Posts Tagged With: Corona

Illusione OneOff Corona

Illusione OneOff Corona. A cigar that was released in the early 2000s but is a part of the Illusione book of cigars since 2017. The owner of the La Casa del Habano Milan had been trying to get a custom made cigar line from Cuba. After many attempts and just as many negative responses from Habano, he tried Nicaragua. Plasencia created the OneOff brand for him, with Honduran and Nicaraguan tobaccos. Since then, the rights to the brands were sold a few times. And in 2017, Dion Giolito acquired it.

He moved the production to Tabacos Valle de Jalapa aka TABSA. It’s a factory in Esteli, Nicaragua where most of Illusione’s cigars are made. The factory is owned by Eduardo Fernandez from Aganorsa Leaf. Of course, the blend changed as well. OneOff is now a Nicaraguan puro, and available in many sizes. Brian Motola from Illusione gave us this 5½x42 Corona after the Intertabac trade show 2019 when we met for a cigar at Cigaragua in Amsterdam.

The first thing that stands out is the ring. Orange, with the international peace sign in white. No name, no mention of Illusione anywhere. Nothing. Just that white peace logo on an orange ring. Mysterious. It tickles the curiosity. The Colorado colored wrapper looks fine. The construction feels good. The cigar smells a little acidic, even though it has been stored for almost a year in our humidor. Hay and ammonia, medium strong.

The cold draw is fine. With a spicy hay aroma. Once lit, there’s leather, coffee, soil, gingerbread spices, and a mild black pepper in the retrohale. The sweetness gains some strength with the leather and pepper as base flavors. The leather remains, but wood is joining the palate with hay. The sweetness is gone. There is still a hint of pepper, but it’s faint. There is also a faint milk chocolate flavor. The chocolate slowly grows. The cigar is smooth, balanced, and easy-going. The final third has pepper, leather, and that lingering milk chocolate. Some licorice shows up too. A spicy, salty yet minty flavor appears too.

The draw is great. This cigar produces a lot of beautiful white smoke. The burn is good, there was a minor issue at the beginning that was auto-corrected. This is an easy-going, smooth, and balanced cigar. Not a lot of character, but very pleasant. The smoke time of this medium-bodied, medium-full flavored cigar is two hours and twenty minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? I prefer the Illusione Rothchildes, which are more budget-friendly as well.

Categories: 90, Illusione, Nicaraguan cigars, TABSA | Tags: , , , ,

San Pedro de Macoris Sun Grown Corona

San Pedro de Macoris Sun Grown Corona. A long name for a cigar. But a good name is you know the reason for it. The Royal Agio factory is located in the town of San Pedro de Macoris. And to honor the people from the town that works for Royal Agio, the Wintermans family named a cigar line after the town. A cigar line that started out with an Ecuador and Brazil blend. But now there is also a Nicaraguan blend and this Sun Grown blend. Royal Agio is now part of Scandinavian Tobacco Group and taken off the American market. What will happen with the brand is unsure of the new owners. Scandinavian Tobacco group doesn’t have the best track record when it comes to acquiring brands and doing them well. You can read more about Agio in articles about the history of the brand part one and part two on the affiliated site Ministry of Cigars.

This cigar is available in several sizes. A small Perla. A classic Robusto. The unavoidable Gran Toro. And then this 5⅞x42 Corona. The filler contains tobacco from the Dominican Republic, Nicaragua, and the Agio signature Brazil. The binder comes from the Dominican Republic. The wrapper is Ecuadorian Habano. The San Pedro de Macoris lines are all budget-friendly. This corona comes in at €3.70 in Germany, the largest cigar market in Europe. But even the 6×52 Gran Toro comes in below 5 euro. Earlier I did a review of the San Pedro de Macoris Nicaragua Corona, San Pedro de Macoris Brazil Robusto, and the San Pedro de Macoris Ecuador Robusto.

