Posts Tagged With: 92

Perdomo Estate Seleccion Vintage Sun Grown Regente

Perdomo Estate Seleccion Vintage Sun Grown Regente. A line re-introduced in 2016, and as almost always with Perdomo, it came with sisters. Many Perdomo lines come in Connecticut Shade, Sun Grown, and Maduro. At first, the line came on the market in 2005, with vintage tobaccos from the 1991 harvest. Nick Perdomo Sr purchased that tobacco in 1995, so by the time it hit the market, the tobacco was true vintage. When the tobacco was all used, the line disappeared. But it returned in 2016, again with vintage tobaccos from the Perdomo tobacco library.

During episode 13 of The Philip & Ferdy Cigar Show, the guys were introduced to this cigar. That was at Cigar Malaysia at the Ansa Hotel in Kuala Lumpur. Extra cigars were purchased to review this cigar. All the tobacco in this blend is Nicaraguan. The same goes for the Maduro version. The only Perdomo Estate Seleccion Vintage blend that isn’t a Nicaraguan puro is the Connecticut version. That blend uses an Ecuadorian Connecticut wrapper.

The cigar looks amazing. The shiny, oily, reddish-brown wrapper is flawless. The sharp veins that are visible are from the binder. And then the ring, one of the prettiest in the game. Copper-colored, glossy with different shades of brown and lots of gold. The only other colors used are some black and white for the Perdomo logo. The cigar feels well constructed. It has a medium-strong aroma of hay and wood.

The cold draw is fine. With a flavor profile of salt, raw tobacco, and a little nut. After lighting, there is coffee, citrus, pepper, leather, and soil. A nutty flavor shows up too, with cedar. All with nice citrus that binds it together. The mouthfeel is meaty. The cedar gets a little stronger, there is some spice as well. The acidity disappeared. The second third starts with pepper, nuts, and sweetness. The final third has more wood, leather, and soil. But still with pepper, spice, and even some coffee.

The draw is fantastic. The burn is good. In the beginning, it looked like there would be an issue but the burn corrected itself. A good amount of smoke, with a nice thickness. Construction on the cigar is great. The light-colored ash is reasonably firm. The cigar is medium-full bodied. And full-flavored. Yet all while being smooth. The smoke time is three hours.

Would I buy this cigar again? Due to the price not often.

Categories: 92, Nicaraguan cigars, Perdomo, Tabacalera Perdomo | Tags: , , ,

Drew Estate BOTL Lancero

Drew Estate BOTL Lancero. The online community Brothers of the Leaf aka botl.org. Starting in 2010, some manufacturers work with the community and release limited edition cigars. PDR was the first, with Drew Estate following two years later. Since 2013, Drew Estate released several versions of the BOTL.

In 2020, Drew Estate released three sizes for botl. The cigar has an American Connecticut Broadleaf wrapper. There is an Ecuadorian Connecticut binder. The filler comes from Nicaragua. It is available in three sizes, Corona, Corona Gorda, and this 7×38 Lancero

This is not the prettiest cigar. But then again, most Connecticut Broadleaf cigars aren’t the prettiest in the humidor. The harsh sun is beating down on the plants every day, and just like the human skin, tobacco leaves start to look weathered under that constant violence from Mother Nature. But it fits the cigar, a thick oily rough looking wrapper, very dark with some rough veins. Add in the brown and copper-colored band with BOTL printed on it, and it does look appealing. The construction feels good. The aroma is a mixture of floral aromas and dark chocolate.

The cold draw is good. There is a spicy raw tobacco flavor in the cold draw. After lighting it’s very dark chocolate, like 85% or higher. The chocolate remains the main flavor but after a while, little floral flavors, vanilla bean sweetness, and a hint of the leather show up. Slowly towards the second third, there is a spice joining as well. There is coffee beneath the dark chocolate flavor too. The sweetness gets stronger while the dark chocolate bitterness tones down a bit. But it does not disappear. 

The ash is white as the hair of Gandalf. The smoke is a classic Drew Estate. That means thick, white, and a lot. The draw is great. The burn is straight as an arrow. This cigar isn’t as heavy as the appearance might suggest. It’s medium to medium-full in body and flavor. Well, balanced and the sweetness makes it very palatable. The smoke time is two hours and thirty minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? Yes

Categories: 92, Gran Fabrica Drew Estate, Nicaraguan cigars, Undercrown | Tags: , , , ,

La Sagrada Familia Sun Grown Toro

La Sagrada Familia Sun Grown Toro. Early 2017, Dutch entrepreneur and cigar aficionado Tom Mulder launched his La Sagrada Familia brand. As a passionate cigar enthusiast, Mulder thought about starting a brand. With help from his long-time friend Sasja van Horssen, he got in touch with Joya de Nicaragua. After a trip to Nicaragua and smoking several test blends, La Sagrada Familia was born.

