction feels good, and it’s a quite heavy cigar. A strong forest, straw and hay smell accompanies the cigar.


The cold draw is fantastic, with a strong peppery flavor. After lighting, it’s a pleasant coffee flavor instantly with nuts and toast. There are some spice, sweetness, leather and a very mild pepper flavor. All extremely balanced. Subtle, smooth. And the cigar stays smooth and balanced, yet flavorful with a growing black pepper. There’s also some soil after a centimeter. The flavors subtly evolve to more sweetness, with a hint of citrus. There’s also some wood. But it happens so gradually, that it’s an art. The mouthfeel is mild creamy. Halfway the cigar has more wood, oak to be precise. With more spices and still a great dose of pepper. The flavors are more pronounced now. There are roasted nuts, spices, pepper, leather, wood, and some hay. Still well balanced, smooth yet strong.

The draw is flawless. The light-colored ash is dense and firm. The burn is pretty straight. The cigar burns slowly as well, very gradually. The white smoke is thick and plentiful. This cigar is full-bodied and full-flavored. But so well balanced, that you don’t feel the strength. The smoke time is three hours and fifteen minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? For a special occasion yes. I would pick this over any Cohiba, any day.
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Categories: 95, Henk, Nicaraguan cigars, Tabacalera A.J. Fernandez

Dondurma Toro

Dondurma Toro. If you haven’t heard of this cigar, that’s all right. This is a limited edition cigar that Dunbarton Tobacco & Trust made for one specific shop. That shop is Secreto Cigar Bar in Ferndale Michigan. However, we got the cigar in Amsterdam during the launch of the Sin Compromiso El Amsterdammer (see the review here). And we loved it so much, that we requested another one to do this review. And there were only 90 boxes of 10 available. Now, we don’t know a lot about this cigar. All we found was this information on the forums of cigarweekly.com, written by Steve Saka himself.

 

Dondurma is a Liga I created back in 2015 – it features what today has become relative rare tobacco in handmade cigars, a variation of Wisconsin Comstock. I tabled the Liga because IMO while it was solid, it really is only extra special when you retrohale it and then it is magnificent. But there is no way I am ever going to get Retailers to explain this, heck I can’t get them to explain Umbagog correctly… anyhow I made about 1,000 of these cigars. I promised Cigaragua 60 of these for our event this week. After that, I just sent a few to Ronnie Haisha of Secreto Cigar Bar a few to sample because he is a retrohaling fiend. Turns out he loved them and asked if he could sell the rest to his customers and I figured heck if anyone can represent or explain this cigar to folks it is him. There are only about 90 10ct boxes – I will be in Detroit at the end of the month to drink The Balvenie US and smoke Dondurma. I can make more, but it will always be in tiny batches like this, I simply do not have enough Comstock, nor do I plan on ever having a lot of Comstock.

The cigar looks fantastic. A dark, Colorado Maduro colored wrapper with some veins. There are also some sparkles from the minerals in the wrapper. And a dark gray ring, and popping golden letters. A nice little pigtail finishes the looks. The wrapper feels very silky. The box pressing gives the cigar a slender look. The cigar feels well constructed. The aroma is strong, it’s the classic barnyard aroma that belongs with cigars.

 

The cold draw is great. Flavors of raw tobacco, powdered sugar and raising come to mind. After lighting it’s a mixture of toast, coffee, nuts, spice, and sweetness. It evolves to spicy leather, and soil, while the coffee and nut flavors disappear. Slowly there’s a sweetness and creaminess appearing. And with that combination, the name Dondurma (Turkish for ice cream) makes sense. Both Steve Saka and Ronnie Haisha (from Secreto Cigar Bar) mentioned that this cigar is perfect for the retrohale. And they are right. The retrohale isn’t aggressive, as it often is, but brings a new dimension to the cigar. In the retrohale, the toast and nuts flavor return but it also enhance the ice cream reference. The main flavors are that creamy sweetness, supported by oak, leather, and soil. After a third, the cigar gets more of a chewy, yet creamy mouthfeel. Still with the sweetness, leather, and pepper. The final third has more wood, more roasted coffee, some vegetal flavors, and that peppery, sweet cream.

