Posts Tagged With: perfecto

Liga Privada #T52 Flying Pig

Liga Privada #T52 Flying Pig. The fifth and last cigar from the Liga Privada Year of the Rat sampler for the Chinese zodiac Year of the Rat. I reviewed a lot of Year of the Rat cigars, but not this sampler. The complete sampler went up in smoke. The Liga Privada Nasty Fritas went up in smoke earlier, just as the Ratzilla, the Velvet Rat, and the #9 Flying Pig.

After the success of the Liga Privada #9 Flying Pig, Drew Estate decided to release the Liga Privada T52 Flying Pig a year later. The name comes from Jonathan Drew. When he went to Nicaragua to make cigars, people said “he will be successful when pig fly”. So when Drew Estate was successful, JD named a cigar after the disbelievers. The wrapper comes from Connecticut. It’s a Sun Grown Habano that’s been stalk cut. It means that the whole plant is cut and dried, instead of individual leaves. Brazilian Mata Fina makes the binder. The filler is from Honduras and Nicaragua.

As with the Liga Privada #9 Flying Pig, or for that matter any flying pig in the Undercrown line as well, the cool shape gives the cigar bonus points for looks. Drew Estate makes two Flying Pigs and one Feral Flying Pig for the Liga Privada series. Undercrown has three, Sungrown, Shade, and Maduro. The wrapper is even darker and oilier than the #9, with the same leathery, toothy look. The ring is the same design but the gray is brown and the silver logo is copper now. The cigar feels hard but evenly hard. The aroma is slightly dusty with hay, almost like an empty hay shed after the winter.

The cold draw is fine. Once lit the cigar gives coffee, earthiness, dark chocolate, and leather. Dark flavors. The cigar remains earthy and dark, with a hint of dark chocolate. But some spice and sweetness come in as well. The mouthfeel is warm and pleasant. Comforting almost. The retrohale gives notes of roasted nuts. After a third, there is a slight acidity with the earthiness and coffee. There’s also some pepper, but mellow and in the background. The flavors are complex. There is a slight bitterness that hints at dark chocolate or durian without the dark chocolate or durian flavor. Dark spices and pepper are lingering around the corner. Coffee isn’t far gone either. The mouthfeel is turning creamy. The sweetness gains strength, but smokey with an almost meaty mouthfeel. The smoke feels thick, almost textured. With nice barbecue spices. Near the end, the cigar gets more pepper but with a minty aftertaste.

It’s hard to keep the cigar lit in the beginning. But that gets better after half an inch. But once the cigar is burning, it is on. The smoke fills the office and the extraction fan works overtime. The draw is great. The ash is dense and firm. This is an interesting cigar with complex aromas. It is full-bodied and full of flavor. The smoke time is three hours.

Would I smoke this cigar again? I prefer a slightly thinner ring gauge.

Categories: 92, Gran Fabrica Drew Estate, Liga Privada, Nicaraguan cigars | Tags: , , , , ,

Muestra de Tabac Trifecta Double Claro Habano

Muestra de Tabac Trifecta Double Claro Habano. The third and final blend of the Muestra de Tabac Trifecta series. A big and thick perfecto with a dual wrapper. Not barberpole style but one wrapper on the bottom half, and one on the top half. Since both sides are cut, it is up to the smoker to decide what side to light. That makes this concept stand out from other dual wrapper cigars. Last year, I did reviews of the Muestra de Tabac green and black.

Patrick Potter is the blender of this cigar, but Joey Febre and Patrick Potter came up with the concept. The cigars come from the small factory Tabacalera La Perla in Esteli, Nicaragua. The patent of this concept is pending. The name is confusing though considering the popular Muestra de Saka cigars from Dunbarton Tobacco. Too close to comfort in our opinion. But that’s something for Tabac Trading Company to decide on.

The concept is great, but it forces the smoker to choose. What side to light, and what side to puff on. The Habano side is a little longer than the Candela side, so let’s light the Candela side. The ring is mirrored so it looks right whatever side you decide to light. The Habano wrapper is oily and leathery. The Double Claro side looks a bit dry and more delicate. The construction feels good. The cigar has a strong aroma of barnyard and hay.

The cold draw is great. There is a funny milk chocolate flavor in the cold draw, with spices. If you flip the cigar and cold draw the Double Claro side, the cigar has more of a dry hay flavor. Once lit, the flavors are dry. Dry wood, dry leaves, and dry leather. The dry mouthfeel continues, while the flavors change to licorice and cloves. The Candela leaf gives a bit of a grassy flavor, but the flavors are quite mild. There’s also a little acidity. Halfway, when the wrapper is almost changing, things pick up. There is a little more sweetness, some more cloves, some pepper. The grassy flavor is gone. The cigar is getting a little stronger. Once the Habano wrapper is reached. The cigar gets pepper and sweetness. But also a distinct flavor that is best described as dry autumn leaves. Leather returns, with a nice dose of underlying pepper. There’s also a little nuttiness that grows towards the end.

The draw is great. The light gray ash is quite firm. The smoke is good. The first part of the cigar, with the Candela wrapper, is mild. It’s not really captivating. The burn is decent and needed a touch-up once or twice. The second half of the cigar packs more flavor and strength. The difference in the wrapper is clearly noticeable. The smoke time is three hours and thirty minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? No, I don’t think so

Categories: 90, Muestra de Tabac, Nicaraguan cigars, Tabacalera La Perla | Tags: , , , , ,

JFR Lunatic Loco Maduro El Loquito

JFR Lunatic Loco Maduro El Loquito. This is the latest addition to the JFR brand. The brand exists since 2005 when Aganorsa Leaf released the line for brick & mortar stores. JFR stands for Just For Retailers. In 2014, a new JFR line emerged, the JFR Lunatic. And last year, Aragorsa expanded the JFR brand with the Lunatic Loco. In different blends, including Habano and Maduro. And all three sizes are perfectos. El Loquito measures 4¾x60, El Loco is 4¾x70. El Gran Loco is a crazy 5½x80 Perfecto.

