Posts Tagged With: Gordo

Joya de Nicaragua Cinco Dedacas El Embargo

Joya de Nicaragua Cinco Dedacas El Embargo. That is a mouth full. Not just by name, but also by size, a 6×60. This cigar is exclusively for Europe. And the name suits, as Europe was the continent where Joya de Nicaragua sold its cigars when the Reagan presidency installed an embargo against Nicaragua and the Sandinista regime. The embargo was in place until 1990.

The Joya de Nicaragua Cinco Decadas blend stems from the 50th anniversary of the oldest cigar factory in Nicaragua. It is part of the Obras Maestras selection, the best Joya de Nicaragua has to offer. As for the blend, nobody but the master blenders at Joya de Nicaragua know. The blend is a company secret. The cigars come in boxes of ten and are available exclusively in Europe.

It’s a 6×60 but at first glance, it doesn’t look much bigger than the toro due to the semi box press. The beautiful oily wrapper is dark and leathery. The cream color of the ring with the red and golden print is beautiful as well. The cigar feels well constructed. The aroma is medium strong. Darm wood with green herbs is the best way to describe the aroma.

The cold draw is fine with dry spices. The first flavors are toast, leather, with spices. The flavors slowly intensify. After a while, coffee and a hint of vanilla appear. Slowly towards the end of the first third, the mouthfeel gets thick and meaty. With more wood, spice, and pepper. The cigar picks up more coffee and spice. With some earthiness, wood, and leather. It’s getting stronger. The final third starts with coffee and soil. The cigar is too strong to retrohale. The finale is earthy, woody, with coffee and pepper.

The draw is great. Thanks to the semi box-press the 60 ring gauge isn’t that bad. The ash is light in color and quite firm. The burn is beautiful and the smoke is thick. It is a full-body cigar with lots of flavors. The smoke time is two hours and forty minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? I’d take the Diadema over this size. But it is a great smoke.

Categories: 91, Fabrica de Tabacos Joya de Nicaragua, Joya de Nicaragua, Nicaraguan cigars | Tags: , , , , ,

Pachuche Liga Azul Tronco

Pachuche Liga Azul Tronco, a big cigar hailing from the Dominican Republic but it’s a Swiss cigar brand. And strongly enough, there are quite a few cigar brands with roots in Switzerland. Davidoff is the most famous one. But brands as ADVentura, Gilbert de Montsalvat, Vegas de Santiago, El Sueno, Patoro, Cavalier Geneve, and Skull 77 all have their roots in the Central European country. So does Pachuche.

The Liga Azul is the third blend that the company released. There are four blends available at the moment, all made at Tabacalera William Ventura. This Liga Azul is the mildest and smoothest with an Ecuadorian Connecticut Shade wrapper. All the other tobacco is from the Dominican Republic. The artwork on the cigar is designed by the half Mexican, half Swiss artist Patrick Küng, a childhood friend of brand founder Camillo Bazzell. Küng used his Mexican heritage as an inspiration

The wrapper is pale, yellowish-brown like autumn leaves. The greenish right with the Cinco de Mayo kind of skull is a big contrast with the bright metallic blue foot band that says Liga Azul in big, white letters. For the size, the cigar feels very light. Yet there are no soft spots or signs of underfilling of the cigar. The head is quite flat. The cigar has this manure aroma, which is quite strong.

The cold draw is quite loose and brings sweetness to the palate. Once lit, the cigar gives hay and immediately that musty old book flavor of Connecticut Shade wrappers. There is a mild sweet creaminess to the cigar as well. Slowly some acidity shows up with a hint of white pepper. Slowly the flavors change to cedar and earthiness. Still with that typical Connecticut Shade mustiness though. The cigar is very smooth and mild. The mouthfeel is very creamy, which is pleasant. The flavors remain the same until halfway when a little bit of leather and green herbs show up. But it’s all mellow and smooth. There is a hint to toasted bread every few puffs as well. In the final third, the cream and sweetness return. But with some pepper and nuts.

The draw is a bit on the loose side. But it is still within acceptable margins. The ash is like a stack of dimes, beautifully layers of ash in different tones of gray. The smoke is thick and full. The burn is razor-sharp. This cigar does have balance and a lot of smoothness. It is a mild to medium smoke in strength, medium flavored. The smoke time is two hours and fifteen minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? It’s still a Connecticut Shade cigar.

