Posts Tagged With: Habano

Bugatti Signature Robusto

Bugatti Signature Robusto. Yet, you read that well. A cigar with the Bugatti name. But the Italian German car brand is not just making cars. They entered the luxury market too with bags, cigar accessories, and cigars. Cigars are made at the Blue Star factory from Abe Flores. Known for the PDR, A. Flores, and Flores y Rodriguez cigars. Last year, I reviewed the Bugatti Ambassador. This review is for another Bugatti cigar, the Signature. Bugatti is not the only car brand in the cigar market. Bentley makes cigars with Joya de Nicaragua. Porsche is in the accessory business just as Lamborghini. There are Ferrari accessories as well, but we don’t know if those are legit.

There is some contradicting information about the blend online. Different websites mention different wrappers, different binders, and different fillers. Our information tells us the wrapper is Habano from Ecuador. The binder is a decade old Piloto Cubana from the Dominican Republic. The tobaccos inside the cigar come from Nicaragua, The United States, and Brazil. But we would like to put a disclaimer here. Due to all the contradicting information, we can’t be 100% sure that we have the blend correct. The size of this robusto is 5×52

The cigar is quite good looking. A thick, oily, and dark wrapper. With two shiny rings, a smaller golden ring with Signature in a classic font. The top ring is black with gold. The black has a carbon fiber print and the Bugatti name and logo. The construction feels good. The shape of the cigar is good, the head is nicely rounded. The cigar has strong charcoal, barbecue aroma. Charred wood, aromas like that.

The cold draw is fine. Spicy, with some sweetness. Once lit, the cigar has a strong coffee flavor, with spice and pepper. The barbecue taste that is in the aroma is also in the flavor. Hickory, brown spices, herbs, pepper. Combined with leather and coffee. The mouthfeel is thick. Slowly the cigar gets a little salty, with hay, brown spices, toast, earthiness, leather, and that hickory barbecue wood. At the end of the first third, some nuttiness shows up. The wood and barbecue flavor fades away. Halfway the nut flavor becomes strong, with pepper, and a little leather.

The draw is good. The ash is salt and pepper colored, but with more pepper than salt. The burn is straight, but the wrapper is so thick and leathery that it takes some effort to keep it burning. This cigar is bold, not nuanced. In your face flavors, quite strong. Medium to medium-full bodied. The perfect cigar for after a heavy meal or during a backyard barbecue party. The smoke is good, thick enough, and good enough in volume. The cigar gains strength too, starting out medium going to full. The smoke time is three hours

Would I buy this cigar again? Yes

Categories: 90, Bugatti, Dominican cigars, PDR Cigars | Tags: , , , ,

San Jeronimo Habano Natural Robusto

San Jeronimo Habano Natural Robusto. A cigar distributed by Kafie Cigars, yet it’s not produced at Tabacalera Kafie y Cia. San Jerónimo is the oldest brand in existence in Honduras. It gets its name from a tobacco-producing region. According to the owner, Oscar Orlando Ferrera, the brand is around since the 1940s.

The San Jeronimo Habano Natural Robusto is a classic Robusto. That means 5×50. The filler tobaccos are from Nicaragua and Honduras. The binder is Honduran while the wrapper comes from Ecuador. The other two blends of San Jeronimo are a Connecticut and a Maduro. The artwork on all three cigars is the same, except for a different color foot ring.

The cigar feels a bit light. But that should not be an issue. The wrapper is decent, with some sparkles of minerals. It’s slightly oily and has a few veins. It’s Colorado colored. The construction feels good. As for the ring, what goes for the San Jeronimo Maduro goes for the San Jeronimo Habano as well, as the rings are identical. The golden outlines are too thick and don’t fit with the picture of the tobacco fields. The color scheme is off. And the picture is too detailed to be printed on a small ring to look good. The aroma is strong, very strong, and surprising. It’s all milk chocolate.

