Posts Tagged With: Connecticut shade

Jas Sum Kral Tyrannical Buc Generosos Connecticut

Jas Sum Kral Tyrannical Buc Generosos Connecticut. This is one of the Tyrannical Buc blends that Jas Sum Kral released in 2019. The first announcement was just the name and the logo. More details surfaced later. And the cigar is slowly making it’s way to the international markets. The Jas Sum Kral distributors in Sweden and Malaysia have ordered and received the Tyrannical Buc. The cigar got a lot of praise from people within the Habanos scene. The Cuban cigars oriented Friends of Habanos called this the best cigar smoked in 2019.


The Jas Sum Kral Tyrannical Buc is available in four vitolas. And with two different wrappers. Either a Connecticut Shade wrapper from Ecuador or a Connecticut Broadleaf wrapper. The binder and fillers are the same for both blends. A Nicaraguan binder from Jalapa, with fillers from Nicaragua and Pennsylvania USA. The sizes available are a 4×48 Magnum 48, a 6½x50 Dobles, a 5½x60 Golum and this 5½x40 Generosos. For this review, we selected the Connecticut Shade blend. The cigars are made at Tabacalera Aragon, the factory in which Jas Sum Kral has a stake.

The cigar looks alright. The wrapper is quite dark for a Connecticut Shade. The ring is simple, a little too simple to our taste. Just a white ring with a drawing of a T-Rex. Now the detail is nice. Jas Sum Kral means I am king, and the t-rex is wearing a crown. But the other Jas Sum Kral rings are so detailed and gorgeous, that this ring seems bare. Maybe a different color would help. The cigar feels well constructed, not underfilled nor hard. The mild aroma has a reminiscence of hay and grass.


The cold draw is a little tight. The aroma in the cold draw is slightly sweet, yet spicy, tobacco. After lighting there’s coffee, honey sweetness, and a little spice. The flavors lack the classic Connecticut Shade mustiness, which is positive. Slowly some leather shows up. The honey keeps lingering around, with a grassy and dried leaves flavor. There’s also a little salt while slowly some oak shows up as well. The mild pepper is a constant in this cigar’s flavor profile. The final third is more of the same. Pepper, wood, a little grass, and herbs.


The draw is a bit tight. But the light-colored ash is amazing. Dense, firm, and beautiful. Even with the tight draw, the smoke is decent. Enough in thickness and volume, but with a better draw the smoke would have been better too. The burn is razor-sharp. The cigar is medium-full flavored and bodied. The smoke time is two hours and fifteen minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? I would not mind smoking a few more.

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Categories: 90, Jas Sum Kral, Nicaraguan cigars, Tabacalera Aragon | Tags: , , , ,

Joya de Nicaragua Numero Uno L’Ambassadeur

Joya de Nicaragua Numero Uno L’Ambassadeur. That is a long name for a unique cigar. You can call it the Nicaraguan Cohiba or Trinidad, as the history shares some resemblance. All three were diplomatic gifts before being released commercially years later. The Joya de Nicaragua Numero Uno was released this year, after surfacing as an event only cigar last year. The production is limited to 1500 boxes a year, and only one size is available. That’s this Lonsdale called L’Ambassadeur, which is a reference to the diplomatic history of this cigar.


In the past, the Nicaraguan government used another Joya de Nicaragua cigar as the official gift. That was the Antaño 1970, a strong cigar. With the Numero Uno, they went for a milder cigar. The Connecticut Shade wrapper from Ecuador is much milder tobacco than the strong wrapper and blend from the Antaño. The filler and binder tobaccos are all from Nicaragua.

The pale wrapper looks decent. There is some shine from the oil, thin veins. It’s just a typical thin and brittle Connecticut Shade wrapper. The blue from the big cigar ring pops, it’s a nice contrast from the pale yellowish-brown wrapper. The cigar has a triple cap with a little pigtail. The construction feels good, with the right amount of bounce. The aroma is medium in strength. It has that grassy hay aroma that you can expect from Connecticut Shade wrappers.


The cold draw is fine. It gives a lot of flavor, raw tobacco and raisins. After lighting it’s earthy, coffee, pepper, nutmeg, and a little muted sweetness. Then some slightly harsh grass flavor shows up too, with a hint of milk chocolate. The classic Connecticut Shade mustiness isn’t as strong as in most Connecticut Shade cigars, but it is there, looming on the background. The flavors then evolve to soil, leather, citrus, pepper, and salt. The mouthfeel is a bit creamy. The cigar turns grassy again, with cedar. The mustiness is no longer lingering on the background. Halfway the cigar is creamy with old leather, licorice, and sweetness. And for a while, there is a black licorice flavor. After two thirds, it’s the old leather with spices, pepper, cedar, and that typical Connecticut mustiness. In the final part, the cigar is creamy with toast, cedar, sweetness, and pepper.