Categories: 90, Dominican cigars, Pachuche, Tabacalera William Ventura | Tags: , , ,

Balmoral Añejo XO Gordo

Balmoral Añejo XO Gordo. In 2014, Royal Agio launched the Balmoral Añejo XO series. It was the follow up for the every successful Balmoral Añejo 18 release. The latter had an 18-year-old Brazilian wrapper. But when Royal Agio ran out of that wrapper, they created the Balmoral Añejo XO, still with aged tobacco but in larger supply. And the line was a success from the start. Worldwide, and it put the Balmoral brand on the map in the United States.


Today, there are 4 different Balmoral Añejo lines. The Añejo XO, the Añejo XO Connecticut, Oscuro, and Nicaragua. But the Balmoral Añejo XO Gordo was used as an event-only cigar in several countries. Due to the Covid-19 crisis, Royal Agio decided to release the cigar to all retailers last month. With so many people working from home, and more time on their hands, they could enjoy this Gordo without having to go to events. Events that are prohibited in most countries anyway during the pandemic.


The cigar is impressive. Big, thick, and aggressively looking. Brazilian Arapiraca tobacco isn’t the smoothest looking tobacco in the world. It’s rough and tough-looking with veins. It’s the Danny Trejo under the tobaccos. The ring makes up for it though. contemporary design. Gray, off white and gold. Stylish. The foot ring is in the same style. The cigar feels well constructed, evenly spongy all over. The aroma is peppery with dark chocolate.


The cold draw is very easy. The cigar has a dry tobacco flavor. After lighting there’s an immediate flavor explosion. Coffee, pepper, and sweetness. Slowly a mild spice shows up, herbal almost, with some leather. The herbal flavor starts to dominate and is supported by charred wood and earthiness. Some salt shows up as well, and the mouthfeel is mild creamy. After a third, there’s pepper, wood, grass, and some spices. The sweetness then reappears with more spices, wood, leather, and pepper. The wood flavor is a bit charred, like barbecue.


The draw is open, light, easy. Too open. There is a lot of smoke, white but it’s a little thin though. The burn has to be corrected several times as well. The cigar is smooth and mellow. Due to the wrapper filler ratio, the cigar lacks a bit of character. It is milder than the smaller sizes of the same blend. The cigar is medium-bodied, medium flavored. The smoke time is three hours and thirty minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? The blend yes, the size no!

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Categories: 89, Agio Caribbean Tobacco Company, Balmoral, Dominican cigars | Tags: , , , ,

Neya F8 Gringo Ligero Typhoon

Neya F8 Gringo Ligero Typhoon. Roberto P. Duran has been in tobacco all of his life, and so have his ancestors. The family roots in tobacco trace back to the 1920s in Cuba. The Robert P. Duran brand might not be one of the first brands that pop up when you speak to cigar smokers in Europe or the USA. But the brand is very popular in South East Asia. It has a strong fan base in Malaysia, Indonesia, and Singapore. Ministry of Cigars joined the CSWC qualifier in Kuala Lumpur. Inclusive of the ticket was a 5 count cigar caddy and a few cigars. This cigar, the Neya F8 Gringo was one of the cigars included in the package. It’s made by Nicatabaco and Robert P. Duran.

The cigar has an Ecuadorian Corojo Maduro wrapper. The fillers and binders are grown in Nicaragua. The wrapper is most likely from Duran’s own Azan plantation. The Duran family grows tobacco in Ecuador. The line was released in 2014, shortly after the Neya Classic line. The F8 is supposed to be the amped-up version of the Neya Classic. It replaces the Ecuador Habano wrapper with this Corojo Maduro. There are seven lines available, we are reviewing the 5×58 Gringo

The cigar looks good. A dark leathery wrapper with tooth and some veins. A beautiful deep blue ring with golden details and the drawing of a lady. The secondary ring shows the F8 logo and says Ligero typhoon. That promises some strength. The cigar feels well constructed. The aroma is strong. Barnyard and burned wood is the smell of the cigar.

The cold draw is fantastic. And gives a slightly sweet espresso flavor. After lighting, the espresso is strong. The right amount of bitterness softened with some sweetness. It’s a great start. There’s also a hint of leather. The flavors remind me of old school coffee-flavored candy that I used to like as a kid. There’s also a little bit of pepper and some fruity acidity. After a while, the flavors change to toast, coffee, leather with that fruity aftertaste. Slowly the flavors become a little less strong and a little spicier. After a third, a mild vanilla taste is noticeable next to the spice and pepper. The flavors are strong yet mellow and smooth. With a creamy mouthfeel. The vanilla disappears again. Due to the big ring gauge, the cigar isn’t very dynamic, but the coffee, leather, wood, pepper, sweetness, and citrus mixture is very nice.


