Posts Tagged With: 92

El Coyote Robusto

El Coyote Robusto. A cigar that appeared in December of 2019. First only in Belgium and Luxemburg, but the cigars are slowly available in more markets such as The Netherlands and Switzerland. The Belux importer and distributor, Central American Trading is the owner of the brand. And the cigar is the work of three people, Abe Flores, Marc D’Argembeau, and Phillipe van Wilderode.

D’Argembeau is de founder of CAT, but Van Wilderode is the owner for a few years. D’Argembeau’s logistical company is the worldwide distributor for Flores’s cigars. The trio created a three-size line with Nicaraguan filler and binder. The wrapper comes from an undisclosed country “which has become a must for quality wrappers” according to El Coyote cigars. That could be Ecuador, Mexico, Honduras, Nicaragua, or the Dominican Republic. The robusto for this review measures 5½x54.

This is a sexy-looking cigar, an intense colored wrapper, not extremely dark but the wrapper looks rich and oily. The band is stylish, gray with a silhouette of ‘El Coyote’ Phillipe van Wilderode in black, and the name in copper print. The cigar feels solid and has a nice triple cap. The cigar has an unusual aroma, strong green herbs such as lovage and parsley.

The cold draw is fine, quite dry with raw spicy tobacco as the flavor. And a little pepper on the lips. The cigar has a nice dark spice flavor, with cedar and nuts. There is a thick, creamy, dark sugar sweetness. Almost like almond paste, but with some dark sugar as a supplement. There are still dark spices, and the mouthfeel slowly becomes dry again. A little leather is a reason for the dry feel. Near the end of the first third, the cigar gives pepper. The second third starts with the almond paste again, with oak, leather, and a bit of soil. The paste flavor makes it quite a unique smoke. The retrohale is pleasant with some mild spices. The dark spices, wood, and pepper make a wonderful combination. There is balance. At the end of the second third, there is hay with pepper. In the end, it’s wood with pepper and a minty freshness. And peanuts, a surprising flavor.

The smoke is very nice, thick, white, and plenty in volume. The ash is light in color and a little frayed. The burn is nice. Straight and slow. The construction is good. This is a medium cigar in body but full in flavor with plenty of evolution. The smoke time is two and a half hours.

Would I buy this cigar again? Most definitely

Categories: 92, Dominican cigars, El Coyote, PDR Cigars | Tags: , , , , | Leave a comment

Flor de Las Antillas Maduro Short Robusto.

Flor de Las Antillas Maduro Short Robusto. In 2012, My Father Cigars won the Cigar Aficionado top 25 with the Flor de Las Antillas Toro. Winning that award boosts sales, but because of the quality, the cigar remains popular until today. But as with most successful cigars, there will be offspring. Either in new sizes or a similar blend with a different wrapper. For a new Flor de Las Antillas, My Father Cigars chose to go with a Maduro one.

So in 2016, a new line appeared. The Flor de Las Antillas Maduro, with several box-pressed cigars. The filler and binder remain Nicaraguan, with tobaccos from the family farms. The wrapper is an Ecuadorian Habano Sun Grown Oscuro. Of all the sizes, we picked the 4½x50 Short Robusto to review. And to be honest, since we love the regular blend so much, we never smoked the Maduro before if presented with a choice.

The box press looks good on this dark, leathery, and oily wrapper. It is quite even in color and there is one vein running on the side of the cigar. The ring does not differ from the prize-winning Flor de Las Antillas, yet there is a secondary band that reveals this is the Maduro version. But even without the ring, the color of the wrapper would reveal that. The foot of the ring is protected by a maroon piece of cloth. This cigar is strong when it comes to aroma. The moment it’s unwrapped from its cellophane coat, a strong smell of manure and fermenting grass hits the nose. And even though that does not sound appealing, the aroma is actually quite nice and comforting.