The draw is fantastic. And since thinner ring cigars are harder to roll than the ticker cigars, a compliment to the rollers is well deserved. The ash is white. And the smoke is decent, both in thickness and volume. The burn is good. This cigar is mild to medium-bodied, medium flavored. The smoke time is three hours.

Would I buy this cigar again? No, it’s not suitable for my palate.

number90

Categories: 90, Fabrica de Tabacos Joya de Nicaragua, Joya de Nicaragua, Nicaraguan cigars | Tags: , , , ,

Dalay Affentanz Hell

The German retailer Dalay is owned and operated by real cigar aficionados. And ones that have the guts to take bold decisions. One of those decisions was to create its own cigar brand. The brand carries the same name as the shop, Dalay. It is sold all over Germany. And in 2017, two limited editions were released under the name ‘affentanz’. That’s German for monkey dance. Another bold decision to use that name. In the current political climate, some might consider that racist.

The Dalay Affentanz Hell is the Connecticut Shade version of the Affentanz. There is only one size available, a 5×52 belicoso with a very sharp head. The filler comes from the Dominican Republic and Brazil. The binder is Dominican. The wrapper is an Ecuadorian Connecticut Shade. The cigars have a price tag of €9,50.

The wrapper is light, it has that yellow-brown color of Ecuadorian Connecticut Shade which I find unappealing. The construction feels good, but the cigar looks a bit off with the steep point. The rings are cool, with a funny peeled banana logo and a monkey on the back. The woody aroma is strong.

The cold draw is great. I taste spicy licorice and pepper, but with that faint Connecticut Shade mustiness which I hate. The first puffs are harsh, strong. I taste coffee, leather, and earthiness. The leather is the most pronounced flavor. There is also a little grass, plus some sweetness from Brazilian tobacco. The flavors evolve to more wood with leather. But there is some sweetness and even a creamy chocolate flavor. All slightly harsh though, the flavors aren’t rounded. After a third, the flavors get more refined. I taste leather, chocolate, nuts, grass, and sweetness. In the final third, the dreaded Connecticut Shade flavor shows up, but it is faint. The flavors remain the same until the end, except for growing pepper.


The draw is great. As is the smoke. The burn is straight. The cigar is medium bodied and medium flavored. The salt and pepper colored ash is firm. The smoke time is one hour and thirty minutes

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Would I buy this cigar again? It’s still a Connecticut Shade cigar, but not a bad one

number90

Categories: 90, Dalay, Dominican cigars, Tabacalera Zauberberg | Tags: , , , , ,

Undercrown Shade Flying Pig

By now, the story of the Flying Pig is probably known. When Drew Estate started making cigars, people said that they would only become successful when pigs would fly. And successful they became. Then Steve Saka, back then CEO of Drew Estate, found the Flying Pig vitola. He was in Tampa and found a 100-year-old catalog from an old cigar factory., That catalog had the Flying Pig vitola, but under another name. Saka decided to make the cigars, in the Liga Privada #9 blend as a limited edition. And as a salute to the naysayers, the cigars were called Flying Pigs.

The Liga Privada lines were so popular that Drew Estate asked the rollers to stop smoking them. So the rollers switched some tobaccos, leaving out the rare ones. That line became the Undercrown. And the Undercrown got so popular that offshoots appeared. The second Undercrown blend to be released was the Undercrown Shade. That’s a milder version of the Undercrown blend, with a Connecticut Shade wrapper from Ecuador. The binder is Sumatra. The fillers come from Nicaragua and the Dominican Republic. Drew Estate released a sampler with three different Undercrown Flying Pigs. Royal Agio, the distributor of Drew Estate in several European countries, provided me with a sampler.

The cigar looks great. The shape is unique and the pigtail is the icing on the cake when it comes to looks. The cigar feels good. The Connecticut Shade wrapper has a mild shine. The veins are thin. The white with the gold color scheme for the rings are well chosen. It fits the color of the wrapper. The logo is great too, an upside-down crown with a lion’s face. The aroma isn’t mild. It’s spicy, herbal and strong. But also smells like straw.