The first blend is a cigar with Nicaraguan filler and binder. The wrapper is Habano from Ecuador. The cigars are popular in Tom’s home country The Netherlands. But when he left a few cigars at a cigar bar in Malaysia during a vacation, Malaysian cigar connoisseurs begged a distributor to carry the brand as well. And now the cigars are also available in Germany. Mulder isn’t looking for quick expansion but is adding more countries slowly.

The cigar looks good. A nice oily Colorado colored wrapper, without any thick veins. A simple ring, yet recognizable and clean in design. White, blue, and silver-gray. The cigar feels good. No detectable plugs of soft spots. The aroma is strong, deep, and intense. Spices, earthy, yet with some sweetness.

The cold draw is perfect. It leaves a spicy, mildly peppery, raising flavor on the palate. The cigar is mild earthy, mildly spicy but the main flavor is a creamy latte. The mouthfeel turns dry. As far as flavors go, some sawdust, caramel, spice, and leather show up. A little vinegar binds the flavors together. The coffee flavor remains, with some leather and hay. Then nutmeg and chocolate show up. At the end of the first third, the cigar has cedar, leather, coffee, pepper, and spices. The coffee remains in the second third, but now with a stronger acidity. The acidity mellows out, leaving more coffee, spice, and a little pepper to shine. The final third has more character. More wood, more leather, little earthiness. Some sweetness in the retrohale. There is a nice dose of pepper as well. All flavors are getting stronger.

The draw is flawless. The white ash is firm. The smoke is thick, white, and full. The burn is razor-sharp. It’s a medium-bodied, medium-full-flavored cigar growing to medium-full in strength. Well balanced and smooth. But the cigar loses character after a year of aging, so we suggest to smoke them when they are on the younger side. The last third had that character that was lacking in the first part. The smoke time is three hours and forty minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? Yes I will

Categories: 92, Fabrica de Tabacos Joya de Nicaragua, La Sagrada Familia, Nicaraguan cigars | Tags: , , , , ,

RoMa Craft Neanderthal SGP

RoMa Craft Neanderthal SGP. This cigar was originally released as an annual limited edition for Riverside Cigar Shop and Lounge of Jeffersonville, Ind. and Serious Cigars of Houston, Texas. But the cigar is now available at more retailers. The first time the cigar was seen was at the IPCPR trade show in 2014. The Neanderthal was a new release that year with one regular production size and this size limited to two stores and a total production of 250 boxes a year. The line has grown to more sizes since then.

This 4¼x52 vitola is made with tobacco from four different countries. The outside is a Mexican wrapper from San Andres. Underneath is an American grown Connecticut Broadleaf binder. The filler comes from the Dominican Republic, Nicaragua, and The United States. Pennsylvania to be more precise. And it is a double Ligero, which is dubbed Green River Sucker One. It contains two to three times more nicotine than Ligero grown in Esteli, Nicaragua.

The cigar looks great. The head is flat as a dime, which is a unique feature for RoMa Craft. As far as we can recall, this is the only company that flattens the head like this. The wrapper is dark, oily, and smooth. The ring doesn’t have letters but the neanderthal name is embossed. The only thing printed on the label is a small RoMa Craft logo. The construction feels perfect. The cigar has a strong aroma. Charred wood, barnyard, and spices.

The cold draw is fantastic. Mild spicy, with great air resistance. Straight from the start, the power flexes its muscles. Coffee, leather, earthiness, pepper, and spice. Or, as Skip Martin would say “well-fermented tobacco”. Slowly more flavors develop. Sweetness, with smokey hickory flavors, almost like a barbecue. With pepper, earthiness, coffee, and leather. Leather, hickory, spices, and pepper remain the main flavors. The flavors turn more to leather and wood with pepper around the halfway point. With a dry mouthfeel. The flavors don’t really change after that. But it’s still a darn tasty cigar.

The draw is great, just like the burn. The cigar produces a lot of smoke, thick, white smoke. The pepper and salt colored ash is reasonably firm. The cigar is strong. It is full-bodied without a doubt. But still balanced. The flavors are full as well. The smoking time is two hours and forty-five minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? Yes.

