Posts Tagged With: figurado

Muestra de Saka Chubby Unicorn

Muestra de Saka Chubby Unicorn. Now, this is a true unicorn. Steve Saka created the Muestra de Saka Unicorn as a joke, to see if it was possible to sell a $100 cigar. But he did it with the best tobaccos he could find, not messing around with his integrity and reputation. Much to his surprise, they sold like hotcakes. He only makes 1000 Muestra de Saka Unicorns a year and last September he told me that he has backorders for at least 7000 Unicorns. And then he gave a Muestra de Saka Chubby Unicorn.


The Chubby Unicorn is a tweaked version of the Muestra de Saka Unicorn. Saka felt it could be a bit better with an extra leaf, so he made the Chubby Unicorn. Yet he has no intention to produce them for a commercial release. It is too much of a hassle, it takes up more time, energy and effort than it’s worth. The Chubby Unicorn is even more of a unicorn than the annual release. During our conversation, which took place at the launch of the Sin Compromiso El Amsterdammer, Saka did not comment on the blend. Neither did he go into specifics of the cigar.


The cigar looks great. The shape is beautiful. The wrapper is dark and oily. The veins are thin yet clear, but it fits the color and the shine. The ring looks handwritten. The cigar feels well constructed. We suspect that the same pair of rollers responsible for the Muestra de Saka Unicorn is responsible for the Chubby Unicorn as well. The aroma is woody.


The cold draw is amazing, even though only the cap was cut. The small opening gives an amazing draw though. The flavors are thick and nutty. The start is very leathery but with sweetness and cloves. Leather, soil, coffee, and spices held together by some sweetness if that comes after the initial puffs. Soon to be joined by some pepper and wood. Slowly the cigar evolves to more nutty flavors, as in the cold draw. But with wood, leather, spices, and pepper. The mouthfeel is thick and creamy. Some dark chocolate shows up as well. The leather makes a comeback right before the end of the first third. The second third is mostly nuts, with some soil, pepper, and wood. In the final third, the nut flavors are gone. It’s wood, leather, and pepper galore in the end.


The draw is phenomenal. The cigar produces a thick, full smoke in copious amounts. The burn is a little uneven though and had to be corrected. The salt and pepper colored ash is firm. The cigar is both full-bodied and full-flavored. It is well balanced though with a lot of character. The smoke time is three hours.

Would I smoke this cigar again? I wish

number93

Categories: 93, Fabrica de Tabacos Joya de Nicaragua, Nicaraguan cigars | Tags: , , , ,

Balmoral Serie Signaturas Paso Doble Brindis

Balmoral Serie Signaturas Paso Doble Brindis. That is a long name. But a beautiful idea. Collaborations have been going on for the longest time in the cigar industry. But in the last few years, more and more occur. Balmoral joined the collaboration train in 2018 when they launched the Balmoral Serie Signaturas. Their maiden release was a collaboration with Ernesto Perez Carrillo, called the Dueto. Ministry of Cigars reviewed that cigar. And for the second annual release, Royal Agio teamed up with La Flor Dominicana. Boris Wintermans from Agio and Litto Gomez from La Flor Dominicana had known each other for years and joined forces for the Balmoral Serie Signaturas Paso Doble. A three size limited edition release. We are reviewing the Perfecto, which is called the Brindis. Brindis means toast, so cheers.


The Paso Doble is named after a military march. Its speed allowed troops to give 120 steps per minute. This march gave rise to a traditional Spanish dance, a musical genre including both voice and instruments, and a genre of instrumental music often played during bullfighting. The cigar is made from Dominican fillers, and the binder is also Dominican. The tobacco comes from the farm of La Flor Dominicana. The wrapper is a dark Ecuadorian Habano. We are reviewing the Perfecto, which is called the Brindis. Brindis means toast, so cheers.


The cigar looks amazing. The shape is eye-catching. And the little knot on top of the cigar is a beautiful finishing touch. The rings are huge. Deep blue, popping gold and the Balmoral Añejo gray with white. The design and print quality is top-notch. The details are amazing, up to the signatures of Boris Wintermans and Litto Gomez. The dark wrapper looks oily and leathery, evenly colored as well. The cigar feels well constructed. The aroma is strong, it reminds us of hay, straw, farmland, and wood.


