Posts Tagged With: 93

Black Works Studio Killer Bee Green Hornet

Black Works Studio Killer Bee Green Hornet. In 2016, James and Angela Brown made the Black Works Studio Killer Bee Green Hornet a regular production cigar. Before it was only available as an event-only cigar. Black Works Studio is the experimental sister of Black Label Trading Company, owned by the Browns.

The cigar measures 5×48 and is the bigger brother of the Killer Bee. The filler and binder are Nicaraguan. But the wrapper is the star of the show. Ecuadorian Maduro with little pieces of Ecuadorian Candela. Not in a barber pole style, but a thin swirl at the head and a closed candela foot. The cigars come from Nicaragua, from the factory that the Browns own: Oveja Negra.

This cigar is killer, not just in the name but in looks as well. A beautiful oily Maduro wrapper, and then three thin candela lines in the head. The last half centimeter of the foot is candela as well. It is a closed foot. The black ring has fading green letters and fits perfectly. This is one of the best-looking cigars in ages. The head is beautifully rounded. The cigar has a nice aroma of hay and sawdust.

There is nothing to say about the cold draw. Because of the closed foot, there is virtually no draw at all. But the head of the cigar leaves some pepper and spice on the tip of the tongue. Once lit its grass. No surprise as that is the characteristic of candela. There’s also some coffee with a hint of sweetness. Once the candela is gone, it’s dark chocolate. Dark chocolate with soil and pepper. At the end of the first third, there’s also some citrus and leather with the coffee, soil, and white pepper. The second third has some wood, leather, soil, dark roast coffee, spice, and sweetness. The flavors are balanced, with the right amount of aggression. It’s not smooth, but also not rough. The sweetness is of dried fruits. The final third has more toast and leather. The mouthfeel becomes dry. Dark chocolate and some spice remain as well. The pepper grows a bit in strength.

The cigar gives a lot of smoke, straight from the start. The draw is great. The ash is light gray and reasonably firm. The burn is straight. It is a medium to full cigar in body. The flavor is medium in strength. The smoke time is one hour and forty-five minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? I enjoyed it thoroughly so yes.

Categories: 93, Black Label Trading Company, Nicaraguan cigars, Oveja Negra | Tags: , , , , , ,

Muestra de Saka Unstolen Valor

Muestra de Saka Unstolen Valor. We feel that Steve Saka doesn’t need any introduction. The first cigar blogger back in the day, then a consultant for JR Cigars. Former CEO of Drew Estate, where he changed the course of the company from infused cigars to a hugely successful portfolio of traditional cigars as well. And since 2015 owner of Dunbarton Tobacco and Trust, his own company. With fantastic blends, several of whom ended up in the Ministry of Cigars top 25 of 2019 and 2020.

The Muestra de Saka line is a selection of unique blends and vitolas. The 2020 Muestra de Saka release is different than other years though. Why? Well, it is the blender. Where all Dunbarton Tobacco & Trust blends are from the capable hands of master blender Saka himself, this cigar is the vision and skill of Raul Disla. Disla is the factory manager of NACSA, one of the two factories that make cigars for DTT. This blend of Nicaraguan cigars is so good that Saka deems it worthy to carry the Saka name. And to give credit where credit is due, the name is unstolen valor. Unstolen, because Disla gets all the credit, Steve Saka isn’t shy telling people that this is a Disla blend.

The wrapper on this cigar is stunning. Dark, oily, no thick veins, just a beautifully almost lacquered wrapper leaf with thin veins. Like the skin of an African goddess. The lack of a ring makes the appearance of the wrapper even more noticeable. The only ring on the cigar is a bright yellow cloth ring on the foot with Muestra de Saka and Unstolen Valor printed. The cap is perfect, and the cigar feels evenly filled. The aroma is strong, barnyard, hay, and moist soil.