Categories: 92, Nica Sueno, Nicaraguan cigars, RomaCraft | Tags: , , , , ,

Buffalo Ten Maduro Toro

Buffalo Ten Maduro Toro. When the first rumors about this release surfaced, the name was a mystery. At first, the suggestion was made that it is a cigar for the Buffalo Cigar Festival. But in a conversation with Ram Rodriguez from Tabacalera El Artista, the truth was revealed. The name is chosen because it’s a cool sounding name. Of course, the people behind Buffalo Cigar Festival love the name, but they are not the inspiration. Rodriguez wanted to make a value cigar, one size, simple packaging, and simple artwork. The 10 in the name comes from the first proposed packaging. Bundles of 10 cigars. But eventually, the cigars were released in bundles of five cigars.

The cigar measures 6×52 and is box-pressed. Almost rectangle, much like the Factory Press from La Flor Dominicana. Very sharp edges. This is a five-country cigar blend, with a Mexican wrapper. A Maduro from San Andres. The filler comes from the Dominican Republic, Colombia, and the USA. The Colombian tobacco is used for the slightly acidic flavor, that helps to bind all flavors together. But the tobacco that is most rare is the binder. It’s a Dominican Negrito. Very dark tobacco that was popular 50 to 60 years ago. But it disappeared. Tabacalera El Artista and the Dominican Agricultural Society brought it back to life. It’s hard tobacco to grow, with relatively low yields. So it’s not used often.

The cigar looks amazing. Not just to smoke, but also to eat. The sharp box-pressed shape and the dark chocolate color make this cigar look like a candy bar. Add a simple, clean, and slick white ring and you have an amazing looking cigar. The wrapper is Colorado Maduro colored, with one flattened vein. It’s toothy and feels like fine sandpaper. The ring is white, simple, clean with print in the same color as the wrapper. The two components on itself look fine, yet the combination is extremely pleasing on the eyes. The box press is so sharp, it is almost as sharp as the La Flor Dominicana Factory Press cigars. The construction feels good. The aroma is earth and leather.

The cold draw is flawless. The flavor is earthy. Once lit, the cigar has coffee, soil, sweetness, and herbal spices. The flavors then change to soil, leather, chocolate, pepper, and spice. Leather gets stronger with cedar and pepper. The mouthfeel is dry. The second third starts with cocoa powder. Dry. Add some leather and a hint of acidity to bind everything together. The flavors slowly change to more leather, spices, soil, and wood. With still a hint of chocolate, pepper, and acidity. The final third starts with that dry chocolate or cocoa flavor again. Pepper, leather, and wood are there too. With a hint of sweetness. The mouthfeel is still dry now, but also sticky. There is a spice flavor that is hard to describe, with wood, pepper, and chocolate.

The draw is fantastic, the right amount of airflow and resistance. The burn is straight as an arrow. The cigar produces plenty of thick white smoke. The ash is almost white as well. Firm also. The cigar doesn’t have a lot of evolution. But it is balanced and flavorful. The Buffalo Ten Maduro Toro is a medium-bodied, medium flavored cigar. The smoke time is three hours and fifteen minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? A 92 rated cigar for a value price? Damn right!

Categories: 92, Buffalo Ten, Dominican cigars, Tabacalera El Artista | Tags: , , , , ,

Diamond Crown Julius Caeser Toro

Diamond Crown Julius Caeser Toro. A cigar created to honor and commemorate Julius Caeser Newman. The Eastern European immigrant that started J.C. Newman Cigar Company in 1895. The company is still going strong, with the fourth and fifth-generation now in charge. It’s the oldest, still existing cigar brand in the United States. J.C. Newman makes cigars in Tampa, Florida, and Esteli, Nicaragua. The Dominican cigars from J.C. Newman, including those Diamond Crown Julius Caeser are made at Tabacalera A. Fuente y Cia. Fuente and Newman have a long-lasting relationship. Not only a working relationship when it comes to cigar production. The companies also work together for distribution and charity. The Cigar Family Charity Foundation is the brainchild of Carlito Fuente and the brothers’ Eric & Bobby Newman.

In 2010, the Newman family released this line. With Dominican filler and binder, wrapped in an Ecuadorian Havana wrapper. There are several sizes available, but the sampler that Bobby Newman gave Ministry of Cigars contained this 6×52 Diamond Crown Julius Caeser Toro. If you think that Julius Caeser is written wrongly, you are right and wrong. When the young Newman came to the USA as an immigrant, immigration officers wrote his name incorrectly. Newman never corrected it, and he was known as Julius Caeser for the rest of his life. And for decades after, due to the family heritage and the cigar line carrying his name.