The cold draw is fine, with both a sweet and savory flavor. Once lit there is a distinct flavor of dark chocolate, but with raw wood, spices, leather, and soil. It bites a bit in the back of the throat. After a few puffs it mellows down and the bite is gone. Dark chocolate is still the strongest flavor with some pepper and wood. The Maduro sweetness joins in and the mouthfeel is a bit creamy. The cigar now tastes like cake with wood, soil, and pepper. Unique, something never experienced before. The second third starts off with oak and hay. There is still a hint of dark chocolate. And a dry grassy flavor. The cigar has balance and a nice Maduro sweetness. A little walnut flavor joins halfway, with more white pepper. In the final third, the cigar becomes stronger with more pepper. A lot of pepper, the kind of pepper Don Pepin was famous for in his early American & Nicaraguan years. With a nice sweetness of dried fruits. Wood also becomes stronger. Oak to be more precise. But still with a hefty dose of pepper and licorice.

The draw is great. The ash is white and dense. The cigar produces plenty of smoke. The burn is decent. It is a medium to medium-plus cigar in body, medium-plus in flavor as well. The smoke time is long, two hours and forty-five minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? It is a nice cigar but the regular Flor de Las Antillas is better IMHO.

Categories: 92, Flor de las Antillas, My Father Cigars, Nicaraguan cigars | Tags: , , , , | Leave a comment

Oliva Serie V Melanio Edicion Limitada 2020

Oliva Serie V Melanio Edicion Limitada 2020. For the 4th year in succession, Oliva released a limited edition Oliva Serie V Melanio. According to the story, round versions of the normally box-pressed cigars have been aging in the factory for years. And every year, Oliva is releasing a new vitola. It started with the Double Toro, then the Robusto, Diadema, and now the 6×54 Toro. Only 3000 boxes of ten cigars are available globally.

The blend is exactly the same as the regular production Oliva Serie V Melanio. That means an Ecuadorian Sumatra wrapper over Nicaraguan binder and filler. The only difference is that this cigar doesn’t get the box-press treatment and remains a round cigar. Although, to me, it looks like this cigar was rolled specifically for a special release as there is no 6×54 vitola in the regular production series.

The cigar looks good. The Ecuadorian wrapper is nice, evenly colored, and feels silky. It’s got enough oil. The color of the wrapper fits perfectly with the brown, red, and gold rings on the cigar. The red cloth band with the glossy golden 2020 on the foot pops. The triple cap is pretty. There are no hard nor soft spots noticeable in the cigar. The aroma is strong, raw tobacco and barnyard.

The cold draw is fine, quite spicy to taste with a little hazelnut as well. Once lit, it’s black pepper with dark roast coffee and an earthy flavor. A dried berry sweetness appears. There is also a lemon-like freshness. The berry flavor and lemon acidity remain, but there is a nice dose of white pepper as well. The spice, sweetness, and acidity keep each other well balanced. The second third still has that peppery yet sweet blackberry flavor, but now with toasted nuts, leather, coffee, and soil. The flavors are complex yet there is a nice, delicate balance. A mild hint of dark chocolate shows up halfway through the cigar. The mouthfeel is quite creamy. The berry sweetness is quite constant though out the cigar. The final third has oak, berry, and pepper with leather.

The draw is phenomenal. The light ash is dense and firm like a stack of quarters. The burn is fantastic too. The smoke is decent in volume and thickness. This is a full-bodied, full-flavored cigar. The smoke time is two hours and fifteen minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? Yes

Categories: 92, Nicaraguan cigars, Oliva, Tabacalera Oliva | Tags: , , , , ,

Perdomo ESV Maduro Imperio

Perdomo ESV Maduro Imperio. Where the ESV stands for Estate Seleccion Vintage. Only the top 5 percent tobacco of Perdomo’s Finca Natalie is selected for the ESV series. Up until 2019, the ESV was a limited edition with releases in 2005 and 2016, but now it’s a regular production cigar although in small quantities due to limitations to the tobacco.

The regular production version is box-pressed instead of round. It is an all Nicaraguan cigar. The binder and filler are from Cuban seed tobaccos. The wrapper is a Nicaraguan Maduro. The imperio measures 6×54. I did a review of the ESV Sun Grown last year, that one scored a 92.

This cigar is a looker. A smooth, very dark, Maduro wrapper without any ugly veins. An almost metallic blueish gray ring with black and gold, very stylish. The Perdomo estate is pictured on the ring. The box press look works really well on this cigar. To the touch, this cigar feels very good with the right amount of bounce. And the aroma is strong, very strong. Oak, hay, and soil.