The cold draw is a bit loose but flavorful. A spice bomb. Once lit it’s a spice bomb too, pepper, herbs, but with coffee, and soil. Full, in your face as only Nicaraguan cigars, can be. After a few puffs, the initial blow is over. The flavors are still there, but with more nuance now. It’s then when some wood and sweetness make an appearance. The cigar then becomes woodier, with leather, herbs, and cocoa. The leather slowly takes control, with pepper as its lieutenant. And where the cigar was in your face at the beginning, it’s subtle and nuanced now. Yet without losing any of its strength. The pepper mellows out, the cigar is now all about leather and wood, with a tiny supporting role for earthiness and cocoa. The rest of the first third is a beautiful mixture of leather, cocoa, wood, earthiness, with just enough spice and pepper to keep it very interesting. The leather gains strength, thick, dark leather. There is a faint vanilla flavor. The final third has a lingering metallic flavor, and wood takes over from leather. There are some spices, but the most predominant spice is pepper.
The cigar ends as it started, strong, bold, in your face with coffee, earthiness, and a lot of pepper.

The draw is fantastic. The ash is like a stack of dimes. And a good, stable stack as well. The burn is straight and slow. The smoke is decent, quite thick and full but not Drew Estate style smoke. This is a full-body cigar, full of flavor too. The smoke time is three hours and twenty minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? Yes

Categories: 93, Muestra de Saka, Nicaragua American Cigars S.A., Nicaraguan cigars | Tags: , , , , , ,

The T Toro Grande

The T Toro Grande. Collaborations in the cigar industry are not uncommon. Balmoral with La Flor Dominicana and Ernesto Perez Carrillo for example. Or Drew Estate with Robert Caldwell. A.J. Fernandez with Altadis. The list is too long to write down. But a collaboration between three cigar makers? That’s unique. That’s what The T is though. A collaboration between Robert Caldwell, A.J. Fernandez, and Matt Booth.

Room 101 and Caldwell Cigars don’t own their own factories. Caldwell mainly uses Tabacalera William Ventura, where is using several factories after parting ways with Davidoff. Abdel Fernandez owns one of the most famous, and largest, factories in Esteli, Nicaragua. So it’s pretty logical that the cigars are made there. All the tobacco in this cigar comes from Nicaragua, making this cigar a puro. The Toro Grande from this review measures 6½x56 but other sizes are available as well.

The cigar looks good. An evenly Colorado Maduro colored wrapper with a little tooth. Dry but good looking. The main cigar band is gray with three different old keys on it, and a golden print saying The T. The secondary ring is thin. Olive green in colors with the initials of the makers. The box-pressed cigar feels well constructed. There is a barnyard aroma coming from the cigar, medium in strength.

The cold draw is all about leather with some pepper. It’s a smooth cold draw though. Once lit, the leather is still there but with a nice sugary sweetness. The retrohale also reveals some cedar. There are hints of soil, coffee, and pepper. The flavors are intense, complex and full of nuances. This isn’t a powerhouse as you would expect from a Nicaraguan Puro. This is a cigar with balance and character. The wood flavor is getting stronger, and there are some dark spices. The complexity and smoothness don’t change. The flavors are getting even more intense. Licorice, cedar, leather, green herbs, and a little bit of pepper. There is also faint saltiness. Wood gains strength with leather as a backup. A faint coffee is on the background with green herbs and spices. The sweetness disappears. The finale has a little more pepper.

The ash is light colored but not firm. It dropped on the desk pretty early into the cigar. The draw is fantastic and the burn is good. The smoke is thick and full. This cigar is well balanced. Medium to full in body and full in flavor. Extremely complex and balanced. Because of the shape, it does not feel like a ring 56. The smoke time is two and a half hours.

Would I buy this cigar again? Yes, love this smoke.

Categories: 93, Nicaraguan cigars, Tabacalera A.J. Fernandez, The T | Tags: , , , , ,

Muestra de Saka Nacatamale

Muestra de Saka Nacatamale. A beautiful 6×48 Gran Corona from Dunbarton Tobacco & Trust. And if that name doesn’t ring a bell, Steve Saka will probably do. If Steve Saka doesn’t ring a bell, then you seriously need to upgrade your cigar knowledge. Saka was the first cigar blogger. Then he became a marketing consultant for J.R. Cigars, CEO for Drew Estate, and for a few years, he’s the owner, blender, and the face of Dunbarton Tobacco & Trust.