The cold draw is great, with flavors of salty potato chips and pepper. After lighting, it’s a sweet espresso with pepper. Some leather is involved as well with a little bit of chocolate. The flavors evolve to soil, coffee, leather, spices, and pepper. Slowly it continues to change, subtle, with a little cream, a little vanilla, more dark chocolate. The pepper is there, but it’s mellow. The flavors fluctuate in strength, sometimes the pepper is dominant, then it’s the coffee and chocolate, then the earthiness. There isn’t much evolution, yet it’s never boring. In the last third, there’s a little salt as well.


The draw is perfect. The ash is quite dark, yet firm. The burn needed a few touch-ups. The smoke is fine. The flavors are balanced, smooth yet full. Just like the strength, that’s full too. The smoke time is three and a half hours.

Would I buy this cigar again? I wish
number93

Categories: 93, Balmoral, Dominican cigars, Tabacalera La Flor | Tags: , , , , ,

Liga Privada Unico Feral Flying Pig

Liga Privada Unico Feral Flying Pig. Ever since the launch of the Flying Pig series, the cigars have been extremely popular. So popular that they became a regular production cigar. It started with the Liga Privada #9 Flying Pig, then the Liga Privada T52 Flying pig and in 2012, Drew Estate released a bigger version. That’s the Liga Privada Unico Feral Flying Pig. A 5⅜x60 version of the Flying Pig with a blend of his own. That’s why it’s part of the Unico series. Unico cigars are Liga Privada blends, tweaks from the #9 and T52 blends but still belong to the Liga Privada family.


Nowadays, almost all Drew Estate blends come out with a flying pig. The three different Undercrowns have Flying Pigs. I reviewed the Undercrown Shade, Sun Grown and Maduro Flying Pigs. But there are Flying Pigs for the Kentucky Fire Cured series and Herrera Esteli blends as well. But there is only one Feral Flying Pig, all the others are much smaller than this Feral Flying Pig. There’s only one illusive Feral Flying Pig Basher, which is a regular Feral Flying Pig with a different ring. That one was released for the wedding of Marvin Samel, one of the Drew Estate founders.

The cigar looks great. The shape is amazing and the pigtail finishes the cigar in style. A thick, oily, toothy, Colorado Maduro colored wrapper with a simple yet clear ring. Just a simple white with light gray backdrop for a dark gray FERAL print. Simple, effective, stylish. On the back of the ring, the Liga Privada logo is printed. There are also a few veins on the backside of the cigar. The cigar feels well constructed. The aroma is medium in strength. Dark wood, sawdust, and some dark chocolate aromas are coming from the cigar.

The cold draw is great. The flavors from the cold draw are raw tobacco and dark chocolate. At first, the mouthfeel is dry. The bitterness of coffee and soil, with some acidity. The coffee gets stronger while the mouthfeel gets a bit creamy. The Nicaraguan pepper shows up too. Once the burn passes the thinner part of the foot, other flavors start to emerge. The coffee and pepper remain, but there are hints of wood, leather, spices, and sweetness as well. After an inch, a metallic flavor shows up with leather and pepper. The flavors then evolve to oak, leather, tobacco, and coffee. And a slight hint of chocolate in the background. After a third, a mild sweet candy flavor is noticeable for a little while. A rare flavor that I never tasted in cigars before. It’s hard to pinpoint what it resembles, but puffy rice candy comes close. That flavor disappears soon though. Halfway it’s back to espresso, leather and some sweetness. The coffee, leather, and pepper remain the same until the end. The sweetness slowly turns into marzipan.

The draw is great. And the smoke is Drew Estate famous. Thick, full, copious amounts. The burn is pretty straight. The light gray ash is quite firm, yet a bit flaky. This is a full-flavored, full-bodied cigar. But balanced, so it’s not overpowering. The smoke time is four hours exactly

Would I buy this cigar again? Yes I will

number92

Categories: 92, Gran Fabrica Drew Estate, Liga Privada, Nicaraguan cigars | Tags: , , , , , ,

Partagas Salomones – Vintage –

In 2008 Habanos introduced the Partagas Salomones as a La Casa del Habano exclusive cigar. But the cigars were not new. They have been released as special releases before such as in the 1995 humidor. And in the late 1990s and early 2000s, you could buy bundles of these cigars on Cuba. Counterfeits weren’t as rampant as today, factories weren’t as strict as now. So it was possible to have real, good quality cigars with the correct blend outside of the regular production portfolio.