The milk chocolate is mildly present in the cold draw, but spicy straw is more prominent. The cold draw gives a good air resistance though. But once the cigar is lit, the milk chocolate is clearly noticeable again. There are a slight acidity and dry yet soft young wood. Then all of a sudden there is a toffee flavor, extremely unusual but quite nice. There is also a little spice. The sweetness is getting stronger and slightly creamy. Halfway the cigar is sweet, yet tangy. Like a sweet and sour Asian dish, but without the carbs from the rice. The balance is there, with a little spice. In the final third, the cigar has wood, leather, earthiness but with plenty of sweetness as well. A little rough around the edges, but that adds character. There are also dark spices in the flavor profile

The draw is great. The pepper and salt colored ash isn’t very firm. But the burn is great, and so is the smoke. This cigar has balance, it’s quite smooth but there is also a rough edge that gives it character. It is medium in body and flavor. The smoke time is two hours and thirty minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? Yes

Categories: 90, Honduran cigars, San Jeronimo, Tabacalera Kafie y Cia | Tags: , , , ,

La Sagrada Familia Sun Grown Toro

La Sagrada Familia Sun Grown Toro. Early 2017, Dutch entrepreneur and cigar aficionado Tom Mulder launched his La Sagrada Familia brand. As a passionate cigar enthusiast, Mulder thought about starting a brand. With help from his long-time friend Sasja van Horssen, he got in touch with Joya de Nicaragua. After a trip to Nicaragua and smoking several test blends, La Sagrada Familia was born.

The first blend is a cigar with Nicaraguan filler and binder. The wrapper is Habano from Ecuador. The cigars are popular in Tom’s home country The Netherlands. But when he left a few cigars at a cigar bar in Malaysia during a vacation, Malaysian cigar connoisseurs begged a distributor to carry the brand as well. And now the cigars are also available in Germany. Mulder isn’t looking for quick expansion but is adding more countries slowly.

The cigar looks good. A nice oily Colorado colored wrapper, without any thick veins. A simple ring, yet recognizable and clean in design. White, blue, and silver-gray. The cigar feels good. No detectable plugs of soft spots. The aroma is strong, deep, and intense. Spices, earthy, yet with some sweetness.

The cold draw is perfect. It leaves a spicy, mildly peppery, raising flavor on the palate. The cigar is mild earthy, mildly spicy but the main flavor is a creamy latte. The mouthfeel turns dry. As far as flavors go, some sawdust, caramel, spice, and leather show up. A little vinegar binds the flavors together. The coffee flavor remains, with some leather and hay. Then nutmeg and chocolate show up. At the end of the first third, the cigar has cedar, leather, coffee, pepper, and spices. The coffee remains in the second third, but now with a stronger acidity. The acidity mellows out, leaving more coffee, spice, and a little pepper to shine. The final third has more character. More wood, more leather, little earthiness. Some sweetness in the retrohale. There is a nice dose of pepper as well. All flavors are getting stronger.

The draw is flawless. The white ash is firm. The smoke is thick, white, and full. The burn is razor-sharp. It’s a medium-bodied, medium-full-flavored cigar growing to medium-full in strength. Well balanced and smooth. But the cigar loses character after a year of aging, so we suggest to smoke them when they are on the younger side. The last third had that character that was lacking in the first part. The smoke time is three hours and forty minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? Yes I will

Categories: 92, Fabrica de Tabacos Joya de Nicaragua, La Sagrada Familia, Nicaraguan cigars | Tags: , , , , ,

Don Chico Ecuador Toro

Don Chico Ecuador Toro. Or Don Chico Habano Toro as the cigar is called on the American market. But due to copyright legislation, non-Cuban cigar companies are not allowed to use Habano in their name outside the USA. Where most brands change Habano in Sun Grown, Barreda chose to replace it with Ecuador for their Don Chico line. The Don Chico line is a tribute to the 1st generation Barreda in the tobacco industry, Francisco Barreda. And the 3rd generation named this line in his honor. The line is also available in a Maduro version.


Ecuador on the secondary ring comes from the country where the Habano wrapper is grown, Ecuador. The binder comes from the South East Asian country of Indonesia. The filler comes from Nicaragua. The Barreda factory is located in Esteli and was founded in 2013. This 6×52 Toro is one of the three sizes available. The others are a 5×50 Robusto and a 6×60 Chairman. Stephanie Huete, sales & marketing manager for Barreda cigars, gave us a sample at the Intertabac trade show.

The cigar looks good. A Colorado to Colorado Maduro colored wrapper, smooth and oily. With a cloth foot ring, and two rings. The top ring is beige with brown and shows a drawing of Don Chico. The secondary ring just says Ecuador. The ring colors match the foot ring, and even though they look simple, it actually works for this cigar. That’s because the colors are well chosen. The shape of the cigar is flawless. And the aroma is strong. Barnyard with a strong cocoa powder smell. The cigar feels well constructed.


The cold draw is a bit tight. It’s sweet, cane sugar and sultanas. After lighting, the cigar gives coffee, leather, hay, and a pinch of salt. The mouthfeel is thick, like butter. The cigar gets more sweetness, more leather. The total lack of pepper is surprising in the first inch, but then it shows up, smooth yet pronounced. The cigar turns to cedar with sweetness. To balance it out, there’s a nice citrus acidity. The cigar gets more wood and leather. In the final third, the cigar gets peppery.