This Muestra de Saka Nacatamale is the second cigar in the Muestra de Saka line. And the first regular production, as the inaugural cigar was a limited edition. Named after a traditional Nicaraguan dish. It’s not the last time that Saka named a cigar after food though. The filler tobacco is all from one farm in Jalapa, Esteli. Add a Nicaraguan binder and an Ecuadorian Habano wrapper and you have the ingredients for this cigar. Made in Esteli, at Joya de Nicaragua. This cigar was a gift from Puros Asia, the Malaysian distributor for Dunbarton Tobacco & Trust.

The first thing that catches the eye, after it’s taken out of the coffin, is the lack of a cigar ring. The Muestra de Saka Nacatamale has a cloth foot ring. Include the coffin, and this is something that stands out in a humidor. Fluorescent yellow with red letters spelling Muestra de Saka, and black letters Nacatamale printed over the red letters. The wrapper is oily, yet has some veins. The dark color isn’t even everywhere, it’s lighter around the veins. But that makes this cigar intriguing. The cap has a little tail, but it’s no flag tail or pigtail. Just a little 2-millimeter tail. The construction feels fantastic. And the aroma is delicious, dark, spicy, and intense.

The cold draw is flawless with a spicy taste. Once it, it’s dark roast coffee with some red chili and sweetness. The flavors turn to grassy, nutty, spicy, and leathery. There is an earthy cinnamon flavor with some pepper, well blended and balanced. The coffee returns, and there is slight dark chocolate. The retrohale has a mildly sweet and mild spice flavor, close to nutmeg. The second third starts earthy with coffee. The smooth spices, with a little pepper, dominate the cigar. There is also some earthy chocolate. The final third has dark flavors, some oak, leather, spices, some black pepper. There is also a hint of sweetness and freshness. The oak gets stronger, with roasted tones. Roasted coffee returns as well. The finale has a little more black pepper.

The draw is fantastic. The smoke is almost Drew Estate like. Thick, full, white, and plentiful. The light-colored, almost white, ash breaks easily though. It’s so well balanced and so smooth that it doesn’t feel like a medium to a full-bodied cigar. But it is though, and it’s also full-flavored. The smoke time is two hours and forty minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? Hell yeah

Categories: 93, Fabrica de Tabacos Joya de Nicaragua, Muestra de Saka, Nicaraguan cigars | Tags: , , , , , ,

Oscar Superfly Maduro Super Corona

Oscar Superfly Maduro Super Corona. In 2019, Oscar Valladares released the Super Fly Maduro. A cigar inspired by the 1970s in style. Funky colors, bigger than life. A bold smoke, that came in a velvet lined box to further enhance that pimp look and feel of the line. Earlier this year, Oscar released another Super Fly line, with a Connecticut Shade wrapper.

Valladares says this is the strongest cigar he makes. It’s the first time he used Dominican tobacco in one of his blends. The wrapper comes from San Andres in Mexico. The binder is Honduran. The filler comes from Honduras, Nicaragua, and the Dominican Republic. Canteros, the New Zealand distributor for Oscar, sponsored Ministry of Cigars with this cigar. This is the 5¼x45 Super Corona. Other sizes available are 6×54 Super Toro and the 6½x60 Super Gordo

The cigar looks great. A very dark wrapper, slightly dry and leathery is the perfect match for the funky ring. The ring breathes 1970s funk and pimp. An unusual shape, shiny purple, and gold, typography from that era. This is a cigar to smoke while watching Shaft or any other blaxploitation movie from the 1970s. Or Jackie Brown, which is Tarantino’s tribute of blaxploitation. The cigar feels well constructed. The aroma is strong and woody.