The Partagas Salomones has been a regular production since 2008. But exclusively sold in La Casa del Habano shops worldwide. With an extra LCDH ring of course. Other Partagas Salomones releases were the Salomones Espanola in the 1995 Partagas Espanola humidor. A smaller version, one inch smaller to be precise, was released in the Silo XXI Millennium Humidor from 1999. And the 2000 Partagas 155 Aniversario humidor had the 7¼x57 Partagas Salomones as well. Since the cigar that we are reviewing is from 2000, it’s most likely that it is an overproduction cigar for this humidor that was sold in a bundle.

The cigar looks great. The shape is amazing. The wrapper is Colorado colored, mild oily and only has one thin vein. The old Partagas ring is used. That means the cigar is pre-2002. That’s when the rings changed. The touch is great, the right amount of bounce when we softly squeeze the cigar. And the cigar has this mild grassy and hay aroma that you can only find in vintage cigars.

The cold draw is a bit tight, but that has to do with the shape. The flavor is leather with spice. Quite strong for a vintage cigar. Right from the start, I taste salt and leather. This is the leather that was so typical for Cubans back in the day. There’s also a very mild pepper and some cedar. Leather remains, a nice floral sweetness shines through. Complex, well balanced. The mouthfeel is very creamy. Mild cinnamon is there as well. A few puffs later, there is some toast. After an inch, there’s a faint flavor that comes close to Nutella. Hazelnut and chocolate, but it’s very faint. The dry, aged, leather is the base flavor, the other flavors dance around it. Sometimes it’s cedar, sometimes pepper. Sometimes floral flavors and then the chocolate again. All well balanced like a beautiful ballet performance. Sophisticated is the right way to describe the flavors. After a third, the pepper becomes a bit more prominent. Not that it comes close to being a pepper bomb, it remains subtle. Chocolate becomes stronger too, slowly. In the last third, the sweetness is stronger. Almost like drinking a nice, small sip of sugar water. But still, with the leather and pepper. The sweetness mellows out, the pepper gains some strength. The flavors get a little salty as well.

The draw is great. The light-colored ash is firm. The smoke is good. It’s not a Drew Estate smoke bomb, but the smoke is medium in thickness and volume. The burn is straight. The cigar is medium bodied, medium flavored. Very complex, subtle and sophisticated. Delicate almost. And it shows how good Cuban cigars can be if the tobacco is treated the right way. If the soil is well maintained. If no shortcuts are taken in the fermentation and aging. And when quality control is at a high level. The smoke time is three hours and thirty minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? Buying a rare 19-year-old cigar is impossible

number93

Categories: 93, Cuban cigars, Partagas (Habanos) | Tags: , , , ,

Debonaire Maduro First Degree

Debonaire is the brand of Philip Zanghi. Zanghi first made his steps into the cigar industry in the 1990s in a partnership with Rocky Patel. They were both new to the business. With Zanghi’s connection with Indian Motorcycles, they formed Indian Tobac. In a later stage, Patel bought Zanghi’s shares. Zanghi ventured into other parts of the tobacco industry.

But returned to cigars in 2011 with Debonaire. First only with the Habano, but in 2014 he released the Debonaire Maduro too. And now there’s a third blend, Daybreak, with a Connecticut Shade wrapper.

The Debonaire Maduro is made at the De Los Reyes factory on the Dominican Republic. That factory is owned by the Reyes family. The 5th generation Reyes has entered the business, and that says a lot about the long lasting love affair with tobacco. For the filler Dominican and Nicaraguan tobacco is used. The binder is also from the Dominican. The wrapper comes from the USA. It’s a Connecticut Broadleaf Maduro.

The dark wrapper is toothy and rough. It could easily be mistaken for Brazilian Mata Fina by the looks. But the aroma is good and strong. There is a strong earthy smell to the cigar with some pepper. The shape is great and makes the cigar look cute. That little tampered foot eases the rough look on the wrapper. It’s like an ugly kid with a cute outfit that makes it adorable. The construction feels good.


The cold draw is surprisingly good. With that tampered foot, a tighter cold draw was expected. The flavors are very peppery. The first hit is a strong earthy coffee. Once the cigar opens up, the Maduro sweetness shines through too. There’s also a hint of extra dark chocolate. That chocolate is slowly becoming the dominant flavor. The flavors remain practically the same all throughout the cigar. The bigger sizes will probably offer more variety in flavor. The finale brings strong bittersweet chocolate with some wood.