The cold draw is fine. A strong, spicy hay flavor is what comes to mind. The cigar starts with leather, earth, but mostly a slightly acidic and bitter dark roast coffee flavor. A good kind of bitter though. There is a hint of red pepper as well. The cigar turns dark and earthy, with a classic Maduro sweetness. Towards the second third, leather and a hint of dark chocolate join the earthy, peppery flavors. Even though the flavors are on the darker side of the flavor wheel, the cigar is creamy. With some nuts as well. The cigar slowly gets lighter in taste, not in strength or flavor, but on the flavor wheel. More chocolate, cream plus citrus acidity. Slowly leather shows up as well. The Maduro wrapper keeps releasing a subtle sweetness. The base flavor is earthiness with that Maduro sweetness, but with some black pepper to remaining interesting. The finale has a nice nutty flavor, with pepper, soil, and sweetness.

The draw is great. The ash is almost white and Nick Perdomo once told us that it’s because of the potassium in the soil. The burn is immaculate. Slow and steady, straight as can be. There is a good amount of smoke coming from the cigar. This is a full-body, full flavor cigar. The smoke time is two hours and forty-five minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? I prefer the Sun Grown.

Categories: 92, Nicaraguan cigars, Perdomo, Tabacalera Perdomo | Tags: , , , ,

EPC Pledge Prequel

EPC Pledge Prequel. A little over a year ago, a new cigar from Ernesto Perez Carrillo hit the market. The EPC Pledge. It is part of the Perez-Carrillo series, a series where the generations before Ernesto Perez Carrillo jr are honored. The other cigars in the series are the critically acclaimed Encore and La Historia. “With each sample of the six different blends for Pledge I worked on, I asked myself, ‘Is this cigar worthy to follow La Historia and Encore?” said Perez-Carrillo in a press release. “And I was very pleased when I found the one.”

The cigar comes from Perez-Carrillo’s factory in the Dominican Republic, La Alianza. For the blend, the cigar industry legend uses a Connecticut-grown Habano wrapper over an Ecuadorian binder. The filler is all Nicaraguan. For now, there are only two vitolas available. Those are the Prequel, a 5×50 Robusto, and the 6×52 Sojourn. The prequel became the #1 cigar of Cigar Aficionado’s Top 25 of 2020.

Let’s start with the box, deep blue with a beautiful tattoo style print. But when you open the box up is when the magic happens. The cigars, one row of ten pieces, lay on blue fabric, creating a very luxurious presentation. The cigars come in cellophane with a ‘cigar aficionado cigar of the year 2020, rated 98’ sticker on the foot. The foot ring is gold color fabric. Then there are two blue rings. The top one has different types of blue, with gold and white while the secondary ring mentions Perez Carrillo in clear white letters. Just in looks and packaging, this cigar looks great. The wrapper is oily, and Colorado Maduro in color. The oil gives it a shine like it’s lacquered. The cigar itself is a soft box-pressed with a fairly round head. It is leathery to the touch, but without noticeable plugs. The aroma is strong. Chocolate, barnyard, and the smell of horses.

The cold draw is fine. There is a mild spicy hay flavor with cinnamon. The first puffs are leathery and earthy. Those flavors remain for a while, but with some dark roast coffee and dark chocolate as supporting flavors. The chocolate turns more into cocoa, with a dry mouthfeel. And it gets stronger as well. There is an earthy flavor in the retrohale. Slowly some spice and pepper show up as well. The cocoa remains with some toast and a little bit of natural sweetness. The flavors so far would pair well with a dark stout, such as Guinness. Halfway the cigar gets too strong to retrohale pleasantly. There is still cocoa, pepper is growing and there is some acidity. The flavors are mild creamy. There is also some cedar and a spicy flavor that comes close to smoked paprika. There is a caramel-like sweetness in the aftertaste with a strong pepper, almost like chili padi, or bird’s eye chili as it’s called in the United States. But the chili isn’t overpowering, the rest of the flavors, especially the cocoa and earthiness keep it in check. There is a mild peanut flavor as well. A little more sweetness and acidity, with creaminess. Cocoa is the dominant flavor from start to finish. The peanut flavor gains some strength. The end is that earthiness again, with cocoa, peanuts, and green herbs.