The cigar has an oily, Colorado Maduro colored wrapper. There are some veins. It’s clearly a sun-grown wrapper. Not just the color gives it away, but also the texture and the veins. The ring is Roman Empire inspired with columns and an image of an emperor with a golden wreath. Now it’s the question, is the emperor on the ring Julius Caesar or an image of Julius Caeser Newman, the founder of the J.C. Newman Cigar Company? The cigar feels well constructed. The aroma is strong, vegetal, and earthy.

The cold draw is spicy, peppery, and full of flavor. After lighting, there is a salty, earthy coffee flavor. The same flavors show up in the retrohale as well, but with a little cedar as a bonus. There is a little spice, which comes close to paprika. Very unique and something we never tasted in a cigar before. Slowly the cigar moves to nutty tones, with ground black pepper, leather, and earthy flavors. The earthy flavors are starting to dominate the palate, with pepper as its main accomplice. But the pepper isn’t overpowering, it’s balanced. But after a few puffs, the flavors change to wood. There is a lot of dynamics in the first part of the cigar. The cigar mellows out after that, not in flavor strength, but in dynamics. The wood flavor is the main flavor, with pepper, spices, earthiness, and leather as supporting flavors. After the first third, some dried grass shows up as well. Later on, there is also some citrus and sweetness to go with the previously mentioned flavors. As well as very faint milk chocolate. Cedar gets more pronounced in the retrohale. At the beginning of the final third, the flavors change to leather with pepper, spice, and still that earthiness. The finale sees a lot of pepper.

The draw and the burn are both great. The right amount of resistance, and a very straight burn. The smoke is decent, it could have been a bit thicker though. The salt and pepper colored ash is firm. The cigar is balanced. It’s a medium to full-bodied cigar, full-flavored. Bold almost. The smoke time is three hours exactly.

Would I buy this cigar again? I like it a lot but it’s too expensive for a regular smoke.

Categories: 92, Diamond Crown, Dominican cigars, Tabacalera A. Fuente y Cia | Tags: , , , ,

Gilberto Oliva Reserva Toro

Gilberto Oliva Reserva Toro. A tribute to the man who started the Oliva Cigar Company in Nicaragua in 1995. But that doesn’t mean that the family wasn’t in tobacco before. It all started with Melanio Oliva in 1886. Melanio Oliva, the family patriarch, grew tobacco in Pinar del Rio, Cuba. Gilberto, Melanio’s grandson, fled to Spain and later Nicaragua after the Cuban revolution and after his family’s plantations were taken from them by the thieving Cuban regime. In Nicaragua, he became a tobacco grower again. With his sons Gilberto, Carlos, and José, he created Oliva Cigars. In 2017, at age 86, Gilberto Oliva passes away. Ministry of Cigars was lucky enough to have sat down with this industry legend at the Tabolisa factory in 2014.

To honor their father, Jose, Gilberto Jr, and Carlos created the Gilberto Oliva Reserva line. In the same way, as they did with their great grandfather Melanio. For the Gilberto Oliva Reserva line, they turned to an Indonesian Sumatra wrapper. The binder is from Ecuador. The filler is Nicaraguan, with at least some but probably all coming from the Oliva family farms. Besides producing cigars, Oliva also grows tobacco in Esteli, Condega, and Jalapa. The Oliva Cigar Company is now part of the Belgian family-owned J. Cortes brand.

The cigar is quite good looking. A smooth and oily Colorado Maduro colored Indonesian Sumatra wrapper. At first glance, cigar smokers might not recognize this as an Oliva cigar. The classic logo with the big O is missing from the ring. Dark red, gold, and brown create a more classic looking logo. The construction feels immaculate. A nice triple cap finishes the look. The cigar has a mild spicy aroma.

The cold draw gives a bit more resistance than desired. After the cigar is lit, there is a beautiful mixture of sugar, grass, and dark spices. Full, rounded, smooth. Slowly a little pepper and leather show up too. Black pepper. The spice is a mixture of nutmeg and cinnamon. It is more pronounced in the retrohale. After a third, cedarwood shows up as well. The dark spices remain, with sweetness, and there is even a hint of vanilla. If there is any cigar that makes resembles Coca-Cola in a dry form, this is it. But better. Because there is also cedar, black pepper, and some earthy flavor. The Final third has all of the flavors mentioned above, with some citrus and floral flavors. These flavors remain until the end. Only the mouthfeel changes and becomes a bit dry.