The draw is great. The smoke is thick and full. The color is a bit off-white. The ash is quite dark. The burn was straight until one side hit a big vein. Then it gets crooked and had to be corrected. This is a medium-full flavored and bodied cigar. The smoke time is an hour.

Would I buy this cigar again? Yes, for the occasions where I don’t have a lot of time.

number90

Categories: 90, De Los Reyes, Debonaire, Dominican cigars | Tags: , , , ,

Joya de Nicaragua Cinco Decadas Diadema

That’s one of the two vitolas that Joya de Nicaragua released of this blend. And the Cinco Decadas stands for the 50th anniversary of the factory. Opened in 1968 and still standing. It’s the oldest factory in Nicaragua and carries a lot of history. Even though the factory has been renovated and restored after the revolution, there are still bullet holes in the building. During the renovation, those were preserved. To remind everybody about that era, from 1979 to 1990. Esteli was one of the epicenters of the revolution. And the Joya de Nicaragua factory was the highest building in town. So it was used as a sniper outpost, and therefore being shot at a lot too. Yet the building survived, and Joya de Nicaragua is bigger and stronger than ever.

Last year, at the 50th birthday of Joya de Nicaragua, the company released a book. And this line. Both called Cinco Decadas, five decades. The book was written by Nick Hammond, click here for an interview. Joya de Nicaragua did not reveal much about the cigar. They only said that some of their best Nicaraguan tobacco is used in the blend. But not what kind of tobacco. Or if it’s a 100% Nicaraguan cigar. There are only two vitolas, this diadema, and a 7×50 Churchill. Again with a link to history, as these are vitolas rolled back in the day as well. The cigars have been received well, with scores high in the 90 by several established magazines and blogs.


The cigar is dark. And oily. With a beautiful wrapper, smooth yet intimidating. The shape is fantastic with a beautiful pointy head. The creme colored ring with golden details and the name in red is classic yet modern, it fits the brand and the blend. The construction feels good. The aroma is medium strong, And it smells like hay or straw in a musty shed.


The cold draw is great, even though only a small part was clipped. There are some leather and some sweetness in the cold draw. As well as a raw tobacco flavor. From the moment the cigar is lit, it’s all coffee. Strong, dark roast coffee. Then it turns to coffee, pepper, leather, and chocolate. This cigar starts strong. There are subtle hints of hay, sweetness, wood, and spices, that all come and go with each puff. The flavors are well balanced. After third, dark chocolate with coffee become the main flavors. Supported by leather and pepper. And sweetness best compared to dried fruits. All balanced by nice citrus acidity. Slowly a little mustiness shows up, but it’s not a Connecticut Shade mustiness. It’s different. The last third starts with a balanced, complex, dark chocolate flavor and pepper. The mouthfeel is creamy. There’s a hint of vanilla in the smoke too. There’s also that citrus acidity and some hay. A mild salty flavor is there as well.

The draw is fantastic. The smoke is good, but a little thicker and more voluminous would have been fitting. The ash is white in color. Unfortunately, it’s not very firm. The burn is straight and slow. Keep puffing though, to keep the cigar lit. This is not a cigar you can rest and come back to a few minutes later. This cigar is full bodied, full flavored. Joya wanted to create something special for their 50th anniversary and clearly succeeded.

Would I buy this cigar again? Even though it has a high price, I want a box.

number95

Categories: 95, Fabrica de Tabacos Joya de Nicaragua, Joya de Nicaragua, Nicaraguan cigars | Tags: , , , ,

Patoro Serie P Jeroboam

Patoro Serie P Jeroboam. This is a Swiss cigar brand. But the cigars are Dominican made. They are made at De Los Reyes. Other brands that are made at that factory are Puros de Hostos, Indian Motorcycle, Debonaire, Saga and more. Ministry of Cigars reviewed the Saga Short Tales Tomo VI, Debonaire Habano, Debonaire Maduro, and the Indian Motorcycle Maduro from the same factory. And now the Patoro Serie P Jeroboam, which is a perfecto shaped cigar. The filler and binder are Dominican. The wrapper is Cameroon according to the Patoro website. But there are a few vitolas exclusively for the American market. And those are wrapped in a Brazilian Maduro wrapper.