The cigar looks nice. Somehow slender cigars look more elegant than robusto sized cigars or thicker. More sophisticated. The ring pops, matte black with bright yellow, red, blue, and silver. The wrapper is Colorado colored and feels like very fine sandpaper. The construction feels great. The medium-strong aroma is on the darker side of the palate Wood, earthiness, manure, those kinds of smell.

The cold draw is fine with a classic raw tobacco flavor. After lighting the cigar releases chocolate, coffee, leather, and soil. The mouthfeel is a bit sticky, thick, textured. Those flavors hang around for a bit, with some sweetness from the Brazilian tobacco, and a hint of black pepper. After a third, the flavors change to that cocoa flavor but with hay and more pepper. That hay becomes stronger and some cedar shows up as well. The mouthfeel remains textured and thick. In the last third, there is more cedar but the cocoa flavor deteriorates to a slightly unpleasant flavor.

The ash is dark, almost black. It is not firm either. The draw is fantastic. The smoke is thick and white. The burn is straight. This is a medium-bodied and medium flavored cigar. The smoke time is an hour and forty-five minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? No

Categories: 89, Agio Caribbean Tobacco Company, Dominican cigars, San Pedro de Macoris | Tags: , , , ,

Davtian Rubina Corona

Davtian Rubina Corona. One of the twelve cigars from Davtian Cigars. The company produces six lines in the Dominican Republic. Each line exists in two sizes. The Rubina is available in a Corona and a Petit Corona with the name The Queen. I reviewed Davtian Trinidad, Davtian Habana, and Davtian Primus before. Davtian is making cigars since 2011 when the Armenian entrepreneur David Davtian founded the brand.

This 6×46 Corona comes from Tabacalera El Puente. This 6×46 Davtian Rubina Corona is a Dominican Puro with a Habano 2000 Rojizo wrapper. The binder is Piloto Cubano Seco. For the filler, Davtian utilizes San Vicente Viso and Seco, Criollo 98 Viso, and Piloto Cubano Viso. Davtian cigars are available in Southern Africa, South East Asia, and some European markets including The Netherlands.

It is a good looking cigar. A Maduro colored wrapper, oily, but with a vein or two facing the front. A nicely shaped golden and black ring. The triple cap is a bit sloppy though. The construction feels good. There is a mild leather aroma coming from the cigar.

The cold draw is fine, with the right air resistance. There is a sweetness, some spice, leather, and hay in the cold draw. Quite a lot of flavors to taste in the cold draw. Once lit, the cigar gives mild chocolate, earthiness, coffee, and a hint of spice. Quickly followed by complex wood. The mouthfeel is sticky. Wood becomes the main flavor, with something grassy in the background. The mouthfeel changes to creamy. With some leather, wood, and soil. After a third, the main flavor is wood with a little nutmeg. The final third starts with a crisp wood flavor and strong pepper. Later on, leather joins the two flavors.

The draw is phenomenal. The ash is firm and light gray, almost tin-colored. The smoke is a little thin, although the volume gets more along the way. The burn is straight and slow. This cigar is medium-bodied, yet the flavor is medium-full. The smoke time is two and a half hours.

Would I buy this cigar again? No, this is not a cigar that fits my palate

Categories: 89, Davtian, Dominican cigars, Tabacalera El Puente | Tags: , , , ,

Oscar Superfly Maduro Super Corona

Oscar Superfly Maduro Super Corona. In 2019, Oscar Valladares released the Super Fly Maduro. A cigar inspired by the 1970s in style. Funky colors, bigger than life. A bold smoke, that came in a velvet lined box to further enhance that pimp look and feel of the line. Earlier this year, Oscar released another Super Fly line, with a Connecticut Shade wrapper.

Valladares says this is the strongest cigar he makes. It’s the first time he used Dominican tobacco in one of his blends. The wrapper comes from San Andres in Mexico. The binder is Honduran. The filler comes from Honduras, Nicaragua, and the Dominican Republic. Canteros, the New Zealand distributor for Oscar, sponsored Ministry of Cigars with this cigar. This is the 5¼x45 Super Corona. Other sizes available are 6×54 Super Toro and the 6½x60 Super Gordo

The cigar looks great. A very dark wrapper, slightly dry and leathery is the perfect match for the funky ring. The ring breathes 1970s funk and pimp. An unusual shape, shiny purple, and gold, typography from that era. This is a cigar to smoke while watching Shaft or any other blaxploitation movie from the 1970s. Or Jackie Brown, which is Tarantino’s tribute of blaxploitation. The cigar feels well constructed. The aroma is strong and woody.