The draw is good. The ash is white as ash can be, a sign of tobacco from potassium-rich soil. The burn is straight and slow. The smoke is thick. It’s white and there is a lot of it. This is a cigar medium in body yet full in flavor. Well balanced and very pleasant, yet the cigar could use a little more character. The smoke time is three hours and twenty minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? I want a box

Categories: Oliva, Tabacalera Oliva | Tags: , , ,

Rocky Patel Number 6 Robusto

Rocky Patel Number 6 Robusto. One of the latest releases of Rocky Patel, released at the IPCPR trade show in July 2019. The number 6 is named after the test blend. Several test blends were made, and the 6th blend was picked. So that became the Rocky Patel Number 6. The cigar is available in several sizes, and for this review, we selected the 5½x50 Robusto.


Unlike most of the recent releases by Rocky Patel, this cigar is made in Honduras. For the last few years, most new cigars came from Patel’s factory in Nicaragua, Tavicusa. But this Number 6 is made at El Paraiso in Danli, Honduras. The blend consists of filler tobaccos from Nicaragua and Honduras. The binder is Honduran. And as a wrapper, Patel and his team picked a Honduran Corojo

The black and golden ring is huge. It covers half the cigar, and then there is another ring at the foot. But the matte black details, shiny gold and white letters work well together. The wrapper, as far as we can see, has a few thin veins. The color is great, and there is a light oily shine. The cigar feels well constructed. The medium-strong aroma is woody with some hay.


The cold draw is good, with a flavor of hay and allspice. The first puffs give coffee and dirt with pepper. There are spices as well. After that, it’s spicy and strong leather that tickles the back of the throat. Soon after the nuttiness from the Corojo wrapper shows up as well. To balance everything, there’s mild fruity citrus. The flavors change to nuts, leather, wood, hay, and sweetness. In the final third, the cigar has more wood, the sweetness and pepper are still there. The nut flavor is gone. The cigar starts to tingle in the back of the throat again.


The draw is great. The pepper and salt colored ash isn’t very firm though. The smoke is thick and plentiful and the burn is straight as an arrow. This is a medium-full bodied cigar, full-flavored. Well balanced, with character. But it’s not smooth. This is a cigar for a more experienced cigar smoker. The smoke time is three hours.

Would I buy this cigar again? Yes

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Categories: 92, El Paraiso, Honduran cigars, Rocky Patel | Tags: , , ,

Charatan Colina Robusto

Charatan Colina Robusto. The name Charatan might not be known to many cigar smokers unless you are familiar with the British market. Charatan is a brand founded in Britain, and only available there for now. The brand was founded by Frederick Charatan in 1863 as a pipe brand. He carved Meerschaum pipes and briar pipes. Frederik’s son Reuben took over the business and until 1960, it was a family business. Dunhill Tobacco of London acquired the brand and launched Charatan pipe tobaccos, which were a success. And in the early 21st century, Charatan cigars came on the market. These cigars were blended specifically to the preferences of the British cigar smokers. The brand quickly became the best selling new world cigar in the United Kingdom.


Fast forward, 2 years ago, the British tobacco distributor Tor Imports acquired the brand. The production was moved to Joya de Nicaragua and the blend was tweaked to attract a new generation of cigar smokers. Ministry of Cigars reviewed the new blend last year. Tor Imports also released a limited edition to commemorate the ownership. The Charatan Colina. And that name has a meaning. Colina means hill. Tor means hill. Add that Tor Imports is located on top of a hill in Devon, U.K., and you will see the significance of the name. The cigar is made in one size only, 5½x52, in limited production. The filler is all Nicaraguan. The binder and wrapper are Indonesian. Besuki for the binder, and shade-grown tobacco from Java as a wrapper.


The wrapper is dark for a shade-grown wrapper. The ring looks very much like a Davidoff ring, white with golden dots, but not as high quality as Davidoff. The logo has a unicorn, which embodies the craft and heritage of Charatan. It is a symbol of mythology, individuality, and as the national animal of Scotland – of quintessential Britishness. The wrapper is dark, Colorado Maduro colored with beautiful smudges. The triple cap is gorgeous, and the cigar feels well constructed. The cigar has a strong aroma. Green spices, stock cubes, that kind of aroma.