 

The draw is great. The smoke is full and white. The burn is almost flawless. The white colored ash is firm. The balance of this smooth cigar is great. Even though there is a pepper, it’s never overpowering. The cigar is medium-bodied yet full-flavored. The smoke time is two hours and thirty minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? I wish that was possible
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Categories: 95, Dondurma, Fabrica de Tabacos Joya de Nicaragua, Nicaraguan cigars | Tags: , , ,

Joya de Nicaragua Cinco Decadas Diadema

That’s one of the two vitolas that Joya de Nicaragua released of this blend. And the Cinco Decadas stands for the 50th anniversary of the factory. Opened in 1968 and still standing. It’s the oldest factory in Nicaragua and carries a lot of history. Even though the factory has been renovated and restored after the revolution, there are still bullet holes in the building. During the renovation, those were preserved. To remind everybody about that era, from 1979 to 1990. Esteli was one of the epicenters of the revolution. And the Joya de Nicaragua factory was the highest building in town. So it was used as a sniper outpost, and therefore being shot at a lot too. Yet the building survived, and Joya de Nicaragua is bigger and stronger than ever.

Last year, at the 50th birthday of Joya de Nicaragua, the company released a book. And this line. Both called Cinco Decadas, five decades. The book was written by Nick Hammond, click here for an interview. Joya de Nicaragua did not reveal much about the cigar. They only said that some of their best Nicaraguan tobacco is used in the blend. But not what kind of tobacco. Or if it’s a 100% Nicaraguan cigar. There are only two vitolas, this diadema, and a 7×50 Churchill. Again with a link to history, as these are vitolas rolled back in the day as well. The cigars have been received well, with scores high in the 90 by several established magazines and blogs.


The cigar is dark. And oily. With a beautiful wrapper, smooth yet intimidating. The shape is fantastic with a beautiful pointy head. The creme colored ring with golden details and the name in red is classic yet modern, it fits the brand and the blend. The construction feels good. The aroma is medium strong, And it smells like hay or straw in a musty shed.


The cold draw is great, even though only a small part was clipped. There are some leather and some sweetness in the cold draw. As well as a raw tobacco flavor. From the moment the cigar is lit, it’s all coffee. Strong, dark roast coffee. Then it turns to coffee, pepper, leather, and chocolate. This cigar starts strong. There are subtle hints of hay, sweetness, wood, and spices, that all come and go with each puff. The flavors are well balanced. After third, dark chocolate with coffee become the main flavors. Supported by leather and pepper. And sweetness best compared to dried fruits. All balanced by nice citrus acidity. Slowly a little mustiness shows up, but it’s not a Connecticut Shade mustiness. It’s different. The last third starts with a balanced, complex, dark chocolate flavor and pepper. The mouthfeel is creamy. There’s a hint of vanilla in the smoke too. There’s also that citrus acidity and some hay. A mild salty flavor is there as well.

The draw is fantastic. The smoke is good, but a little thicker and more voluminous would have been fitting. The ash is white in color. Unfortunately, it’s not very firm. The burn is straight and slow. Keep puffing though, to keep the cigar lit. This is not a cigar you can rest and come back to a few minutes later. This cigar is full bodied, full flavored. Joya wanted to create something special for their 50th anniversary and clearly succeeded.

Would I buy this cigar again? Even though it has a high price, I want a box.

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Categories: 95, Fabrica de Tabacos Joya de Nicaragua, Joya de Nicaragua, Nicaraguan cigars | Tags: , , , ,

Diesel Unholy Cocktail

Before I got my job in the cigar industry, a job I’m no longer working in, I used to participate in ordering cigars from the USA even though that is legally not allowed in The Netherlands. It is allowed to bring in 50 cigars in person, but internet orders are prohibited. Yet I did it because of the huge difference in availability of cigars and the prices back then with a low dollar and a strong euro. And one of the cigars I bought often because I loved them for flavor and price was the Diesel Unholy Cocktail, made by A.J. Fernandez for Meier & Dutch, a wholesaler connected to cigarsinternational.com. But as soon as I landed my job I had to stop of course and hated that I could not buy these great cigars again.


After two years of nagging I finally got my employer so far that he said “ok, see if you can get in touch with them” and so happened, after a few mails and me accidentally running into my contact when I was visiting Esteli, Nicaragua, we agreed that we would distribute their cigars in The Netherlands. I made a selection from their exclusive cigars and of course I included the Diesel Unholy Cocktail and they were an instant hit in The Netherlands too, becoming a big part of our turnover. I just realized that I only have a few of these 5×56 belicosos left so I should do a review.