When we bought this cigar, we didn’t know anything about it. It was recommended by a retailer in The Netherlands. He had got them in, we never smoked it, so we bought a few to review. Something unknown, odd shape, why not try it? With a price tag of 11 euro, it’s not a cheap cigar and it’s probably hard to find now. Patoro is no longer available on the Dutch market as the distributor stopped selling premium long fillers (again). And no other distributor has taken on the brand yet.

The shape looks cool. Because of the curve at the foot of the cigar, it looks a bit like the Opus X Chili Pepper. Yet not as curved as that cigar. The ring is simple, glossy orange with a P and a star. No further information. The oily wrapper has a few veins. The construction feels good. The aroma is good. A mixture of chocolate, pepper, and wood.

For the shape, the cold draw is surprisingly easy. And it tastes peppery yet sweet. Once lit, the flavors are coffee with sweetness and leather. Then some nice spices show up. All-spice, cinnamon, and gingerbread. All quite sweet but pleasantly sweet. The mouthfeel is dry. The flavors remain the same in the first half, but then wood shows up. Still with the spice and some pepper. The sweetness remains strong as well. Slowly there’s more leather and even a little vanilla.

The draw is great. The burn is beautiful. And the light-colored ash is firm. The smoke is nice white and plentiful. This is a medium-full bodied cigar. The flavors are also medium-full. And well rounded. The smoke time is two hours.

Would I buy this cigar again? 11 euro is a bit too high priced. If it was 8 euro I would not hesitate.

number90

Categories: 90, De Los Reyes, Dominican cigars, Patoro | Tags: , , , , ,

Undercrown Flying Pig

This cigar was released in 2012, in The Netherlands. The name was Undercrown Flying Pig XRL. XLF stood for Extremely Rare Limited. Less than 200 boxes of 12 were released. And flew off the shelves like hotcakes. it was a release for Compaenen. Compaenen is a cooperation of independent tobacco shops in The Netherlands. They combine their buying power to negotiate exclusive releases for the participating shop. Pre-releases, private label cigars and limited editions such as the Undercrown Flying Pig XLR.

Two years later, Drew Estate released the Undercrown Flying Pig in the United States. And the cigar has been a hit there as well. And everywhere else where it’s been released. At first, it was a limited edition, now it’s a regular production cigar. The wrapper is a Mexican San Andres Maduro leaf. The binder is a stalk cut Habano from the Connecticut River Valley in the United States. The fillers come from Nicaragua and Brazil.

The cigar looks great. That shape, as we mentioned in the reviews of the Undercrown Shade Flying Pig and the Undercrown Sun Grown Flying Pig, is a favorite. And again, the color scheme of the ring fits the wrapper like a glove. The dark, matte, blue with the gold on that dark wrapper is a perfect match. The pigtail is a nice touch. The wrapper is leathery. The aroma is of dark chocolate and spices.

The cold draw is perfect. It has a flavor of raw tobacco. Once lit, it’s leather, chocolate, green herbs, and coffee. After a few puffs, leather and pepper are the main flavors. But on the background, there’s still faint dark chocolate as well. The flavors open up and become stronger. Pepper, wood, leather, chocolate, and hay. The flavors are spicy and full, with a mild buttery mouthfeel.

The draw is great and this is a classic Drew Estate smoke bomb. Thick, white, full smoke. Enough to get a response from the fire department. The burn isn’t perfect, but also not bad. The salt and pepper colored ash is firm. The cigar is full flavored and full bodied. The smoke time is two hours and ten minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? Yes

number92

Categories: 92, Gran Fabrica Drew Estate, Nicaraguan cigars, Undercrown | Tags: , , , ,

Undercrown Sun Grown Flying Pig

After the huge success of the Liga Privada offspring Undercrown, Drew Estate decided to build on that brand. So a few years later, the Undercrown Shade was released. I reviewed that cigar a few days ago.

So it wasn’t a question if there would be a third Undercrown blend. The question was “what will it be?”. And the follow-up question was “when will it be released?”. Well, it became the Undercrown Sun Grown. And it was released in 2017.

Just like the Liga Privada blends and the regular Undercrown, the Sun Grown utilizes stalk-cut tobacco. That means that the leaves are not picked from the plant. The whole plant is cut down and then hung to try, upside down. Only the Undercrown Shade doesn’t use stalk-cut tobacco. A flying pig in the new Undercrown blend was a must. So the rollers at the Gran Fabrica Drew Estate made the signature shape for the new blend as well.

