Posts Tagged With: Barrel-aged

Diesel Whisky Row Robusto

Diesel Whisky Row Robusto. Who owns Diesel Cigars is a bit of a mystery to most cigar enthusiasts. Despite popular belief, it is not a brand from A.J. Fernandez although Fernandez is the manufacturer responsible for the brand. But the brand isn’t in the hands of A.J. Fernandez, it’s just blended by his skillful hands. And the production takes place at his factory in Esteli, Nicaragua. The owner of Diesel cigars is Scandinavian Tobacco Group, through Meier & Dutch. STG is the parent of General Cigars, Cigar.com, Cigarsinternational.com Thompson.com, Cigarbid.com, and more. Last year, they acquired Royal Agio as well. Meier & Dutch is a wholesale company that operates under the STG umbrella. The original Diesel Unholy Cocktail was only available at STG owned internet retailers in the past.

The Diesel Unholy Cocktail is so popular that the Diesel brand spawned into a whole series. And not exclusive through the STG stores anymore, but everywhere. Some lines even made it across the ocean to Europe. For the Diesel Whisky Row, the Diesel brand and Rabbit Hole distilleries collaborate. Rabbit Hole distilleries, a bourbon manufacturer, sends used barrels to A.J. Fernandez. Fernandez uses those barrels to age Mexican San Andres leaves. He uses them as a binder under an Ecuadorian Habano wrapper. For the filler, he uses aged Nicaraguan tobacco from Jalapa, Condega, and Ometepe. Ministry of Cigars reviews the 5½x52 Robusto.

The first thing that makes this cigar stand out is the shape of the ring. It’s big and diagonally placed over the cigar. But then there is a partially round part as well. Pastel blue, brown, and gray. It has the Diesel logo and the Rabbit Hole Bourbon logo. The foot ring is big as well that says that the cigar is bourbon barrel-aged and it has the names of both Diesel and Rabbit Hole prominently on the ring. The Colorado Maduro colored wrapper is smooth looking. Right below the head, there seems to be a softer spot. The aroma is strong, barnyard, and manure.

The cold draw is great. There is a bit of an alcohol taste in the cold draw, but that could be just a mind trick. There is some spice on the lips as well. Once lit, there is leather, wood, soil, and citrus acidity. There is also an alcohol flavor to the cigar, so the barrel aging does work. The barrel aging brings out more vanilla from the wood. There is a nice toasted flavor, floral, with wood, leather, nuts, and that alcohol right on the edge. Halfway there is also some nutmeg in the flavor profile, or is it cinnamon? Slowly the flavors change to wood, leather, and chocolate. All with that alcoholic mouthfeel and slight pepper. The sweetness returns, the pepper gains strength, and all on a base flavor of wood and leather.

The construction is great. A lot of thick white smoke. Beautiful light gray ash. A great draw and a straight burn. The cigar is smooth, well-rounded flavors. The cigar is medium to full in body, full in flavor. The smoke time is three hours and fifteen minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? On my next order

Categories: 91, Diesel, Nicaraguan cigars, Tabacalera A.J. Fernandez | Tags: , , , , ,

Winston Churchill The Late Hour Robusto

Winston Churchill The Late Hour Robusto. When Davidoff acquired Camacho in 2008, they changed everything. They reblended the Camacho blends. They redesigned the packaging and the rings. And with that, they lost a lot of the Camacho fanbase. It took the brand years to recover from all the changes. But they hit the bullseye when Davidoff introduced the barrel-aged series for Camacho. The tobaccos for those cigars are aged in liquor casks. The Camacho American Barrel Aged used bourbon barrels. And for the Camacho Nicaraguan Barrel-Aged, barrels from the Nicaraguan rum brand Flor de Caña are used. The cigars are so popular, that Davidoff decided to use the same technique for the Winston Churchill Late Hour.


For the Davidoff Winston Churchill Late Hour, Davidoff placed Nicaraguan viso from Condega in barrels. They picked scotch barrels from the Speyside region. The tobacco was aged for an additional six months inside those barrels before being used as filler in the cigar. Together with more Nicaraguan and Dominican tobaccos. The binder comes from Mexico and the wrapper is a dark Habano wrapper from Ecuador. They are available in a 7×48 Churchill, 6×54 Toro, and a 5×52 Robusto. Ministry of Cigars is reviewing the robusto.

The cigar looks good, a very dark, oily and smooth wrapper with a vein or two. A beautiful black and golden ring with the classic silhouette of Winston Churchill with a cigar in his mouth. A secondary with the name of the line and the size complete the look. The aroma is quite strong. A little wood, some chocolate, and barnyard. The cigar feels well filled, with the right amount of sponginess.

The cold draw is easy. The cigar has a raw tobacco flavor and indeed something whisky as well, but faint. The cigar has some sweetness, coffee, and whisky after being lit. There are some leather and some wood. And it’s the wood that has that whisky feel to it. After half a centimeter, some acidity shows up with pepper. The flavors don’t really change, but they intensify. They get stronger and a mild vegetable flavor is added. The mouthfeel is dry. Halfway the cigar gets a little bitter, harsh. With the wood, leather, pepper, and acidity. The bitterness tones down but remains, just like the rest of the flavors.


The draw is loose, a little too loose. The smoke is good though. The light-colored ash is quite firm. But the burn had to be corrected. The smoke time is two hours and ten minutes. This cigar is medium-bodied, medium flavored.

Would I buy this cigar again? I had high hopes for this cigar but it didn’t deliver.

number87

Categories: 87, Cigars Davidoff, Davidoff, Dominican cigars | Tags: , , , ,

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