The cold draw is flawless and releases some brown spices in the flavor profile. Dry spices, dry wood, and a mild cocoa flavor are the flavors that start the cigar. The cigar turns more to a dark chocolate flavor profile. With brown spices as supporting flavor. Some sugar sweetness shows up as well. With a hint of leather over the chocolate, earthiness, and wood. Wood, sweetness, and brown spices are the main flavors. After a third, the cigar is too strong to retrohale. The pepper in the nose is too strong. The wood and leather get more pronounced, the sweetness fades away. A little citrus acidity shows up to balance all flavors out.

The draw is great. The ash is as white as snow. The smoke is thick and plentiful. The burn is straight as an arrow. The cigar is medium-full bodied, medium-full flavored. To stay in the 70s mood, this cigar is dy-no-mite! It’s groovy, or the bomb. The smoke time is two hours.

Would I buy this cigar again? This cigar is so groovy, I want more.

Categories: 93, Honduran cigars, Leaf by Oscar, Oscar Valladares Tobacco Factory | Tags: , , , , ,

Hiram & Solomon Traveling Man Lancero

Hiram & Solomon Traveling Man Lancero. Like all names in the Hiram & Solomon portfolio, this cigar gets his name from the freemason world as well. The ‘traveling man’ name stems from the ancient masonry. Master masons were often required to move from job to job over long distances. And when in a new area, local masons or the local lodge would vouch for such a ‘traveling man’. Fouad Kashouty and George Dakrat use the Plasencia Cigars factory in Esteli, Nicaragua for all the Hiram & Solomon lines. That includes this traveling man, the online Hiram & Solomon line with a Lancero in the line-up

This blend is made with tobaccos from four countries. The wrapper and binder are from South East Asia. From Indonesia. And if you want to get even more precise, from Sumatra where the Dutch introduced tobacco over four centuries ago. And later, the Sumatra seeds would be introduced into Cameroon to become the legendary Cameroon tobacco. The filler comes from the Dominican Republic and Brazil. Arapiraca from Brazil is used. Habano from Nicaragua is the last component in the blend. The Nicaraguan tobacco comes from Jalapa near the Honduran border and the volcanic island of Ometepe. The lancero is 7×38, but last year I reviewed the 6×60 Gran Toro.

Just because of the vitola, this cigar looks elegant. Skinny, long, a lancero is always beautiful. Add a purple, silver, and black ring and you have a cigar that stands out. The wrapper is a Colorado colored Indonesian Sumatra wrapper. To the eye and the touch, the wrapper is dry. The veins are thin. The cigar feels well constructed. The aroma is of charred wood, medium in strength.

The cold draw is a bit tight. It leaves a spicy raw tobacco flavor on top of the palate. Once lit, the cigar releases sweetness, floral notes, and cedar. There is also some spice. The spice slowly gets stronger. Nutmeg and a little pepper, but all covered in a very nice sweetness. Slowly leather and soil join the party, with the return of cedar. The floral flavors are still around. Everything is well balanced and smooth. At the end of the first third, there is also some chocolate. Milk chocolate to be more precise. With the leather, spice, and pepper. But all subtle. The second third also brings a faint vanilla flavor with a little freshness. A little later a fresh, green, grassy flavor is noticeable. The pepper gets a little stronger without overpowering the other flavors. It all remains very balanced and subtle.

The draw is very good. The length of the cigar cools the smoke down, making it very pleasant to smoke. The burn is straight. The ash is almost white. But due to the small ring gauge, the ash breaks easily. The cigar is smooth and balanced. The cigar has depth and nice complexity. The smoke time is two hours fifteen minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? I want a box or two boxes.

Categories: 93, Hiram & Solomon, Nicaraguan cigars, Tabacalera del Oriente | Tags: , , , ,

Tyrannical Buc Maduro Magnum 48

Tyrannical Buc Maduro Magnum 48 by Jas Sum Kral. Last year, Jas Sum Kral released a few new blends. The one that received most of the attention was the Nuggs. And of course, as Jas Sum Kral was the first premium cigar brand that came with a CBD infused cigar. The only way to create that cigar was to back-engineer the whole process. Spraying leaves with a CBD solution like some other others do result in low-quality cigars at a high price. So Jas Sum Kral hired an engineer and came up with a much better way. A way they patented, so nobody can copy it. But it took away a lot of the attention that this Jas Sum Kral Tyrannical Buc would have gotten otherwise. Named after Riste Ristevski’s nickname Riste Buc, this blend is a sleeper.