The cold draw is flawless and releases some brown spices in the flavor profile. Dry spices, dry wood, and a mild cocoa flavor are the flavors that start the cigar. The cigar turns more to a dark chocolate flavor profile. With brown spices as supporting flavor. Some sugar sweetness shows up as well. With a hint of leather over the chocolate, earthiness, and wood. Wood, sweetness, and brown spices are the main flavors. After a third, the cigar is too strong to retrohale. The pepper in the nose is too strong. The wood and leather get more pronounced, the sweetness fades away. A little citrus acidity shows up to balance all flavors out.

The draw is great. The ash is as white as snow. The smoke is thick and plentiful. The burn is straight as an arrow. The cigar is medium-full bodied, medium-full flavored. To stay in the 70s mood, this cigar is dy-no-mite! It’s groovy, or the bomb. The smoke time is two hours.

Would I buy this cigar again? This cigar is so groovy, I want more.

Categories: 93, Honduran cigars, Leaf by Oscar, Oscar Valladares Tobacco Factory | Tags: , , , , ,

Jas Sum Kral Tyrannical Buc Generosos Connecticut

Jas Sum Kral Tyrannical Buc Generosos Connecticut. This is one of the Tyrannical Buc blends that Jas Sum Kral released in 2019. The first announcement was just the name and the logo. More details surfaced later. And the cigar is slowly making it’s way to the international markets. The Jas Sum Kral distributors in Sweden and Malaysia have ordered and received the Tyrannical Buc. The cigar got a lot of praise from people within the Habanos scene. The Cuban cigars oriented Friends of Habanos called this the best cigar smoked in 2019.


The Jas Sum Kral Tyrannical Buc is available in four vitolas. And with two different wrappers. Either a Connecticut Shade wrapper from Ecuador or a Connecticut Broadleaf wrapper. The binder and fillers are the same for both blends. A Nicaraguan binder from Jalapa, with fillers from Nicaragua and Pennsylvania USA. The sizes available are a 4×48 Magnum 48, a 6½x50 Dobles, a 5½x60 Golum and this 5½x40 Generosos. For this review, we selected the Connecticut Shade blend. The cigars are made at Tabacalera Aragon, the factory in which Jas Sum Kral has a stake.

The cigar looks alright. The wrapper is quite dark for a Connecticut Shade. The ring is simple, a little too simple to our taste. Just a white ring with a drawing of a T-Rex. Now the detail is nice. Jas Sum Kral means I am king, and the t-rex is wearing a crown. But the other Jas Sum Kral rings are so detailed and gorgeous, that this ring seems bare. Maybe a different color would help. The cigar feels well constructed, not underfilled nor hard. The mild aroma has a reminiscence of hay and grass.


The cold draw is a little tight. The aroma in the cold draw is slightly sweet, yet spicy, tobacco. After lighting there’s coffee, honey sweetness, and a little spice. The flavors lack the classic Connecticut Shade mustiness, which is positive. Slowly some leather shows up. The honey keeps lingering around, with a grassy and dried leaves flavor. There’s also a little salt while slowly some oak shows up as well. The mild pepper is a constant in this cigar’s flavor profile. The final third is more of the same. Pepper, wood, a little grass, and herbs.