The draw is great. And the natural oils in the wrapper make this cigar very smoky. Thick white smoke. The burn is straight. The ash is medium in color. It isn’t very firm, this isn’t a cigar for a long ash contest. This cigar is full in both body and flavor, with an intense start. The palate is quite unusual and you can taste that this cigar is made with well-aged tobacco. The smoke time is two hours and forty-five minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? Yes. Honestly, I am not the biggest fan of EPC cigars, but this one is very enjoyable.

Categories: 92, Dominican cigars, EPC, Tabacalera La Alianza | Tags: , , , , ,

ADVentura The Royal Return King’s Gold Robusto

ADVentura The Royal Return King’s Gold Robusto, a cigar from ADV & McKay Cigars. ADV & McKay Cigars are Henderson Ventura and Marcel Knobel. They came up with a beautiful story of an adventurer, ADVentura, and his companion McKay who set sail to the new world in 1490. And with every release, another chapter of that story is written. The Royal Return is the 4th chapter.

The Royal Return is available in two blends, Queen’s Pearls, and King’s Gold. The King’s Gold comes in a Robusto and a Toro, this is a review of the 5×52 Robusto. It is made with a Connecticut Broadleaf wrapper from the United States. The binder comes from San Andres, Mexico. And the filler comes from the United States, Nicaragua, and the Dominican Republic. Tabacalera William Ventura is responsible for making the cigars. ADVentura is also a sponsor of the Project Piece of Heart charity.

The thick and dark Connecticut Broadleaf wrapper is oily, greasy almost. The backside is beautifully marbled due to a thin, but visible vein. The band is not a paper band but a metal alloy. It is rare, but not unique. The Norwegian brand Viking and Chinook Cellars Terroir use something similar. But it is rare, and it looks great. It’s like an old, weathered seal including patina. The construction feels good with a pretty flat head. The aroma is strong, wood and spices. It’s like walking on a souk, past one of those spice stalls.

The cold draw is fine. It leaves both a salty and a sweet flavor on the lips, with spice on the tongue. After lighting there is a bitter and salty taste, burned nuts. But that is gone after three puffs, leaving a nice muddy clay flavor with pepper behind. It’s quite a spicy start. But then it mellows out, the spices and pepper are still there, with coffee and caramel. But much milder, calmer. Like when you enter the safe and calm harbor during a storm. The mouthfeel is even a little creamy. The clay flavor is quite unique. At the end of the first third, the sweetness turns to honey. The second third starts with wood and spices. There are also some nuts. Halfway the flavors are sweet wood with spices and cream. Very interesting, smooth, and completely in balance. The final third sees the return of soil, with wood and lingering pepper. The cigar feels hot in the last third.

The draw is fine. The smoke is thick and plentiful. The burn had to be corrected once or twice, but that was no surprise with such a thick and oily wrapper. The thickness of the wrapper also makes it a slow-burning cigar, it lasts long. The ash is white as snow. This cigar has balance and plenty of evolution. The smoke time is two hours and forty-five minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? It is quite interesting so yes, and I want to explore more ADVentura

Categories: Dominican cigars, 92, Tabacalera William Ventura, ADVentura | Tags: , , ,

Aging Room Quattro Nicaragua Maestro

Aging Room Quattro Nicaragua Maestro. The Cigar Aficionado Cigar of the Year 2019. Many of my followers praise this cigar on Instagram, Facebook, and other social media accounts. So it’s time for me to review this cigar as well. To see if it lives up to the hype. A 96 score isn’t very common, so our expectations are high.

A.J. Fernandez is responsible for the production. But Aging Room is a creating of Rafael Nodal, who’s now the head of product capability of Altadis U.S.A. But before that, he was the owner of Boutique Blends and that was or is the umbrella for Aging Room. This Aging Room blend is a Nicaraguan puro.

The cigar looks great. A dark and oily wrapper. Smooth yet impressive. With a beautiful black, gold, and white ring. The secondary ring pops with its bright orange and gold. This cigar screams “pick me, you won’t regret it”. The box-press is flawless and the cigar feels well constructed. The cigar has a thick and strong barnyard aroma.