The Tyrannical Buc comes in several sizes. And in two blends, one with a Connecticut wrapper which Ministry of Cigars reviewed earlier. And it was smoked during a Philip & Ferdy Cigar show. But there is also a Maduro version. The blend is identical for both versions, except for the wrapper. The filler comes from Nicaragua and Pennsylvania, USA. The binder is Nicaraguan. And the Maduro version sports a Connecticut Broadleaf wrapper from the USA. For this review, we smoked the 4×48 Tyrannical Buc Maduro Magnum 48.

Ever since Jas Sum Kral was released, we have been amazed by its band. The details on the bands are amazing. And that’s why this Tyrannical Buc ring is such a letdown. The ring is simple, a little too simple to our taste. Just a white ring with a drawing of a T-Rex. Now the detail is nice. Jas Sum Kral means I am king, and the t-rex is wearing a crown. The dark wrapper is oily, veiny, and intimidating. Even though the cigar is less than a year old, the cellophane already started to discolor. The cigar feels well constructed. It has a strong smell of hay, barnyard, and some floral notes.


The cold draw is great. It releases a flavor sometimes found in liquor-filled bonbons. But then with hay as well, just as pepper. Straight from the start, the cigar gives dark chocolate, sweetness, hay, leather, earthiness, and pepper. The flavors are powerful, yet balanced and creamy. It evolves to wood with chocolate, pepper, spice, and leather. The second third brings more dry wood and hay. But there is still chocolate, leather, and earthiness. The cigar remains woody, with hay, chocolate, pepper, and sweetness. There are gingerbread spices in the retrohale.


The draw is good. Just like the firm ash. The burn is quite straight. The cigar releases a good amount of light blue smoke. The light-colored ash is firm. This is a medium-full to a full-bodied and full-flavored cigar. Balanced, smooth, powerful. This is a perfect example of how the same filler and binder with a different wrapper can be a completely different cigar. The smoke time is an hour and three quarters.

Would I buy this cigar again? Yes

number93

Categories: 93, Jas Sum Kral, Nicaraguan cigars, Tabacalera Aragon | Tags: , , , ,

Henk Maori Masterpiece

Henk Maori Masterpiece. Henk is a luxury brand, mostly focussed on suitcases and travel bags. But designer and owner Heiko Poerz is also an avid cigar smoker for over thirty years. With his eye for detail, his and his attitude to always go for the best, he was unhappy with the cigars that were on the market. Nothing reached perfection for his palate. So he asked his friend, master blender Didier Houvenaghel, for help to create a cigar that would be tailor-made for Poerz. Houvenaghel makes cigars at Tabacalera A.J. Fernandez, so automatically, Henk cigars would be made there as well. Houvenaghel and Poerz created a blend with vintage tobaccos. The tobacco is expensive, but since Poerz doesn’t compromise quality, he pushed on. His obsession with cigars also created a whole line of accessories, including the Cigarbone and the Minibone.


The Maori name is a tribute to a mutual friend of Poerz and Houvenaghel. The friend is Maori, and when the cigar was in the development stage, the three friends met up in Bali, Indonesia. Poerz jokingly mentioned that the wrapper had the same color as their friend’s skin. The line suddenly had a name, a tribute to their Maori friend. That resulted in a Maori style tattoo logo for the cigars, and names related to the Maori heritage such as the Haka. The Henk Maori Haka scored 94 and ended up on the 4th place of Ministry of Cigars Top 25 of 2019. The Henk Maori Masterpiece is a limited edition figurado. It measures 6½x64 and is made with vintage tobaccos from Nicaragua. The cigars were released in 2018, in very limited production. The cigars came in a travel humidor with 7 cigars, limited to 200 travel humidors. And 12 humidors with 52 cigars. There are also a limited number of refills and singles available.