The draw is a bit tight. But the light-colored ash is amazing. Dense, firm, and beautiful. Even with the tight draw, the smoke is decent. Enough in thickness and volume, but with a better draw the smoke would have been better too. The burn is razor-sharp. The cigar is medium-full flavored and bodied. The smoke time is two hours and fifteen minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? I would not mind smoking a few more.

number90

Categories: 90, Jas Sum Kral, Nicaraguan cigars, Tabacalera Aragon | Tags: , , , ,

Maria Mancini Edicion Especial Corona

Maria Mancini Edicion Especial Corona. This Honduran brand is owned and distributed by Schuster Cigars from Germany. The 110-year-old company is making cigars in Bunde, Germany. But besides making their own cigars, the company distributes RoMa Craft worldwide and a few brands on their German home market as well, including Debonaire. And they own a few Caribbean made brands, such as Iron Shirt, Maria Mancini, Casa de Torres and more.


Maria Mancini is sold in several countries, and in several blends. This is the Edicion Especial in a corona size. According to the Cigarworld website, it is a Honduran Puro. So the filler, binder, and the sun-grown wrapper all come from Honduras. The 5½x44 corona was introduced in 2004 and has been for sale since. And the price? In Germany, this cigar has a fixed price tag of €4,60, making it a budget cigar.


The cigar looks good. A nice Colorado Maduro colored wrapper, with some slight and thin veins. It is almost leathery looking. The ring is a bit outdated, old fashioned with red, white and gold. It could use an update. The cigar has a nice aroma, quite strong. It smells like leather and forest. The construction feels good. The cap is close to perfect.


The cold draw is good. It has flavors of raw tobacco, spice, and raisin. The first puffs are Cuban coffee. Strong coffee with loads of sweetness. A few puffs later, the cigar has some citrus acidity and the flavor of old leather, still with some sweetness. The first third ends with cedar, leather, soil, and sweetness. The overall flavor is old, not mold but just old. The second third starts out with sweetness, hay, and grass. All of a sudden, there is a strong milk-chocolate flavor. There is a mild nuttiness as well. Halfway pepper shows up. The cigar gets more character with pepper, chocolate, nuts, and leather. These flavors are consistent to the end but are changing in strength along the way. Sometimes the chocolate is clearer, then the nuts, then the pepper.


The draw is great. The silver-colored ash looks good but isn’t firm. The smoke is okay, not bad but also not thick and full. This is a medium-bodied and medium flavored cigar. The burn is straight. The smoke time is two hours.

Would I buy this cigar again? No. It’s an enjoyable cigar for the money, but I rather pay 2 euro more and get something better

number89

Categories: 89, Honduran cigars, Maria Manchini | Tags: , , ,

Bolivar Coronas Extra Vintage 2003

Bolivar Coronas Extra Vintage 2003. You won’t find any of these cigars post-2012, as the cigar was discontinued in that year. But the sample that we are reviewing is from 2003. This is one of the many cigars that Habanos and Cubatabaco have discontinued in the last 20 years in favor of thicker cigars that seems to be catered for the American market. The American market is a no-go area for Cuban cigars, yet a big portion of the yearly production of Cuban cigars ends up in the United States through webshops anyway. And Habanos is catering to that market, by making Cuban cigars thicker and thicker as that’s where the demand from the United States is. Small rings suffer the consequences of that trend.


As for this particular cigar, it comes from the collection of a serious collector of Cuban cigars in Greece. The cigars have been aged for 16 years in the box, which led to the cigar being box-pressed. But not a factory box-press, a natural box-press.


The Colorado Maduro wrapper looks great. Beautiful color, nice shine. On the side of the cigar are a few veins. The Bolivar ring is the classic one. The portrait of Simon Bolivar on a yellow background. But honestly, if Simon Bolivar saw the way he was portrayed, the artist would probably be killed on the spot as it’s not a flattering painting. The triple cap is nice and the cigar feels well packed. No hard spots, no soft spots even though the cigars come from some troublesome years when the Cuban industry had a lot of issues with the construction of cigars. That came through an influx of new rollers and declining quality control. The aroma is almost gone, there are a mild forest and barnyard smell.