The cold draw is flawless. The flavor is spice and pepper. The first puffs are earthy, with black dark roast coffee and pepper. Lots of pepper. Soon some wood and leather join the earthy and spice flavors of the cigar. There’s also a dry nutty flavor in the profile. After a third, there is black pepper, sweetness, earthiness. Some toast and roasted coffee beans show up as well. Even though it’s a strong cigar, the flavors are round. There is not mean harshness. The pepper is growing in strength. All flavors are tied together with some citrus acidity. Near the end the pepper really becomes powerful.

The draw is flawless. The ash is salt and pepper colored. But it breaks easy. The burn is straight. The smoke is good, thick enough and full enough. This cigar is a full-body cigar, full flavor yet with plenty of balance. The smoke time is two hours and ten minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? Yes, I want a box

Categories: 92, Aging Room, Nicaraguan cigars, Tabacalera A.J. Fernandez | Tags: , , , , , , , ,

Asylum Seven 11/18

Asylum Seven 11/18. In 2012, former Camacho owner Christian Eiroa came back to the cigar industry after finishing his non-competition clause that he had to sign upon selling Camacho to Davidoff. His comeback was a partnership with former Camacho and Davidoff sales rep Tom Lazuka. Asylum Cigars was a success from day one. To commemorate the 7th birthday of Asylum, the company released the Seven in 2019. Two sizes, limited to 1000 boxes of each size.

One of the sizes is the signature 11/18 size. Named after the birthday of Christian’s mother. It is a figurado, 6 inches long with a 48 ring foot and head. But in the center, the cigar is ring 54 thick. The blend is made of Honduran tobacco as the filler and binder with a Nicaraguan wrapper. The cigars come in single coffins. The CLE Cigar Factory is where the cigars are rolled.

If you don’t know the story of the shape of the cigar, you might think that the roller isn’t very good. But when you know the cigar should look thicker in the middle, it is intriguing. The wrapper is dark, leathery. The big ring, black with a golden skull is a bit dark and sinister. But the colors of the ring come back in the coffins tying it all together. The cigar has a strong aroma of dry wood.

The cold draw is fantastic. Spicy oak. Once lit, the cigar gives a strong coffee aroma with some sugar and spice. Cinnamon and pepper show up. There is a little bit of tongue burn on the tip of the tongue. Soil makes an entrance in the flavor profile as well. The cigar then turns to wood, with a little bit of pepper. Before the second third, the flavors change again. The wood remains, but now with soil, leather, coffee, pepper, and sweetness. The second third starts strong with spice, pepper but now with some chocolate as well. The chocolate gets stronger, with leather, soil, coffee plus some acidity, and sweetness. Earthiness returns and the flavors are beautifully round.

The cigar produces a lot of smoke. The ash is white and dense. The draw is fantastic. The burn is quite alright. This is a strong cigar, full of flavor. Powerful. The smoke time is two hours and thirty minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? It’s a great cigar but very expensive.

Categories: 92, Asylum, El Aladino, Honduran cigars | Tags: , , ,

Liga Privada Bauhaus

Liga Privada Bauhaus. Over the past few years, Drew Estate has done some exclusive releases for the European market. For example an Undercrown Shade vitola for the German John Aylesbury Group. And the original release of the Undercrown Maduro Flying Pig was a project for the Dutch group Compaenen. Both John Aylesbury and Compaenen are independent tobacconists combining buying power. But never has there been a European exclusive Liga Privada. Until now. Last December Drew Estate made an announcement. There would be a European exclusive Liga Privada Bauhaus. And it’s available now.

The Liga Privada Bauhaus gets its name from the architectural movement Bauhaus. The Short Robusto pays extra attention to leaf placement within the cigar. The blend takes the European cigar enthusiasts through a newly curated experience. The cigar measures 4½x50 and comes in elegant blue boxes of 12 cigars. The cigars use filler from Nicaragua and Honduras. The binder is bold Brazilian tobacco. The wrapper is a rich earthy Connecticut Broadleaf capa. The cigars come from the rolling tables of the Gran Fabrica Drew Estate in Esteli, Nicaragua.

As all Liga Privada cigars, this is a looker. A stunning black and oily wrapper with character due to the fine veins that run over the leaf. The classic white, gray, and gold band form a beautiful contrast. The Bauhaus name is printed big on the ring. The triple cap is beautiful. The relatively small size fits the look. The construction feels good. The aroma is surprisingly fresh. Fresh wood, floral, and herbal, almost lavender-like.