The cold draw is great. And once lit, the cigar is earthy, spicy with a little salt. The cigar remains slightly salty, with herbal flavors, a little coffee, and soil. There is a little bit of grass and sweetness too, that show up in the retrohale. The flavors are smooth, mellow, and balanced. The cigar slowly develops more of a spice flavor palate. Nutmeg, cinnamon, allspice., but with some earthiness, leather, and pepper. The sweetness becomes stronger, with a citrus sourness. There is also a slight nuttiness. The cigar gets more character, without losing the smoothness. More dry flavors, such as hay and dried wood. But still with the pepper, the spices, and the nuttiness. The final third starts sweet with nuts, pepper, and spices. The sweetness is like liquid sugar. The sweetness slowly evolves to marzipan though. With nuts, spices, pepper, leather, and wood.


The draw is great. The ash is like a stack of white and gray dimes. The smoke is good, blueish, and decent in volume and thickness. The burn is quite straight and slow. The cigar starts smooth, mellow, and well balanced but lacks character at first. That character shows up later, without losing the balance and smoothness. This is a medium-bodied cigar, medium-full flavored with an interesting evolution. The smoke time is three hours

Would I buy this cigar again? I want a box
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Categories: 92, Charatan, Fabrica de Tabacos Joya de Nicaragua, Nicaraguan cigars | Tags: , , , ,

Kristoff GC Signature Series Robusto

Kristoff GC Signature Series Robusto. Glen Case hit a mid-life crisis in the early 2000s and wanted to do something else than the financial services he provided for close to 20 years. As an avid cigar aficionado, he pursued a dream of becoming a cigar brand owner. And he did. In 2004 he founded Kristoff cigars, named after his son Christopher. After doing his homework, Case settled for the Charles Fairmorn factory in the Dominican Republic as his manufacturing partner. And now, 16 years later, the Kristoff cigars are sold in every corner of the world. And praised by cigar magazines and cigar blogs for years.


The Kristoff GC Signature Series was released mid-2011 at the IPCPR Trade Show. The blend was created for the cigar smoker with a well-educated palate and who likes a full-bodied cigar. To create a blend with notes that would entice these experienced, demanding smokers Case and the blenders used a Brazilian Maduro wrapper. For the binder, they took a Dominican leaf. The filler consists of all Cuban seed tobacco, from Nicaragua, Honduras, and the Dominican Republic. The robusto that we are reviewing measures 5½x54.


Kristoff cigars always look cool. The pigtail and closed foot are always bonus points for looks. The thick, dark and oily Brazilian Maduro wrapper isn’t the cleanest looking wrapper ever. But for a Brazilian wrapper, it looks good. And it looks very tasty. The ring is quite simple, yet the embossing and that the red on the front fades to back make it stand out. The cigar feels well made. The aroma is divine, dark chocolate with a little spice although the aroma could be a bit stronger.


The cold draw is always an issue with closed footed cigars. But once lit, that issue is solved. Pepper with espresso, strong, in your face. The flavors then turn a bit more to wood and dry leather. But the dark chocolate that was promised shows up too. As always with a closed foot, the start of the cigar is a little rough, it’s hard to get the burn going. The retrohale gives notes of dried fruit. Dark chocolate is the main attraction, with spice, coffee, wood, and dried fruit as support. After a third, there’s still dark chocolate with creamy, thick sweetness, leather, wood, and mild black pepper. But there is also a salty flavor. The dark chocolate and dried fruit are the baselines, with a growing pepper flavor. There’s also more sweetness and a little citrus. The chocolate flavor is thick, it’s like slowly melting a piece of 70% dark chocolate in your mouth. It coats the whole palate. The final third still has that dark chocolate with dried fruit. But there is also pepper, spice, leather, and an earthy flavor. The chocolate remains the strongest flavor, yet the pepper grows. And there is still some wood as well. Near the end, a nut flavor shows up as well, while the pepper mellows out. Hazelnuts to be precise.


The draw is great, after a rocky start. But that rocky start is normal with a closed foot. The burn is good. The white ash is quite firm. The smoke is sufficient, but it would be nicer if the smoke was thicker. The cigar is balanced yet a little rough around the edges. In a good way, it’s not smooth. But it shows character with balance, and that’s always good. The flavors are both in your face, yet with subtle flavors beyond the baseline flavors. That makes the cigar intriguing. The smoke time is two hours and forty-five minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? I want boxes!
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Categories: 92, Charles Fairmorn, Dominican cigars, Kristoff | Tags: , , , ,

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