The draw is fantastic. The ash is white and firm. The smoke is medium in volume and thickness. The burn is good. This is a strong cigar, yet balanced. Full-bodied, full-flavored. The smoke time is three hours and twenty minutes

Would I buy this cigar again? Yes, I want a box
number91

Categories: 91, Neya, Nicaraguan cigars, Nicatabaco | Tags: , , , ,

Hiram & Solomon Traveling Man Gran Toro

Hiram & Solomon Traveling Man Gran Toro. Hiram & Solomon is the brand of Fouad Kashouty and Nasir Dakrat. The couple met during freemason gatherings. And they became friends. Both cigar aficionados were surprised that they could not find any freemason cigars. So they decided to create a brand that uses the freemason shield in the logo. And in freemason spirit, parts of the proceeds will flow back into the community through charity.


The Traveling Man is made at the Plasencia factory in Esteli, Nicaragua. David Blanco from Blanco Cigars was involved in the blending of the cigar. And the blend is interesting because of the use of Indonesian Sumatra. Most Sumatra tobacco used comes from Ecuador. Yet for the Traveling Man, Hiram & Solomon use Sumatra from the Indonesian island of Sumatra. Add an Indonesian binder. And Brazilian, Dominican and Nicaraguan wrapper and you have the Hiram & Solomon Travelling Man. The Gran Toro size is 6×60.

The cigar looks good. I like the purple ring with the Freemason logo. The cigar has a nice shade of color and just two thin veins on the backside. The construction feels good. The aroma is strong. I smell hay and straw.

The cold draw is great. The hay and grass flavor is strong in the cold draw. After lighting, the first flavors are best described as dusty and earthy with some sweetness. There’s also a slight hint of pepper. The marzipan sweetness is fantastic. After a few puffs, some leather shows up too. And some grass. The mouthfeel is a little buttery. In the first third, the flavors stay consistent but that’s expected with a big ring cigar. The flavors maintain in the second third, although I taste some licorice too. There are slight changes, subtle, with some vanilla showing up every now and then. Same goes for pepper, but overall this is a consistent cigar. The final third is much better. The pepper picks up, allspice shows up and it’s good.


The draw is flawless. The burn is straight. The ash is light colored and firm enough. The smoke is quite thin. This is a medium bodied, medium flavored cigar. The smoke time is three hours.

Would I buy this cigar again? Only in a thinner version

number89

Categories: 89, Hiram & Solomon, Nicaraguan cigars | Tags: , , , , ,

Manowar Anthology Sampler: Manowar Side Project Phalanx

The next 9 days I will be working my way through the beautiful Man O’ war Anthology sampler, a 9 cigar sampler with several Man O’ War blends and vitolas, released by Meier & Dutch and made in Esteli, Nicaragua by the famous cigar blender and factory owner Abdel ‘A.J.’ Fernandez.


The first cigar is the 6 1/2×56 Man O’ War Side Project Phalanx, made with a Pennsylvania Broadleaf wrapper, an Habano binder from Honduras and Habano fillers from both Nicaragua and Honduras. The cigar was originally released early 2012, I have no idea what the box code of this sampler is, but it has aged for minimum of two years.


The cigar looks intimidating, a dark, almost black, dull, leathery wrapper, add the big ring gauge and the length, the ring with the warrior with the metal mask in a brushed golden color, the red mohawk and an additional ring in black with gray blue banner saying Phalanx. The construction feels good, the cigar is well finished. The aroma surprises me, the cigar smells the way it looks, like dry leather and it’s not that strong.


The cold draw is a bit tight after cutting the cigar. I taste some gingerbread in the cold draw. After lighting I taste soil with gingerbread. After three puffs that gingerbread is gone, I’m stuck with the muddy soil. After half a centimeter the gingerbread is back.  After a third I taste wood with some sweetness, aspertam like, and a little spice in the aftertaste. Halfway the flavors are a bit milder and there’s a bit of a low quality milk chocolate too. Slowly some spices show up, some pepper and cumin. The base flavor is woody. Near the end I taste licorice and some mint.


The draw is fantastic. The smoke is medium thick but not exactly white.  The ash is though, and its firm too. The burn is amazing. The cigar is medium in both body and flavor. There isn’t enough evolution to satisfy me. The smoke time is two hours.

Would I buy this cigar again? I like the cigar but dislike the vitola, it’s too thick for me.