The cold draw is a little on the easy side. The flavors in the cold draw are floral with a nice spicy kick. From the get-go, this cigar is peppery, sweet, earthy with some leather. It’s in your face immediately, aggressive but in a good way. Almost instantly toast and wood join the previously mentioned flavors. There’s also some coffee. Complex, many strong flavors are battling in the mouth. After the first centimeter, the cigar mellows out a bit without losing its strength. The flavors calm down with spice, nuts, soil, wood, and leather now more in balance. Slowly dark roast coffee takes the spot for the most dominant flavor. Halfway there is more wood with the dark roast coffee. Yet there is also a dry grassy flavor with spice and sweetness. Some puffs later a slightly acidic flavor shows up as well.

The draw is fine. And the air purifier is always working overtime when smoking a cigar from Drew Estate. The burn is nice and straight. The ash is fine when it comes to firmness, yet the color is yellowish-brown. This cigar is full of body and strength. The smoke time is two hours.

Would I buy this cigar again? I can buy bigger Liga Privada cigars for less, so I don’t think so

Categories: 92, Gran Fabrica Drew Estate, Liga Privada, Nicaraguan cigars | Tags: , , , ,

Plasencia Year of the Ox

Plasencia Year of the Ox. This year Plasencia is one of the many brands that jump on the Chinese Zodiac Calendar bandwagon. And it’s the first time that the Nicaraguan cigar mogul does it. It’s been only a few years since Plasencia made the call to create cigars with the family name, but with their knowledge, background, and reputation they were able to secure a good portion of the market. And this year they want some of the Asian market as well.

From the moment the press release of this cigar came out, I was intrigued. Not because of the story behind the cigar, but because of the €35 price. Yes, there are more expensive cigars. We even reviewed more expensive cigars. But all those cigars had something that justified the price. Vintage tobacco or rare tobacco for example. There is nothing in the press release or information that justifies this price, so there’s only one way to find out if this cigar is worth it. One thing is for sure, you’re getting a lot of Nicaraguan tobacco in this 7×58 Figurado.

The looks are impressive, a 7×58 Figurado is always a head-turner. The milk-chocolate brown wrapper is oily and smooth. There are three rings, all with the same red and gold color scheme. Red and gold are important colors that stand for wealth in Chinese culture. The shape is immaculate. The aroma is surprisingly mild, just some wood and hay. Lack of cellophane around the cigar did cause some damage during transport on the head and the foot.

The cold draw is fine despite the damage on both samples smoked. Wood, sultanas, and raw tobacco are the flavors in the cold draw. The first flavor is cedar, with a lot of pepper and some caramel. The sweetness then turns more to a marshmallow sweetness with mild spices like cumin in the retrohale. There is also some toast and vanilla, with a bit of white pepper. Mellow, balanced, sweet but mostly interesting. The cumin flavor gets a little stronger. Ceder slowly shows up. The sweetness turns more to molasses, with more cedar, spices, and a bit of white pepper. There is a hint of old book flavor that is classic of Connecticut Shade tobacco. But it is very mild. Around halfway there are baking spices, like gingerbread spices, but still with sweetness. There is also a little bit of leather. The flavor profile is quite unique. The sweetness is consistent, different kinds of sweetness but overall a constantly sweet cigar. Natural sweetness and very pleasant. In the final third there’s more leather, cedar, spices, and pepper. Even till the final puffs, it’s easy to retrohale the cigar. The very last few puffs have dark chocolate and mocha with pepper and cedar. But the mocha is fantastic.

The draw is great. The light gray ash is a bit coarse but seems to hold on nicely. The burning cigar has a nice toasty aroma to it. There are some issues with the burn. It had to be touched up a few times. The smoke is nice and thick. This cigar is balanced, smooth, and very tasteful. Medium in strength, full in flavor. It is a great smoke, high-end for sure. Does it justify the high price tag? Partially yes as it is a unique cigar with tremendous tobacco. The smoke time is three hours.

Would I buy this cigar again? I loved it, but €35 is a lot of money.

Categories: 92, Nicaraguan cigars, Plasencia, Tabacalera del Oriente | Tags: , , ,

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