The cigar comes wrapped in cellophane and once I take the cigar out of that protective layer I see a dark  and rustic wrapper, very toothy and it feels a bit like sandpaper but the look fit the name and the flavor profile. The cigar only has a small foot ring, brown with a darker brown medieval font written Diesel and a smaller written diesel in a beige color. Simple but again, it fits the cigar. The construction feels great and the belicoso has a sharp head. The aroma is quite strong, I smell manure, a little ammonia and hay.


Since it’s a belicoso I have to cut the cigar and I do so with my Xikar cutter. The cold draw is perfect. I taste a spicy, peppery raisin flavor. Once I light the cigar I taste cocoa powder, dry cedar and coffee beans. Soon I taste pepper, a faint cocoa powder and a strong earthy flavor. After little over half an inch I also taste some nuts. After a third the main flavor is earthy with spices, peanuts, a little lemon and pepper. Every few puffs I taste some cocoa powder too. Halfway the cigar has a dark chocolate sweetness and bitterness with nutmeg, wood and pepper. The pepper is getting stronger just like the wood.


The draw is fantastic just as the smoke, which is thick and full. The ash is white, dense and firm. The burn is straight as an arrow. The cigar is so full flavored and bold that it tastes like it’s a very full bodied cigar but truth is, it’s medium full. There is a lot of evolution. The smoke time is an hour and twenty five minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? Hell yeah!

Score: 95
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Categories: 95, Diesel, Nicaraguan cigars, Tabacalera A.J. Fernandez | Tags: , , , , ,

La Casita Criolla HCB

Years ago, I hadn’t even Tatuajestart to work for my later (and now previous) employer who’s one of the major cigar importers & distributers in The Netherlands, Pete Johnson released both the La Casita Criollo and the Fausto and I got a call from my later employer who told me the cigars showed up on the international price list, he didn’t know what they were, he gave me prices and asked weather he should order them or not. I knew about the cigars, I smoked the Tatuaje T110 where the Fausto is based upon, and read about the La Casita Criolla too and thought it was an interesting concept, the prices were fine so I advised him to order both lines. And he did. Today is also Pete’s birthday, so happy birthday my friend.


The La Casita Criolla is made with a 100% American Connecticut broadleaf, the cigar is an American puro. Now Connecticut broadleaf is known as a wrapper or sometimes a binder but it being used as a filler isn’t something known to the general public, it happens as not all Connecticut broadleaf is dark enough or of the quality needed to be a wrapper. And that’s the kind of leaf Pete Johnson uses for filler in this La Casita Criolla, the lighter colored, the esthetically lesser quality leaf but still flavorful. The only thing I don’t like about it is the naming of the vitolas, why not just go with corona, robusto, torpedo, churchill but with a HCB, HCBC, HFBF, HCR which to me, and not just me alone, very confusing and I think it hurts the sales. I am not a 100% sure but I think the La Casita Criolla name comes from an old Cuban brand.


I grabbed the HCB out of my humidor, which is a 5 1/8×42 corona sized cigar. The cigars are naked in the box, no cellophane to protect the wrapper during transport. The wrapper is dark, juicy and oily with here and there a glittering of minerals, the veins make it look rustic and with the dark color combined it looks a bit intimidating. The ring is very simple, just like the packaging, brown with a white square and red letters La Casita Criolla, then a red square with white letters Tatuaje Cigars Esteli and the Pete Hassel Johnson logo and a drawing of a small house, the native cottage that the name refers too. The construction feels great and the cap is beautifully glued onto its place. The aroma isn’t very strong, just tobacco, barnyard and a little chocolate.


I cut the cigar, xikar butterfly style, and that creates a perfect cold draw with a spicy and peppery touch. I taste a full and nice sweetened coffee. After half an inch the cigar turns to chocolate, coffee and pepper. The chocolate is getting stronger after a third with wood and a little bit of pepper. The pepper fades away a little, I taste caramel with oak, a little chocolate and some spices.