The draw is a bit tight, it feels like the smoke is a bit greasy. The burn is nice and straight tough. And the ash is very light, almost white. The smoke is decent, in thickness and volume. The cigar is medium-full bodied, medium-full flavored. The smoke time is three hours and twenty minutes.

Would I buy these cigars again? Occasionally

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Categories: 91, Don Chico, Nicaraguan cigars | Tags: , , , ,

Rocky Patel LB1 Robusto

Rocky Patel LB1 Robusto. Rocky Patel makes cigars in Honduras and Nicaragua. And even though he started out in Honduras, last few years he focussed on Nicaragua for production. Almost all of the new blends came out of his Tavicusa factory in Esteli. That factory is owned by Rocky Patel and his partner Amilcar Perez. The Honduran production is made at El Paraiso, a factory owned by Plasencia. But Patel has a special relationship, which allows them to use his own methods, his own people and his own standards for his brands. It’s sort of a lease deal.


This Rocky Patel LB1 is made at that El Paraiso factory. And it’s one of the two new blends that were recently released, made in Honduras. It’s quite normal for cigars to have a factory code during the blending process, and for the LB1 Patel decided to keep that factory code as the name. The cigar is made with tobacco from Honduras and Nicaragua in the filler. The binder is also Nicaraguan. The Nicaraguan tobaccos come from Patel’s farm in Esteli. The wrapper is a Habano wrapper from Ecuador.

The cigar is a looker. A very dark yet smooth wrapper. But the foot has been cut by a drunken torcedor. When placed on a table, foot down, it leans like the Tower of Pisa. The wrapper is evenly in color and smooth. The white and copper-colored ring contrasts the darkness well. The ring is quite simple, yet a little too overwhelming. There’s too many lines, stars, shapes so it makes the ring distracting. The barnyard and manure aroma is quite strong.


The cold draw is a bit though. The flavors are leather and pepper, spicy. But it feels a bit like wet leather, making the draw a bit draggy. Once lit, its pepper and cinnamon toast with espresso. The flavors then evolve to a mixture of soil, leather, coffee, sweetness, and a hint of citrus. The cigar is mellow, and the flavors settle for cinnamon toast with a little pepper, sweetness, and grass. Halfway some wood, more soil, and leather show up, but still with the spiced toast and sweetness.


The draw is good. Better than the cold draw. The white smoke is thick and plentiful. The salt and pepper colored ash is quite firm. The cigar is mellow and well balanced. Where the darkness of the wrapper would suggest it’s a strong, full-bodied cigar, it’s actually not. It’s a medium-bodied, medium flavored, balanced and smooth cigar. The smoke time is two hours and thirty minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? Yeah, I think so.

number91

Categories: 91, El Paraiso, Honduran cigars, Rocky Patel | Tags: , , , , ,

Jas Sum Kral Nuggs Habano

Jas Sum Kral Nuggs Habano. In the last few years, more and more scientific research is showing the positive effects of Cannabidiol. That is one of the two main components of marijuanaIt is the second most prevalent of the active ingredients of cannabis, but not the one that gets you high. That’s the THC. But it is the part of the marijuana plant that has the medicinal benefits, and scientific studies are proving that. Since it’s getting legal in more and more states in the United States, and countries worldwide, it was a matter of time before cigar manufacturers started to experiment. But spraying cigars with CBD oil is ineffective and resulted in unsmokeble cigars. That’s when Jas Sum Kral owner Riste Riatevski hired a laboratory and a chemist to completely re-engineer the process. With success, as they managed to break it down and infuse cigars without altering the flavor, yet remain the positive effects of CBD. And it’s patented, so Jas Sum Kral is the only company that can make cigars this way.

Jas Sum Kral released the Jas Sum Kral Nuggs. That is a cigar with its unique CBD infusion technique. So unique that even the needles that distribute the CBD in the cigar had to be designed by the company and those are patented too. According to Jas Sum Kral, the CBD can’t be detected by any modern equipment nor by sniffing dogs. And every single batch is tested by a third-party laboratory. The blend is not disclosed officially, but is the same as for the Nuggs Maduro, except for the wrapper. That means an Indonesian binder and Nicaraguan fillers. It’s only available in a 5×48 Robusto for now.