Score: 90

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Categories: 90, Manowar, Nicaraguan cigars, Tabacalera A.J. Fernandez | Tags: , , , , , ,

Corona Dominican 10th Anniversary Phatty

When I made my first trip to the USA in the spring of 2009 I landed in heaven when I walked into Corona Cigar Company at their West Sand Lake store in Orlando, I had never seen so many cigars in my life, and a lot of them were unknown for me coming from a country that has limited room for brands and back then most of the cigars sold were Cubans, something that changed dramatically in the years after though. And the shop has been a stable hang out for me every time I visited the USA since. Since it’s the owner Jeff’s birthday I’m publishing this review today.


During one of my trips, and I am guessing it was the 2011 trip, I bought a sampler of their 10th anniversary cigars, a sampler with a variety of different blends and sizes and amongst them was this Corona Dominican Selection 10th Anniversary Phatty, a 6×60 Connecticut Shade wrapped cigar. And I never touched it for two reasons, the 60 ring gauge and the Connecticut Shade wrapper, but lately I started to enjoy the latter so why not light it? If it doesn’t meet up to my prefered taste then at least I get a review out of it and will light a cigar I love later.


The wrapper feels very silky but also bumpy like a klingon queen, so I guess the binder was very rough. The wrapper has a mild shine to it. The construction feels good but the head has a weird bump on it, it almost looks like the binder had a pig tail and the wrapper was rolled over it. The aroma is strong, much stronger than I expected, and reminds me of a sour hay with a little hint of ammonia. The ring is nice, golden with an embossed 10 at the bottom, red stripes on the top part with the Corona logo in red on a white background.


I cut the cigar with my xikar cutter and the cold draw is easy with a mild straw and raisin flavor. Right after lighting the cigar, with my soft flame of course, I taste coffee, hay, a little honey and some pepper but with the classic Connecticut shade mustiness. After a centimeter I taste musty cedar with pepper. After a third I taste nuts with some cedar with a bit of salt and pepper, the flavors are a little harsh but not in an unpleasant way. Slowly the pepper gains strength and a cedar flavor joins the flavor palate. After two thirds I also taste quite a strong lemon flavor.


The draw is a little bit loose, for my personal preference it could use a little more resistance but I guess the big ring gauge is part of the cause. The smoke is full and thick, just as I like it. The light gray ash is a bit coarse but pretty dense and firm. The burn is pretty straight for the first inch but then starts to get a little crooked. The cigar is medium bodied, medium full flavored. The smoke time is an hour and forty minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? Since you can get them for just $3 this is a great humidor filler. And they make great cigars for the non smokers or incidental smokers.

Score: 89
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Categories: 89, Corona, Dominican cigars | Tags: , , , ,

Montecristo Monte Gordo

Montecristo is a household name in the cigar industry and the Montecristo #2 is one of the best known cigars around the world. But that’s the Cuban Montecristo! There’s also a non Cuban Montecristo, like a lot of Cuban brands with non Cuban copycats, although calling them copycats might not be fair as some of the brands were started by the owners of the Cuban counterparts after they had to flee the island when the Castro regime took over. By now all those brands are in the hands of the big players Altadis and General Cigars, which is a part of STG.


This Monte by Montecristo is made in the Dominican Republic for Altadis, owner of the brand. The wrapper is an Ecuadorean Habano, the cigar has a double binder coming from both the Dominican and Nicaragua and Dominican filler tobacco. I don’t know where I got this cigar, it must have been a gift as I would never buy a 6×60 and would stay away from non Cuban counterparts as my experience with those isn’t too favorable, except for the Partagas Spanish Rosado.


The cigar looks good, the size is impressive, intimidating and the medium brown, mild glossy wrapper has a beautiful structure, it looks great. The cigar feels evenly packed and well rolled. The aroma is strong and its like standing in a haystack, dried grass, straw, hay. The ring is glossy brown with a golden line and a flor de lis in the middle, a white circle around it and the letters Montecristo. It looks like the Cuban ring but on glossy paper, a little bigger and the Habana is changed for a curly MC. There is a second ring, glossy black with golden outlines and a red font with golden shadow saying Monte. I feel that the black and the brown don’t match, if I was the designer I would have turned the black into the same brown as the regular Montecristo ring.


Due to the big ring gauge I opted for a punch and the cold draw is fine. I taste a dull sultana flavor with a hint of white pepper. After lighting I taste a honey dipped oak with some fresh chili. The flavors are a bit weak and flat. The honey is the strongest flavor and that’s still mild and muted. After a third the still muted flavors are oak, some pepper, some toast all with a tiny honey twist to it. After a third the pepper grows a bit, the oak is still there with a little bit of lemon.