The draw is perfect and the white ash is dense and firm. The luscious smoke is white and full. The burn is close to perfect as well. The evolution isn’t spectacular but the flavors are, right up my alley. The cigar is medium bodied and full flavored. The smoke time is an hour and ten minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? If I had to pick 10 cigars that I could smoke the rest of my life, this cigar would make the cut.

Score: 95
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Categories: 95, La Casita Criolla, My Father Cigars, Nicaraguan cigars | Tags: , , , , , ,

My Father 9/11 Nicaragua Habano Oscuro Robusto

Last year, also on September 11, I published a review of the My Father 9/11 Ecuador Rosado Habano robusto that came from on of the 343 boxes that My Father Cigars and Casa de Montecristo released in 2011, 10 years after the terrorist attacks by Al Qaida and Osama Bin Laden. Since the box carried 9 of the Ecuador Rosado Habano and 11 Nicaraguan Habano Oscuro cigars I thought it was a good idea to review the Nicaraguan version this year to commemorate all that lost their lives at the attack on the Twin Towers.


Now that I’m grabbing this cigar I can’t believe that it’s already 17 years ago since those attacks and the world hasn’t been the same. It caused a war on Iraq on false information, it caused a war and man hunt in Afghanistan to get the mastermind behind the attacks. The war in Iraq was the cause for the rise of ISIS and destabilized the whole middle east, leading to terrorist attacks all over Europe, Asia, Africa and North America leading to millions of death, millions of refugees, PTSD for both veterans and civilians living in the war zones that will haunt society for decades to come. I’m usually a pretty upbeat and positive person yet when I look at the state the world is in, with populism on the rise, racism back out in the open, a lack of diplomacy, the garbage that is spilled on social media where people are calling each other libtards, snowflakes, racists etcetera for having a different political view instead of respecting each others perspective, it makes me sad. And I think a lot of it is the aftermath of this world changing terrorist attack.


The cigar comes naked, that means no ring, no marking whatsoever. The wrapper is dark and smooth, oily and has a velvet feel to it. The cigar feels good, the head is nice and round, the triple cap is nice. The aroma is quite strong and reminds me of a barnyard, some manure, some hay, some grass, some straw, some animals. Nice.


I decapped the cigar with my xikar cutter. The cold draw is great and quite peppery. Right after lighting I taste toast with cinnamon and a little cedar. After a third it’s more toast, nutmeg, a hint of dark chocolate and some oregano. Halfway I taste wood, oak, with pepper. The pepper is getting stronger and stronger.


The draw is fantastic and so is the smoke. Thick, full and voluminous. The ash is white, with some black spots, dense and firm. This cigar is medium full bodied and flavored. The smoke time is an hour and a half.

Would I buy this cigar again? That would be impossible

Score: 95
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Categories: 95, My Father, My Father Cigars, Nicaraguan cigars | Tags: , , , , ,

La Preferida 452

Didier Houvenaghel is a Belgian agricultural engineer who’s passion is tobacco and he wrote what is probably the best book about cigars ever: The cigar: from soil to soul. I have seen the book, read parts from it but I have yet to find a copy for myself but the book is out of print and its not available on Amazon, Ebay or any other sites that I know. Maybe I should ask Didier when I see him either in Singapore where both his and my wife live or at the Intertabac trade show.


Didier also started his own cigar brands, La Ley and Nicarao but last year he expanded with a new line, La Preferida. All his cigars are made by A.J. Fernandez and Didier handed me this cigar in person. The cigar comes in two sizes, 4×52 or 5×52 an its made with Honduran and Nicaraguan filler, a Mexican binder and an Ecuadorian Habano Colorado wrapper. I smoked the 4×52 for this review.


The dark chocolate colored wrapper looks smooth, not big veins, a nice even color, a very clean wrapper. The ring is very classic, just a 1920’s era lady on the baby blue ring and a yellow banner with the La Preferida name. The cigar feels well constructed and looks good.  A medium dark aroma finishes the cigar, I think of dark chocolate with some pepper.


I used a butterfly cutter to decap the cigar. The cold draw is perfect, I get a spicy tangy flavor on my lips. After lighting I taste a strong, pleasant espresso with a subtle sweetness. There is also a hint of cocoa. After a third it’s a spicy coffee and cedar combination with a little chocolate. After a third I taste wood with cocoa, a little sweetness, spice and pepper. Halfway the cigar gets sweeter, with some vanilla over spices and dry cedar. There are subtle changes in flavor, the final third has something floral, with still some pepper.