The cold draw is good, with a raw tobacco flavor. Once lit, a mild coffee and leather flavor is tasted. With salt that is. There’s also some cedar wood. But the flavors are smooth like the volume isn’t cracked open. Elevator music in a cigar, that idea. After a few puffs, there is some acidity and grass. The mouthfeel is mild creamy. Once the cigar opens up when the burn is passed the small foot, the flavors get stronger. Nutmeg, a bit of pepper, leather but also that Connecticut Shade mustiness. And that last part is the downside of all Connecticut Shade cigars. After a third some marzipan sweetness shows up, faint and on the background. The final third packs a little more power. Sweetness, pepper, leather, and wood. But still creamy with a little salt. The mustiness tones down a lot.

The draw is good. The burn is great. The ash is white and firm. The smoke is nothing like other Drew Estate products. Drew Estate is known for its smoke bombs. But this Undercrown Shade Flying Pig produces just a medium volume of smoke. It is not very thick, and gray instead of white. The cigar is mild to medium flavored. It’s also medium bodied. The smoke time is two hours.

Would I buy this cigar again? I will never buy any Connecticut Shade cigars again.

number88

Categories: 88, Gran Fabrica Drew Estate, Nicaraguan cigars, Undercrown | Tags: , , , , , ,

Tobacco Lords Cunninghame

Robert Graham 1874 is probably the oldest liquor and tobacco shop in Scotland. And in 2017, they decided to have their own cigars made. They reached out to Joya de Nicaragua and together they created two blends. The Tobacco Lords Maduro and Tobacco Lords Natural. The name refers to the historical tobacco merchants from the 1770s, who were all based in Glasgow. And they were important. At a certain moment in time, half of all the tobacco in Western Europe was stored in Glasgow. And owned by the tobacco lords.

 


One of those lords was William Cunninghame. And he was a man or low morale. Born in 1731, he went to the USA as an apprentice at the age of 15. He quickly climbed the ranks and when he went back to Glasgow in 1762, he was the manager of a huge tobacco plantation. He became a partner in the company. But in his megalomanic world, that wasn’t enough. So he changed the name of the company to his name. Their huge sailing ship was named Cunninghame as well. He wanted his name on everything. Besides tobacco, he bought and sold human slaves. And he bought tobacco cheap by squeezing the growers dry. He sailed luxury items to the United States, sold them on credit to the tobacco farmers. And then used that credit to purchase the tobacco way below market value. He retired at the age of 49. And 218 years after his death, he has another thing with his name on it. The Robusto size of the Tobacco Lords Natural

 

The cigar has a dark shade for Connecticut Shade. The cigar is well-formed, with a nice rounded head. The wrapper has some veins, it’s not the prettiest wrapper around. The construction feels good. The cigar has a strong aroma. It’s like standing in a hay shed, but at the end of winter. Not a fresh hay smell, but hay from a few months old.

 

The cold draw is fine. And I am certain it is a Connecticut shade wrapper now because of the musty yet spicy flavor. The first flavor is musty sweetness, classic Connecticut Shade. It changes to spice sweetness with the classic mustiness. After a centimeter, the flavors are still musty with sweetness, but now with added leather. And a mild creamy mouthfeel. After a third, I taste faint milky chocolate. That fades away quickly and it is sweet and musty again. With sometimes some leather, sometimes some wood. But all mild. Near the end, I suddenly taste a very floral flavor.

 


The draw is good. The ash is white and firm. The smoke is good. The burn is flawless. This is a medium bodied, medium flavored cigars. There is some evolution, but it’s not a lot. The smoke time is two hours and ten minutes.

Would I smoke this cigar again? Nope!

 

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Categories: 86, Fabrica de Tabacos Joya de Nicaragua, Nicaraguan cigars, Tobacco Lords | Tags: , , , , ,

Nestor Miranda Special Selection Connecticut Coffee Break

There was a time, back in the day, that I used to be an avid bomber, but also got bombed a lot. And for a while I added rings to cigars of who bombed me and what date I received the bomb. This was one of the cigar that still had the ring, even though is says “Slavac, 10/20/2009”. So that means that this cigar is at least a decade old but I also read that the cigar was only introduced in 2012 as a regular production. I have no idea if this was a regular production, or where information got mixed up.


I probably never smoked it because of the wrapper, as I have written many times before, I am not a fan of Connecticut Shade wrappers. I tried many, and the number of Connecticut Shade cigars I like can be counted on the fingers of one hand. All I can hope is that this My Father Cigars made 4½x50 Short Robusto aka Coffee Break, with its Ecuadorian Connecticut wrapper, Nicaraguan binder and filler from the Dominican, Nicaragua and Honduras is to my liking.