The draw is fine, a little loose like expected with this 60 ring gauge. I still don’t like this size, anything over 54 is too thick for me. The ash is beautiful, dense, firm and white. The smoke is on the thin side of medium. The burn is a bit off. The cigar is flat, not dynamic but that’s expected of a big ring cigar. I would call this cigar medium bodied and medium flavored. After two hours and ten minutes I still have over an inch left but I’m so bored with this cigar that I tossed it.

Would I buy this cigar again? No, no dynamic, muted flavors. I’d try a smaller ring of the same blend though.

Score: 79
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Categories: 79, Dominican cigars, La Romana, Montecristo | Tags: , , ,

Reel Grande Torpedo

Now this is a cigar that lives up to its name, it’s huge. And i’m not a fan of huge cigars. Don’t get me wrong, I don’t mind long cigars but I do mind thick cigars as 99 out of a 100 times it’s a waste of good tobacco and I never understood the appeal of the ‘big, bigger, biggest’ rat race that was going on in the land of cigars the last few years.


I don’t know much about this cigar, except that it was given to me a few years ago by a friend and that it’s made in Nicaragua by Plasencia. I don’t know if they released it themselves, if it was a private label and if so, for who it was made. I don’t know the filler, the binder nor the wrapper, all I know is that it was a budget cigar and that I had it in my humidor for a minimum of 8 years.


The Real Grande Torpedo is a 7×60 pyramid with a rough, thin, sun grown wrapper that feels dry. The shape is a little off, the cigar won’t stand up straight on a flat surface. The ring is decent though, burgundy with black, yellow and gold. It says it’s a limited edition.  The cigar has a mild smell that reminds me of a vanilla lemon cake.


Well, due to the vitola my only option is to cut. The cold draw is good, tasteless though. After lighting I taste a mild coffee, very mild. The flavor is unrefined and slightly harsh. After half an inch the cigar is harsh with a very musty cedar. Halfway I taste bitter wood with some floral sweetness.


The draw is fine. The dense ash it light gray. The smoke is thin and low in volume. The burn is decent. This medium bodied, medium flavored cigar has hardly any evolution. The smoke time is an hour and forty minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? No. And why do cigar manufacturers release cigars like this with horrible tobacco? Where is your pride? What is your goal? Cigars like this will not sell and kill your reputation!

Score: 80

Red balloons with ribbon - Number 80

Red balloons with ribbon – Number 80

 

Categories: 80, Nicaraguan cigars, Reel Grande, Tabacos de Oriente Nicaragua | Tags: , , , ,

Cigar of the month July

July was a month of 21 published reviews, here’s the list from best to worst, with a surprising winner

The cigar with the highest rating last month is:

Gurkha Havana Blend Toro with a 93 score

Now as for the complete list of cigars I published:

1) Gurkha Havana Blend Toro (Nicaragua) 93 points
2) Don Pepin Garcia series JJ Toro (Nicaragua) 93 points
3) Espinosa Maduro Corona Gorda (Nicaragua) 93 points
4) Joya de Nicaragua Cuatro Cinco OR Toro (Nicaragua) 92 points
5) El Centurion Toro (Nicaragua) 92 points
6) Bucanero Z Toro (Nicaragua) 92 points
7) Jaime Garcia Reserva Especial Toro (Nicaragua) 91 points
8) Quesada Reserva Privada Oscuro Toro (Dominican Republic) 91 points
9) Wilson Adams Mr. Wilson Lancero (Nicaragua) 91 points
10) Mbombay Vintage Reserve Salomon (Costa Rica) 91 points
11) Bucanero Z Churchill (Nicaragua) 91 points
12) El Criolito Half Corona (Dominican Republic) 91 points
13) Don Pepin Garcia Blue Toro (Nicaragua) 90 points
14) La Antiguedad Toro (Nicaragua) 90 points
15) Punch LE 2013 (Cuba) 90 points
16) Alec Bradley Tempus Naturel Robusto (Honduras) 90 points
17) Don Payo El Baron Toro (Nicaragua) 89 points
18) E.P. Carrillo Encore Robusto (Dominican Republic) 89 points
19) Royal Danish Havana Blend Robusto (Nicaragua) 88 points
20) Vegas de Santiago Gran Reserva Gordo (Costa Rica) 84 points
21) Navarre Petit Robusto (France) 82 points

Categories: Cigar of the month | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

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