The cigar looks amazing. The shape is cool. The pigtail is the icing on the cake. The ring is beautiful. And just like with the shade, the color scheme fits the wrapper. The Colorado colored wrapper matches well with the burgundy and gold rings. The wrapper has a mild shine from natural oils. A few thin veins, and it’s a looker. The aroma is strong. It smells like hay, straw, and sheep.

The cold draw is easy. With a spicy fried grass flavor. Once lit its classic espresso, leather, and pepper. All with a drop of citrus. The flavors then change to hay, leather, wood and some nutmeg. The mouthfeel is dry. Caramel like sweetness on the background. When the burn reaches the wider part of the cigars, the flavors burst out. A nice lemon acidity, pepper, toast, wood, and leather. And then some dark chocolate with pepper. And later even some nuts. The flavors are full but refined. No harshness, well rounded. After a third, the mouthfeel becomes a little creamy. The sweetness is mild. With the pepper, it supports the nutty flavor.

The draw is great. The cigar is a classic Drew Estate smoke bomb. Don’t smoke this cigar in an unventilated room. The light-colored ash is firm. This is a full bodied, full flavored cigar. The smoke time is an amazing two and a half hours.

Would I buy this cigar again? Yes

number93

Categories: 93, Gran Fabrica Drew Estate, Nicaraguan cigars, Undercrown | Tags: , , , , , , ,

Undercrown Shade Flying Pig

By now, the story of the Flying Pig is probably known. When Drew Estate started making cigars, people said that they would only become successful when pigs would fly. And successful they became. Then Steve Saka, back then CEO of Drew Estate, found the Flying Pig vitola. He was in Tampa and found a 100-year-old catalog from an old cigar factory., That catalog had the Flying Pig vitola, but under another name. Saka decided to make the cigars, in the Liga Privada #9 blend as a limited edition. And as a salute to the naysayers, the cigars were called Flying Pigs.

The Liga Privada lines were so popular that Drew Estate asked the rollers to stop smoking them. So the rollers switched some tobaccos, leaving out the rare ones. That line became the Undercrown. And the Undercrown got so popular that offshoots appeared. The second Undercrown blend to be released was the Undercrown Shade. That’s a milder version of the Undercrown blend, with a Connecticut Shade wrapper from Ecuador. The binder is Sumatra. The fillers come from Nicaragua and the Dominican Republic. Drew Estate released a sampler with three different Undercrown Flying Pigs. Royal Agio, the distributor of Drew Estate in several European countries, provided me with a sampler.

The cigar looks great. The shape is unique and the pigtail is the icing on the cake when it comes to looks. The cigar feels good. The Connecticut Shade wrapper has a mild shine. The veins are thin. The white with the gold color scheme for the rings are well chosen. It fits the color of the wrapper. The logo is great too, an upside-down crown with a lion’s face. The aroma isn’t mild. It’s spicy, herbal and strong. But also smells like straw.

The cold draw is good, with a raw tobacco flavor. Once lit, a mild coffee and leather flavor is tasted. With salt that is. There’s also some cedar wood. But the flavors are smooth like the volume isn’t cracked open. Elevator music in a cigar, that idea. After a few puffs, there is some acidity and grass. The mouthfeel is mild creamy. Once the cigar opens up when the burn is passed the small foot, the flavors get stronger. Nutmeg, a bit of pepper, leather but also that Connecticut Shade mustiness. And that last part is the downside of all Connecticut Shade cigars. After a third some marzipan sweetness shows up, faint and on the background. The final third packs a little more power. Sweetness, pepper, leather, and wood. But still creamy with a little salt. The mustiness tones down a lot.

The draw is good. The burn is great. The ash is white and firm. The smoke is nothing like other Drew Estate products. Drew Estate is known for its smoke bombs. But this Undercrown Shade Flying Pig produces just a medium volume of smoke. It is not very thick, and gray instead of white. The cigar is mild to medium flavored. It’s also medium bodied. The smoke time is two hours.

Would I buy this cigar again? I will never buy any Connecticut Shade cigars again.

number88

Categories: 88, Gran Fabrica Drew Estate, Nicaraguan cigars, Undercrown | Tags: , , , , , ,

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