The cigar looks amazing. The shape is fantastic, and the small pieces of Maduro wrapper on the foot and the head make the cigars pop. The unfinished head and the tattoo make this cigar stand out in any humidor. The wrapper is Colorado Maduro colored, dry and has some veins. Without the veins, the cigar would have hit 100 out of 100 points. It feels pretty packed but evenly packed. The dark manure smell is medium strong.


The cold draw is good. There is a hint of milk chocolate but also a lot of pepper in the cold draw. Straight from the start, there is coffee, slightly bitter but on a pleasant level. The draw is surprisingly good from the start. Usually, there is a bit of a tight draw until the burn reached the thicker part of the foot. There are herbal sweetness, pepper, and fresh leather flavors as well. The retrohale gives more spice and cedar. The cigar has a nutmeg and cinnamon sweetness. At the thickest part of the cigar, there is cedar, soil, pepper, and sugary sweetness. The cigar is very pleasant in the retrohale. Coffee and toast show up, still with the cedar, sweetness, pepper, and spices. The mouthfeel is creamy. The spices turn to gingerbread spices, with cedar, leather, sweetness, and pepper. The mouthfeel is still creamy. In the last third, the cigar picks up more strength. Retrohaling is no longer an option. Wood, leather, coffee, spices, and pepper are the main flavors.


The draw is amazing. The burn had to be corrected a few times though. There is a good amount of thick, white smoke. The ash is white and firm. This is a smooth, balanced, and flavorful cigar. But it packs strength too, even though it’s smooth and creamy. It is a full-bodied, full-flavored cigar. Balanced, smooth and full of character. The smoke time is three hours and twenty minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? For a very special occasion
number93

Categories: 93, Henk, Nicaraguan cigars, Tabacalera A.J. Fernandez | Tags: , , , , , , ,

Daniel Marshall by Carlos Fuente – XXXVIII Limited Edition

Daniel Marshall by Carlos Fuente – XXXVIII Limited Edition. Earlier this year, Daniel Marshall announced a very special limited edition for his 38th anniversary. A cigar made for him by no other than Carlito Fuente, to honor their decades’ long friendship. As Marshall said “Carlos and I grew up together from boys to men sharing similar values, commitment to quality and an unrelenting quest for the best. What joins us together, the golden thread that runs through our veins and drives us to live our dreams is a commitment to creativity in all we do a richness of character and generosity of spirit.” Fuente called making the cigar a great honor and thanked Marshall for the opportunity. The cigar will be sold at 38 locations worldwide and is already highly sought after.

The cigar is a Dominican puro, with all tobaccos grown at Chateau de La Fuente. Some of the tobacco is aged up to 12 years. Marshall and Fuente did not reveal how many cigars are released. The cigar is only available in a 6⅜x52 Torpedo and comes in exclusive Daniel Marshall travel humidors. The humidors can carry up to 20 cigars but come with 8 of these limited edition masterpieces. As Carlos Fuente said “What a huge honor and privilege this project has been for me. It was a calling of the heart for a special friendship that I have cherished and appreciated for long before most anyone reading this knew anything about cigars. Thank you Daniel Marshall for being who you are and have been consistently all these many, many years.” Ministry of Cigars will add a thank you to Daniel Marshall for sponsoring this unicorn.

The cigar has a smooth, Clara colored wrapper. Silky and delicate. The torpedo is semi box-pressed and feels evenly filled. The cigar has two rings, a white and gold primary ring, with Marshall’s signature. The secondary ring is gold, but unlike many limited-edition rings, this is not a copy from Habanos. It’s gold with black and has a row of dots but that’s where the similarities stop. The font is different, the letters aren’t black. This ring is embossed, and much more upscale than the Habanos rings. You can see the effort and love poured into the design. The aroma is strong, deep spices such as cumin mixed with a barnyard aroma. Very pleasant, complex, and promising.