The draw is flawless, the smoke is thick, white and voluminous. The ash is white, dense and firm. I’m positive awed by the balance in the strong flavor. The burn is great. This cigar is full bodied and full flavored. The smoke time is long, an hour and fifty minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? Yes, over and over again. I loved it so much that I grabbed my Nub tool.

Score: 95
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Categories: 7-20-4, 95, La Preferida, Nicaraguan cigars, Tabacalera A.J. Fernandez | Tags: , , , ,

Jas Sum Kral Red Knight Soloman

Jas Sum Kral owner has his own two day cigar festival every year, Ristefari, and for the inaugural 2017 edition he decided to make a limited edition of his Red Knight cigar in a Salomon shape, called to soloman. Only 1000 of the cigars were made, 100 boxes of 10, and they were only for sale during Ristefari with a MSRP of $12. And I got two of them now, a gift from Riste.


When these 7×58 cigars were made, Riste still had his cigars made at Tabacalera NOA, owned by Noel Rojas. That partnership has sailed, Jas Sum Kral is now made in the small factory of Roniel Aragon, a previous employer of Noel Rojas who ventured out on his own. As for this vitola, Jas Sum Kral made it again but in a variation of the Zlatno Sonce blend for Ristefari 2018 and I reviewed the cigar last month.


I am not a fan of big ring gauges but in a shape like this I don’t oppose it. I mean, one of my favorite cigars is actually shaped like this. The wrapper is a tad darker than what I’m used to from Jas Sum Kral, it goes towards a dark chocolate color and it has a mild leathery look. The construction feels great, the shape is beautiful. The aroma is quite mild, woody and a bit soapy.


After cutting the cigar I taste a spicy peppery flavor with a perfect resistance. After lighting it’s pepper and coffee, earthy flavors. There is also a cane-sugar tasting sweetness. The sugar is getting stronger with cedar and pepper as support flavors. Secretly the cigar gains strength and I taste something that reminds me a bit of carrots. It’s not exactly carrot but it is similar. I tasted this a few times before in cigars, and I like it. The sweetness remains, the carrot disappears, it’s now a wooden flavor with some green leafy herbs, a little cinnamon and pepper. Little passed the midway point it’s oak with pepper and spicy green herbs, the sweetness is gone. The pepper grows and becomes dominant in the final third, it blows all other flavors away.


The draw is great, the ash is light in color, a little frayed and with clear rings. The burn is good. The smoke is medium thick, grayish and medium of volume. The smoke time is two hours and forty minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? That wouldn’t be possible.

Score: 95
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Categories: 95, Jas Sum Kral, Nicaraguan cigars, Tabacalera Noa | Tags: , , , , , , ,

Jas Sum Kral Kralot Toro (pre-release)

I have known Riste, the owner of Jas Sum Kral, for years and even got him his first international distribution deal outside of the USA. Last month he came over to Europe for a two day event in The Netherlands, a few events in Sweden and the Intertabac trade show in Dortmund, Germany. During his days in The Netherlands I was his host and designated driver, a video of that trip can be seen here.


While he was here Riste handed me a handful of the 2018 release, the Kralot, but of course with pre-release rings. Now for fair scoring I rate the official artwork, made by Nuzli Hakiim, and not the simple pre-release ring. As far as I know it’s a Nicaraguan puro made at the Tabacalera Noa factory from Noel Rojas, a factory which never let me down.


The artwork now is simple, but the JSK Lion will be on the ring with added details, it will be the bomb. The wrapper is evenly dark, almost black, and it feels like very fine sanding paper. The construction is flawless, evenly packed, great triple cap and a closed foot. The cigar has a very strong, smoky aroma, not as strong as the Kentucky Fire Cured or Pappy van Winkle by Drew Estate but it reminds me of those cigars.


I decided to cut the cigar using my Xikar butterfly cutter. The cold draw is great and spicy. After lighting I taste a smokey barbecue flavor, a bit sour but strong and spicy, with a sweet finish. The strong smokey barbecue flavor mellows out quickly and some vanilla fights it’s way to the surface.  After a third I taste a carrot like flavor, which I love, with spices and sweetness. The barbecue returns with a nice honey sweetness and vanilla, well balanced and sweet. The final third starts out a little spicier, with a little pepper on my tongue. The pepper grows to a strong pepper, overpowering until I have to put the cigar out because I’m burning my fingers.