The cold draw is good and has a spicy flavor. Pepper, cinnamon, and toast. Once lit, the flavors are muted. Mild. A little leather with some spices. A faint pepper. But from Bolivar, more is to be expected. A little sweetness shows up underneath the leather. Slowly the pepper gets a little stronger, and some earthiness replaces the leather. The leather doesn’t disappear at all though, and a mild toast flavor is noticeable after a third as well. Halfway the cigar picks up white pepper. The sweetness is getting more pleasant and the flavors seem to pick up a little. There’s even a hint of milk chocolate and some cedarwood.


The draw is fine and the silver-gray ash is nice. The smoke is good, thick, enough volume and white. The cigar is medium-bodied, and overall medium flavored. It started mildly flavored but the flavors progressed to get better and stronger. The smoke time is two hours

Would I buy this cigar again? Nope
number87

Categories: 87, Bolivar (Habanos), Cuban cigars | Tags: , , , , ,

Dunhill Signed Range Corona

Alfred Dunhill opened his shop in London in 1907. In the 1930s he used his name for a cigar brand too, coming from Cuba. From that, he built an empire. Cigars, pipe tobacco, cigarettes, pipes, you name it and it carried the Dunhill name. But an era has come to an end. The current owners of the Dunhill name, British American Tobacco, discontinue everything except for the cigarettes. BAT is one of the worlds biggest players on the cigarette market and decided to focus on that completely.

 

These cigars, made in Esteli by General Cigars, were introduced in 2014. Or reintroduced is a better word, with a new blend. It’s got a Nicaraguan wrapper, Cameroon binder, and filler from Nicaragua and the Dominican Republic. I smoked the 5½x42 corona.

 

The cigar has a boring looking ring, old and in dire need of an upgrade. This ring does not appeal to younger cigar smokers at all. The cigar has a nice triple cap but the feet is cut at an angle. The cigar won’t stand up straight. The construction feels good. The aroma is strong. I smell barnyard with some musty hay.

 

The cold draw is perfect. I taste a fruity citrus acidity with some nutmeg and cardamom seeds. After lighting, I taste that citrus nutmeg and spice combination, with a little added pepper. It’s a mild start, but pleasant. After half a centimeter, I taste some leather and nuts, with nutmeg and a little citrus. There’s also faint vanilla. The flavors are all mild and a little dusty. After an inch, I taste more leather and spice. The mouthfeel is dry. The second third starts with leather, hay, and some pepper. At the halfway point, I taste toast with leather, dried leaves, and some sweetness. The final third starts with grass, hay, and pepper. The finale has some nuts and pepper.

 

The draw is great, the burn is good and the smoke is medium thick and full. The light-colored ash is flaky but firm. This is a medium bodied cigar, mild to medium flavored but there is evolution and the cigar does grow in strength. The smoke time is two hours and thirty minutes

.

Would I smoke this cigar again? No, it’s too boring for me

number88

Categories: 88, Dunhill, Nicaraguan cigars, STG Nicaragua | Tags: , , ,

Maria Mancini Edicion Limitada 2018 Corona

Maria Mancini is over twenty years old. And all those times the cigars have been made in Honduras. The brand is owned by the 100-year-old German August Schuster Zigarren from Bunde. They are one of the oldest cigar manufacturers in Germany, and one of the last German cigar producers still standing. For the last few years, they have released a Maria Mancini limited edition every year. In 2016 it was a Maria Mancini Robusto Particular. In 2017 the size was a Toro Lindo. For 2018, several sizes were made.

For the review, I chose the Corona Colorado. That’s a 5½x46 Corona sized cigar.

Not a lot has been revealed about the cigar. Even though the brand is over twenty years old, the factory is unknown. And the blend for the 2018 Edicion Limitada is undisclosed as well. The only thing that’s know is that the filler is from both Honduras and Nicaragua. Where the wrapper is from, or the binder is a mystery.

The cigar has a nice pig tail. The Colorado colored wrapper has thin veins. The ring is a bit dull. The image of Maria Mancini could use a little update, that would make the cigar more appealing in the humidor. The aroma is very nice. Spicy and green. Like lovage and natural fertilizer. The construction feels good.