The wrapper has a light, yellow brown color. It also has a few clear veins, I don’t like the color much. The ring is much better, two tone gray and white with copper colored linings, special selection written in that copper color and Nestor Miranda special selection in red. On the back, where the ring is glued together you can find the Miami Cigar & Co logo. The cigar looks well made, it feels well made too. The aroma is mild peppery and manure.


After cutting I taste nothing actually with a good draw. After lighting I taste the classic Connecticut shade mustiness with sweetness, sugar sweetness. Halfway I taste the mustiness, with a sharp edge, sugar and a mild salty peanut flavor.


The draw is great, the light colored ash is firm and the burn is quite alright. The white smoke is thick and full. This is a mild cigar, medium flavored. The smoke time is an hour and twenty five minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? That Connecticut Shade still isn’t my kind of wrapper.

Score: 88
number88

Categories: 88, My Father Cigars, Nestor Miranda, Nicaraguan cigars | Tags: , , ,

Manowar Anthology Sampler: Manowar Virtue Torpedo

Last year, in september, I reviewed the same cigar. I did that before I came up with the idea to review this complete sampler but I’m not going to change my plans because of that older review, let’s just call this a quick redux.


The Man O’ War Virtue line was releases only two years after the Man O’ War brand came to life, and it was the third blend that got released. The regular Man O’ War and the Man O’ War Ruination were strong cigars, this Man O’ War Virtue, with the Nicaraguan Habano filler and binder and the Ecuadorian Connecticut wrapper was in a different league, the league of mild to medium cigars.


The light colored, almost pale, wrapper looks dry and brittle. The ring is the same as the other Man O’ War rings but in white and silver, making it more difficult to see what the picture is. The cigar is well made, it feels good and looks good. It has a medium strong hay and ammonia aroma.


The cold draw is fine, I taste dry, mild sweet and mild acidic raisin and tobacco. After lighting I taste a metallic dirt aroma. There’s also that classic Connecticut Shade mustiness. After the metallic dirt disappears I taste cedar, mild sweet, with that classic mustiness and a bit of black pepper. The flavors remain practically the same all around, except for a little metallic flavor returning at the end and the pepper grew in strength. In the dying seconds I taste some nuts too.


The draw is a bit loose and the cigar produces a lot of smoke. The salt and peppered colored ash is firm and pretty. The burn is straight. The cigar is medium bodied and medium flavored. The smoke time is an hour and forty minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? Nah, it’s a classic Connecticut Shade, which I don’t appreciate

Score: 89
number89

 

Categories: 89, Manowar, Nicaraguan cigars, Tabacalera A.J. Fernandez | Tags: , , , , , , ,

Alec Bradley Spirit of Cuba Natural Robusto

Two days ago, in the review of the Alec Bradley Spirit of Cuba Habano, I mentioned prejudice and named a few of my cigar related prejudices. And this cigar ticks not one but two boxes, being a budget cigar and having a Connecticut Shade wrapper. And that combination makes me wonder why I punish myself with this whole month of budget cigars and even adding Connecticut Shade to the mix.


The cigar has a Connecticut wrapper but the Alec Bradley website doesn’t specify where it is grown. The binder is Nicaraguan and the filler comes from both Nicaragua and Honduras. This is the final blend from the Spirit of Cuba series. I also notice that only a 5×50 robusto is mentioned on the website where before there were other vitolas too.


The wrapper is quite dark for a Connecticut but it has an ugly and long vein all over the front of the cigar. The ring is the same as the others with a red base color this time, its not as cool as the black from the Corojo but better than the yellow from the Habano. The construction seems good, no plugs of soft spots. The aroma reminds me of cedar, white pepper and dog poop.


I used a cutter to take the cap off. The cold draw is good, with a mild sour and sweet flavor. After lighting I taste sweetness with a hint of pepper. After a third the sweetness is gone, I taste a little wood with allspice, muted though. Halfway it’s acidity with that musty Connecticut Shade flavor. Slowly the cigar gets a little harsh too. The final few puffs are wood with powdered sugar bad a bit pepper.


The draw is perfect and the smoke is thick. The ash is white and firm. The burn is great. The cigar is mild to medium bodied and flavored.