The cold draw is perfect, with a smooth leather flavor. From the start, there is honey with a slight citrus acidity, smooth leather, and a little earthiness. Add a little red pepper on the lips and you’ll get the flavor of this cigar. The honey sweetness remains, with wood, earthiness, pepper, spices, and some salt. The flavors already show complexity. Slowly coffee shows up as well, with some citrus again. The honey sweetness remains, just like cedarwood and pepper. Slowly the flavors turn more to cedar with white pepper. There is still some sweetness and citrus though, but more on the background with some coffee. The cigar slowly turns to more of a coffee-flavored cigar. But the flavor changes are very nuanced, very smooth, and very complexed. There is some sweetness, yet it is no longer honey but more like cane sugar. In the final third, there’s pepper with a smooth silky milk chocolate. The flavors are so smooth that even in the last third, retrohaling is not an issue. Cedar shows up on the palate again. Still with the milk chocolate and pepper.

The draw is phenomenal. The smoke is plentiful. It’s thick, it’s white, it’s voluminous. The light gray ash is firm, like a stack of dimes. And the burn? It’s straight. This is a medium-bodied and medium flavored cigar. But it’s balanced, complex, and smooth. This is a cigar best enjoyed in solitary. It deserves full attention. Experience as a cigar smoker and a good palate are required to fully ‘get’ this cigar. The smoke time is two hours and forty minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? I wish I could

Categories: 93, Daniel Marshall, Dominican cigars, Tabacalera A. Fuente y Cia | Tags: , , , , ,

Muestra de Saka Chubby Unicorn

Muestra de Saka Chubby Unicorn. Now, this is a true unicorn. Steve Saka created the Muestra de Saka Unicorn as a joke, to see if it was possible to sell a $100 cigar. But he did it with the best tobaccos he could find, not messing around with his integrity and reputation. Much to his surprise, they sold like hotcakes. He only makes 1000 Muestra de Saka Unicorns a year and last September he told me that he has backorders for at least 7000 Unicorns. And then he gave a Muestra de Saka Chubby Unicorn.


The Chubby Unicorn is a tweaked version of the Muestra de Saka Unicorn. Saka felt it could be a bit better with an extra leaf, so he made the Chubby Unicorn. Yet he has no intention to produce them for a commercial release. It is too much of a hassle, it takes up more time, energy and effort than it’s worth. The Chubby Unicorn is even more of a unicorn than the annual release. During our conversation, which took place at the launch of the Sin Compromiso El Amsterdammer, Saka did not comment on the blend. Neither did he go into specifics of the cigar.


The cigar looks great. The shape is beautiful. The wrapper is dark and oily. The veins are thin yet clear, but it fits the color and the shine. The ring looks handwritten. The cigar feels well constructed. We suspect that the same pair of rollers responsible for the Muestra de Saka Unicorn is responsible for the Chubby Unicorn as well. The aroma is woody.


The cold draw is amazing, even though only the cap was cut. The small opening gives an amazing draw though. The flavors are thick and nutty. The start is very leathery but with sweetness and cloves. Leather, soil, coffee, and spices held together by some sweetness if that comes after the initial puffs. Soon to be joined by some pepper and wood. Slowly the cigar evolves to more nutty flavors, as in the cold draw. But with wood, leather, spices, and pepper. The mouthfeel is thick and creamy. Some dark chocolate shows up as well. The leather makes a comeback right before the end of the first third. The second third is mostly nuts, with some soil, pepper, and wood. In the final third, the nut flavors are gone. It’s wood, leather, and pepper galore in the end.


The draw is phenomenal. The cigar produces a thick, full smoke in copious amounts. The burn is a little uneven though and had to be corrected. The salt and pepper colored ash is firm. The cigar is both full-bodied and full-flavored. It is well balanced though with a lot of character. The smoke time is three hours.

Would I smoke this cigar again? I wish

number93

Categories: 93, Fabrica de Tabacos Joya de Nicaragua, Nicaraguan cigars | Tags: , , , ,

Create a free website or blog at WordPress.com.