The cold draw is a little loose. I taste raw tobacco, a little harsh, with some salt. The first puff gives a strong, bitter, coffee and leather flavor. The bitterness is a bit too strong. After a few puffs, some vanilla shows up. The bitterness slowly mellows down to an acceptable level. The vanilla is getting stronger, with a grassy flavor and some green herbs. Even though there is more balance and sweetness, the coffee and leather are lingering around. There’s some pepper in the flavor as well. The green herbs are getting stronger after a third. That goes for the vanilla and the sweetness too. With some pepper, leather, soil, and wood as supporting flavors. The flavors remain the same in the last part. Some coffee, some leather, some pepper, and a lot of sweetness. The final third is quite enjoyable with at the end some nuts.

The smoke is fantastic. Thick, white and full. The draw is good, although it could have been a little tighter. The ask is quite firm and has a nice light gray color. The burn is straight. The cigar is medium bodied, medium flavored. The smoke time is an hour and forty minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? It’s the best of the three Maria Mancini cigars I smoked so far. But I think I’ll pass.

number90

Categories: 90, Honduran cigars, Maria Manchini | Tags: , , , ,

Orchant Selección by Drew Estate Heavyweight

This is the third size of the Orchant Seleccion by Drew Estate and it’s called Heavyweight. The line is a limited edition, exclusively for C.Gars Ltd and will be sold online and in their Turmeaus shops. Managing Director for C.Gars Ltd is Mitchell Orchant and he’s been giving his name to hand selected boxes of Cuban cigars for a few years. And since 2014, a Non-Cuban limited edition is made for the Orchant Seleccion. In the past, Oliva, Davidoff, Regios, Alec Bradley and now the Orchant Seleccion by Drew Estate. In three sizes, all with a 46 ring. The Lightweight was reviewed two days ago. Yesterday Ministry of Cigars reviewed the Mediumweight. And this is the review of the Heavyweight.

The cigars are made at the La Gran Fabrica Drew Estate in Esteli, Nicaragua. That’s the same factory that’s used to make the highly-rated Liga Privada lines as well. For the blend, Drew Estate and Mitchel Orchant sourced tobaccos from Latin America, North America, and Southeast Asia. The wrapper is a stalk-cut Habano from the United States. Stalk Cut means that the leaves aren’t harvested separately but the whole tobacco plant is cut down and hung to dry. The binder comes from the South East Asian Indonesia, from the island of Sumatra. For the filler, some USA grown and some Indonesian tobacco was blended with tobaccos from Nicaragua and the Dominican Republic.

The cigar looks great. It has a dark, oily wrapper, which looks like leather. It feels good when touched, with the right amount of bounce. No real veins visible so the cigar looks smooth, yet dangerous due to the color. The aroma is quite strong. It has hints of soil, wet soil, and barnyard. The cigar that we are smoking has the factory ring, not the rings that they will be sold with.


The cold draw is great. The flavors are raw tobacco with some spice and sweetness. In the beginning, there is coffee, leather, and salt. The flavors are quite mild. Even the pepper isn’t ‘in your face’. After a few puffs, the flavors get more pronounced. And that’s when some hay and cinnamon show up too. Slowly some leather shows up and the pepper is dominant. After a centimeter, the cigar turns to toast, leather, wood, and pepper. The toast, with some slight cinnamon, and lots of pepper are the dominant flavors now. The cigar leans heavy to the leather, toast and pepper part of the flavor wheel, yet with very mild citrus and sweetness to balance it out. Halfway the toast turns to coffee, the cinnamon disappears. Coffee with pepper and a slight leathery flavor. In the final third, a nutty flavor shows up under the pepper.

The smoke is super thick and plentiful as you can expect from Drew Estate. The draw is good, a little tighter than the two other Orchant Seleccion by Drew Estate sizes. The ash is light-colored with darker smears. The burn is good. The cigar is full-bodied, full-flavored yet balanced. And it doesn’t feel as strong as the lightweight. The smoke time is two hours fifteen minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? Yes, I want a box

number92

Categories: 92, Gran Fabrica Drew Estate, Nicaraguan cigars, Orchant Selección | Tags: , , , ,

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