Would I buy this cigar again? Nope

Score: 78
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Categories: 78, Alec Bradley, Honduran cigars, Raices Cubanas | Tags: , , , ,

708 Connecticut Junior

708 Cigars is the brand of two Chicago brothers that run a shop and are, at least from what I learn on the internet, involved with Drew Estate in some Arab countries as distributers but I don’t know exactly what that deal is. I know I got these cigars as a sampler from a company that is thinking about bringing them to the Dutch market. And there is the Drew Estate connection again, the owner of that company is a close personal friend of Jonathan Drew.


I only have the 4×44 Junior in this Connecticut Shade blend, I smoked the same vitola and a Churchill in the barberpole version once before though. The website of 708 cigars doesn’t tell me anything except for the size and that they come in 20 count boxes but the description for the filler, binder and wrapper is proprietary according to the website.


The wrapper is pale, its got veins, it’s wrinkly at the head and the cap is placed by, what it appears to be, a novice roller. The cigar feels evenly filled though. The ring is nice colored, in bathroom or kitchen colors, gray with beige and the logo looks like a hand written 708. The print quality is good. The cigar has a full aroma and all that comes to mind is poop, poop and manure, which is poop too.


I cut the cigar on a Sunday morning, since it’s a Connecticut Shade I think this could be a morning smoke. When I wet the tip I notice a sweetened tip, that’s a downer. The cold draw is loose and I taste chemical sweetness. After lighting I taste coffee with that chemical sweetness. After a quarter of an inch the cigar turns spicy too. But that chemical sweetness destroys it all. Halfway the sweetness disappears, I taste spicy cedar now, a little on the harsh side. The harshness grows and I have to toss the cigar.


The draw is loose, but the thick, white and voluminous smoke makes up for it. The ash is black and white with thick layers. This mild to medium bodied and medium flavored cigar has a smoke time of thirty minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? Hell no!

Score: 78
number78

Categories: 708 Cigars, 78, Dominican cigars | Tags: , , ,

Corona Dominican 10th Anniversary Phatty

When I made my first trip to the USA in the spring of 2009 I landed in heaven when I walked into Corona Cigar Company at their West Sand Lake store in Orlando, I had never seen so many cigars in my life, and a lot of them were unknown for me coming from a country that has limited room for brands and back then most of the cigars sold were Cubans, something that changed dramatically in the years after though. And the shop has been a stable hang out for me every time I visited the USA since. Since it’s the owner Jeff’s birthday I’m publishing this review today.


During one of my trips, and I am guessing it was the 2011 trip, I bought a sampler of their 10th anniversary cigars, a sampler with a variety of different blends and sizes and amongst them was this Corona Dominican Selection 10th Anniversary Phatty, a 6×60 Connecticut Shade wrapped cigar. And I never touched it for two reasons, the 60 ring gauge and the Connecticut Shade wrapper, but lately I started to enjoy the latter so why not light it? If it doesn’t meet up to my prefered taste then at least I get a review out of it and will light a cigar I love later.


The wrapper feels very silky but also bumpy like a klingon queen, so I guess the binder was very rough. The wrapper has a mild shine to it. The construction feels good but the head has a weird bump on it, it almost looks like the binder had a pig tail and the wrapper was rolled over it. The aroma is strong, much stronger than I expected, and reminds me of a sour hay with a little hint of ammonia. The ring is nice, golden with an embossed 10 at the bottom, red stripes on the top part with the Corona logo in red on a white background.


I cut the cigar with my xikar cutter and the cold draw is easy with a mild straw and raisin flavor. Right after lighting the cigar, with my soft flame of course, I taste coffee, hay, a little honey and some pepper but with the classic Connecticut shade mustiness. After a centimeter I taste musty cedar with pepper. After a third I taste nuts with some cedar with a bit of salt and pepper, the flavors are a little harsh but not in an unpleasant way. Slowly the pepper gains strength and a cedar flavor joins the flavor palate. After two thirds I also taste quite a strong lemon flavor.


The draw is a little bit loose, for my personal preference it could use a little more resistance but I guess the big ring gauge is part of the cause. The smoke is full and thick, just as I like it. The light gray ash is a bit coarse but pretty dense and firm. The burn is pretty straight for the first inch but then starts to get a little crooked. The cigar is medium bodied, medium full flavored. The smoke time is an hour and forty minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? Since you can get them for just $3 this is a great humidor filler. And they make great cigars for the non smokers or incidental smokers.

Score: 89
number89

Categories: 89, Corona, Dominican cigars | Tags: , , , ,

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