The first noticeable thing is the cellophane. It’s cut and that is done so all the cigars can be injected with the CDB. Jas Sum Kral created special trays, all cigars arrive at the laboratory in a vertical position so they can be injected with the CDB solution without human handling. That saves time and cost. The aqua green ring has the golden Jas Sum Kral logo but the print quality could be better. It’s such a detailed ring, it deserves a better quality finish. The Ecuadorian Habano wrapper has a few veins. The closed foot, something Jas Sum Kral is known for, is absent. But that is a result of the CDB injection, closed feet weren’t possible. The cigar feels good, well filled. The aroma is strong, hay and barnyard.

 

Because I was traveling light, I could not bring a cutter. I used my fingernail to cut the cigar. The cold draw is perfect with a mild sweet hay taste. The cigar has a dry taste, leather, soil, and almonds. The cigar gets a little sweet with grass and hay as well. After a centimeter, there is a slight bitterness, medicinal like. The marzipan like sweetness gets a little stronger. There’s soil, leather, wood, and sweetness. After a third, pepper shows up too. The bitterness gets stronger, to a level that it’s slightly unpleasant. The bitterness comes and goes. There’s also some gingerbread flavor. In the final third, the bitterness is gone

 

The draw is fantastic. The ash is white, dense and firm. The smoke is good, nice and thick. The cigar is medium in body and flavor. The smoke time is an hour and forty-five minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? If it was better priced.

number90

Categories: 90, Jas Sum Kral, Nicaraguan cigars, Tabacalera Aragon | Tags: , , , ,

Jas Sum Kral Toothpick 2.0 Habano

A few days ago, we smoked and reviewed the Jas Sum Kral Toothpick 2.0 Maduro. This is a medium filler from Tabacalera Aragon and Jas Sum Kral. It uses small pieces of tobacco in combination with long leaves, creating a medium filler. Or Cuban sandwich as it is called as well. The cigar comes in one size only, a 5×50 robusto. But in two blends, that Maduro version and a Habano version.

This is a review of the Habano Toothpick 2.0.

The blend for both cigars is exactly the same. But the wrapper is not. This Habano version has a Habano wrapper from Ecuador. And these two cigars are exactly the cigars to give to somebody who claims that cigar wrappers are only aesthetic and don’t do anything for the flavor. Because they do, and when they smoke these two cigars, they will know


The wrapper isn’t even in color. It has a gradually changing color from dark to lighter, which is clearly seen around the edging where the wrapper overlaps. It looks like a thin wrapper, with clear, fine veins. The cigar feels good, looks good and this time, the white part of the ring is on top. That and the lighter shade of wrapper indicates that this is the Habano version. The cigar has a leathery smell, like a horse saddle. That combined with hay and wood.

The cold draw is a bit tight and spicy. I taste pepper on my lips. After lighting, I taste leather, wood, soil with pepper and sweetness. Soon the sweetness turns to sugar, with wood and pepper. After a third, I taste hazelnuts and chocolate, almost Nutella like. With pepper. Very nice and flavorful. The cigar than evolves to more pepper, less chocolate. Some wood is noticeable too, with leather.

The draw is a bit on the tight side. The smoke is a little thin because of that. The burn is great though, as well as the ash. The cigar is medium bodied, medium-full flavored. There is a nice evolution in the cigar. The smoke time is one hour and fifty minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? I have a box of 50, so, for the time being, I have enough stock.

number91

Categories: 92, Jas Sum Kral, Nicaraguan cigars, Tabacalera Aragon | Tags: , , , ,

Debonaire Habano Robusto

I had heard about Debonaire, yet I had never smoked one. I had smoked Indian Motorcycle cigars though, which are also owned by Phil Zanghi and made at the De Los Reyes factory. And that factory is growing on me with Puros de Hostos, Saga, and Indian Motorcycle, so I had high expectations from this Debonaire Habano.

 


The cigar was recommended to me by several people, people whose opinion matter to me in the cigar industry. People like Mariska from Tabakado for example, who had been trying to get Debonaire distributed in The Netherlands for a while, calling all distributors before one finally decided to pick up the brand and making both Indian Motorcycles and Debonaire available on the Dutch market.

 


The cigar has a nice Colorado colored wrapper that looks a bit rough on the cap though. The ring is big, gold and brown, with white letters. The print quality is high and it gives the cigar a luxurious look. The aroma, barnyard, and swamp, isn’t too strong. Construction wise, the cigar feels a bit hard.