The draw is perfect, the smoke is full, I get plenty of smoke but it’s not a super thick one. The ash is almost white, a beautiful contrast with the dark wrapper, and its dense and firm. The burn is beautiful and straight. The cigar starts full bodied and full flavored but mellows out to a medium full blend. The smoke time is an hour and forty five minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? Without a doubt, can’t wait till they get released.

Score: 95
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your reviewer and Riste Riatevski (Jas Sum Kral)

Categories: 95, Jas Sum Kral, Nicaraguan cigars, Tabacalera Noa | Tags: , , , , ,

Warped Little Havana Corona Gorda

There are a lot of cigar groups on Facebook and in some of those groups people like to combine days with cigar brands, like Tatuaje Tuesday and Fuente Friday. Since I have so many unpublished reviews and need to post a lot I decided that this week will be a week dedicated to the weekday – cigar combinations and I came up with a few of my own.

This week I will post a review every day, monday to sunday, all with the name tied to the weekday, here’s the list:

Murcielago Monday
Tatuaje Tuesday
Warped Wednesday
Taboo Thursday
Fuente Friday
Santiago Saturday
Sosa Sunday

Warped Wednesday – Warped Little Havana Corona Gorda

Back in the day, I think it was somewhere in 2007, I joined the Club Stogie board and left when it turned into Puff. The eleven moderators of Club Stogie started Cigar Asylum and I joined there and I’ve been a member since. But back then Kyle Gellis from Warped was just a young entrepeneur, his brand existed but wasn’t really active, he sold some cigars on the board and that was it. He has a small stash and when it was sold out it was sold out, it was more of a hobby than a company back then, or at least, that was my impression.

 


I’m very impressed with what Kyle did since the last time I’ve seen him at a cigar event at one of the Smoke Inn shops back in 2010 I think. He’s now one of the highest rating boutique brands and that without a huge social media outreach like other small brands. Because I’m not in the USA since he released all his new cigars I haven’t had the chance to smoke them, I did try to convince my previous employer to start distributing the Nicaraguan made Warped blends but he wouldn’t as he isn’t good with boutique brands. But I still have two, almost a decade old, test blends and two, just as old, Warped Little Havana Private blend cigars, one 5.5×44 Corona Grande and one torpedo and I will review the corona grande today on Warped Wednesday.

 


Now Kyle never confirmed or denied that these cigars were made by El Titan de Bronze but seeing his ties to that factory, the name of the blend and the fact that he did say that these were Miami made cigars I am fairly sure that they are made by Sandy Cobas and her team. The cigar has a beautiful deep dark brown color with beautiful thin veins and just looks mouth watering. The construction feels good, all evenly packed, no soft spots or plugs with a beautiful cap. The ring is simple, just a small back ring with a toxic green colored Warped in a fancy font. On the back side, and I love this detail, it says private blend 8/27/08 so I know exactly when the cigar was made. The aroma is still there after all these years, wood but not the fresh wood kind, a hint of dark chocolate and some floral notes.

 


I cut the cigar and unfortunately damage the cap because I used the cheap freebie cutter that was in my reach instead of getting up and getting one of my Xikar or Palio cutters. The cold draw is great and has a floral taste with a peppery aftertaste. A vintage cigar needs to be lit with a vintage lighter so I grabbed my Ronson varaflame and lit the cigar. I taste spices like nutmeg, cinnamon with a caramel like sweetness. After a few puffs I taste oak with the spices and a mild peppery aftertaste. After a third I taste peppery floral flavors with a mild cedar. Slowly the spices and cedar get stronger, a little lime shows up too and the pepper is also on the rise. Near the end the floral flavor is back and with some strength. I also taste a little salt

 


The draw is perfect and so is the smoke. White, thick, plentiful, just the way I like it. The burn isn’t completely straight though. The ash however is firm, and a beautiful light gray. The cigar is medium bodied and medium full flavored. The evolution is great in this complex and extremely well balanced cigar. The smoke time is an hour and forty minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? I wish.

Score: 95
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Categories: 95, American cigars, Tabacalera El Titan de Bronze, Warped | Tags: , , , , , , ,

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