 


The cold draw is a bit on the tight side, yet acceptable, quite spicy with raw tobacco and pepper. After lighting, I taste toast and leather, with a hint of cinnamon. After a few puffs, I taste wood, leather, and grass. After a centimeter, I taste a grassy and woody metallic flavor with a creamy mouthfeel. After a third, I taste a grassy and hay with nutmeg mixture. Halfway I taste toast with cinnamon again. Then the cigar turns to cedar, spice and red chili pepper. The final third its all about pepper and cinnamon, on full blast. Near the end, I also taste hazelnuts.

 


The draw is great. The ash is white and firm, yet the burn I had to correct. The smoke is good. The flavors, medium strength, are mellow and very suitable for Cuban cigar aficionados. The strength is medium too. The smoke time is two hours twenty minutes

.

Would I buy this cigar again? No, I won’t. It’s a good cigar, just not for me. I would, however, suggest people to give it a try unless you are into strong, full-flavored, bold, cigars.

number89

Categories: 89, De Los Reyes, Debonaire, Dominican cigars | Tags: , , , ,

Mbombay Habano Robusto

A Dutch friend of mine was raving about Mbombay for a while, a brand that back then, and we’re talking about 4 years ago, never ever heard of. He gave me two to try, I smoked one, which I liked, and kept the other to write a review. But since I have so many cigars, the review had to wait for a while.


The cigars are made in Costa Rica with a blend of Honduran, Nicaraguan and Dominican filler, a Dominican binder and a Ecuadorian Habano wrapper. The owner of the brand is a shop owner in Palm Springs, California, Mel Shah, who decided to open a cigar shop after his career in IT. Now he is a brand owner too, with distribution all over the USA.


The wrapper looks amazing, dark, smooth and oily as far as I can see. And that’s not far because the cigar has a ring that covers most of the cigars. It is a very detailed ring with all Indian symbols and figures I guess. The construction feels good and I love the closed foot. The cigar has a mild manure aroma.


After I cut the cigar I notice a tight cold draw but then I remember the closed foot. I taste raw tobacco with a mild minty flavor. After lighting I taste white ground pepper and soil. Medium in strength. After a few puffs I taste some sweetness with the white pepper and cedar, clean clear cedar. The pepper disappears quickly. After a third I taste more agave syrup like sweetness. Halfway it’s cedar with sweetness and just a little spice. At the end I taste a little nuts too.


The smoke is white and quite thick. The draw is great after the foot opens. The white ash is firm. The burn needed some help, but I blame the ventilator in the back of the room for that. The evolution is subtle, the cigar is medium bodied, medium plus flavored. The smoke time is an hour and a half.

Would I buy this cigar again? Yes

Score: 91
number91

Categories: 91, Costa Rican cigars, Mbombay, Tabaccos de Costa Rica | Tags: , , ,

Cigar of the month February

I decided to make February Fernandez month, all cigars I reviewed for this month are made at the A.J. Fernandez factory in Esteli, Nicaragua, a factory I have visited in 2015 and a factory that produces some of my favourite cigars.

The cigar with the highest rating last month are two cigars with the exact same score:

San Lotano Pigskin & Man’o’war Skull Crusher with a 94 score

Now as for the complete list of cigars I published:

1) San Lotano Pigskin (Nicaragua) 94 points
1) Man’o’war Skull Crusher (Nicaragua) 94 points
3) Ave Maria Divinia (Nicaragua) 93 points
4) Ave Maria Reconquista  (Nicaragua) 92 points
5) San Lotano Maduro Lancero (Nicaragua) 92 points
6) San Lotano Habano Lancero (Nicaragua) 92 points
6) Man’o’war little devil (Nicaragua) 92 points
8) San Lotano Maduro Robusto (Nicaragua) 92 points
8) San Lotano The Bull Robusto (Nicaragua) 92 points
10) Man’o’War 52C (Nicaragua) 92 points
11) Man’o’War Ruination Torpedo (Nicaragua) 91 points
12) Reposado Habano Salomon (Nicaragua) 91 points
13) La Herencia Cubana Perfecto (Nicaragua) 91 points
14) Reposado Maduro Salomon (Nicaragua) 90 points
15) Man’o’war Phalanx (Nicaragua) 90 points
16) La Herencia Cubana Fuerte Robusto (Nicaragua) 90 points
17) Ave Maria Churchill (Nicaragua) 90 points
18) Man’o’war Torpedo (Nicaragua) 90 points
19) Man’o’war Virtue Torpedo (Nicaragua) 89 points
20) Puro Autentico Maduro (Nicaragua) 89 points
21) Puro Autentico Ligero (Nicaragua) 89 points

 

Categories: Cigar of the month | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

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