The JFR Lunatic Loco Maduro is made with tobaccos from Aganorsa Leaf as the filler and the binder. Aganorsa grows tobacco in Nicaragua. The wrapper is Maduro from San Andres in Mexico. The El Loquito is the smallest of the three cigars and the size is similar to Drew Estate Flying Pigs. The El Loquito even includes a pigtail.

The cigar looks good. An evenly dark Maduro wrapper. It is not very oily but the color of the wrapper works with the ring. The ring is dark blue, almost black, with silver details. And that silver really pops, making the design stand out. The construction feels good. A pigtail is always a plus when it comes to aesthetics. The aroma is very mild, wood, and manure.

The cold draw is fantastic. It has a strong raisin aroma with some white pepper. After lighting the cigar has a thick creamy dark chocolate flavor with some earthiness and a hint of leather. The leather slowly gets the center stage, but the dark chocolate isn’t far behind. The creaminess disappears and the mouthfeel turns dry. In the first third, the flavors remain leather, wood, dark chocolate but then some black pepper and nutty flavors show up. There is also some sweetness. Halfway the dark chocolate disappears and makes place for hay. But the oak, earthiness, and leather are the dominant flavors. In the final third, the dark chocolate returns as a supporting flavor.

The draw is great. The smoke could be a bit thicker, which would score higher. The burn is slow and straight. The salt and pepper colored ash is quite firm. This is a full-bodied cigar. The flavors are medium-full as well. Balanced, yet due to the thick ring gauge, the cigar isn’t dynamic. The smoke time is four hours and fifteen minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? Yes, I might.

Categories: 90, Casa Fernandez, Nicaraguan cigars, TABSA | Tags: , , , , , ,

Muestra de Tabac Trifecta Brazilian Mata Fina & Sumatra

Muestra de Tabac Trifecta Brazilian Mata Fina & Sumatra. That is a long name for a very unique cigar. So unique that Tabac Trading Company has a patent-pending. The owner of Tabac Trading is Patrick Potter, who grew up in a tobacco store. His grandfather owned the original Tinder Box. Five years ago, in 2015, Potter decided to start a cigar company and traveled over Latin America to learn from experienced blenders. He has seen farms in every country, learned all about fermentation, characteristics of the tobacco and how to blend them together. And with his creativity, he developed the Trifecta line.


There are three different blends in the Trifecta series. For this review, we decided to go for the Brazilian Mata Fina & Sumatra. That’s the one with the green label. This perfecto can be smoked from both sides. The ring is mirrored, so it looks right from whatever side you smoke it. One side has a Sumatra wrapper, the other side has a Mata Fina wrapper. The binder is viso from Cameroon. The fillers all come from Nicaragua, where this cigar is produced.


The cigar looks odd. The shape, the ring that can be read upside down and the two-tone wrapper. The biggest part of the cigar has a darker colored wrapper, rough so that must be the Mata Fina. The other side has a smoother oily wrapper, which is the Sumatra. It would have looked nicer if the ring was exactly in the middle, and both wrappers would have an equal part of the cigar. But the idea is very cool. There is no cap, both sides are open. The cigar feels well constructed, although both ends feel a little soft. There is a strong barnyard aroma to this cigar. The ring is golden with the Tabac Trading Co logo on it and then two green stripes on the side. The stripes have the word Trifecta on it, mirrored. The design could be a little better, less plain, more exciting.


The cold draw is good. The cigar has a bit of dark chocolate, but also a sourness in the flavor profile before being lit. The call was made to light the Sumatra part of the wrapper. The cigar tastes like coffee, sugar, dried leaves and herbs. The sweetness is like powdered sugar. The leaves are slowly growing in strength just as the green herbs. A little musky, nutty flavor shows up too, with a buttery, thick mouthfeel. The nut flavor becomes more pronounced over the spicy herbs from the Cameroon binder. There is a good dose of pepper in the flavor profile too. Right before the change of the wrapper, the cigar gets a nice chocolate flavor, with nuts, spices, leather, and pepper. The mouthfeel is creamy again. As expected the cigar gets sweeter once the Brazilian Mata Fina wrapper starts burning. The cigar remains to be balanced, but the balance isn’t as good as with the Sumatra wrapper. The pepper is getting stronger with the sweetness. The nuttiness returns, but not as strong as before. Pepper is overpowering all other flavors.


The draw is fine. The smoke is thick and plenty in volume, above average. The light-colored ash is firm. The burn needed to be corrected a few times. The cigar is medium-full bodied, medium-full flavored as well. The smoke time is two and a half hours.

Would I buy this cigar again? Yes

number89

Categories: 89, Muestra de Tabac, Nicaraguan cigars | Tags: , , , ,

Muestra de Saka Chubby Unicorn

Muestra de Saka Chubby Unicorn. Now, this is a true unicorn. Steve Saka created the Muestra de Saka Unicorn as a joke, to see if it was possible to sell a $100 cigar. But he did it with the best tobaccos he could find, not messing around with his integrity and reputation. Much to his surprise, they sold like hotcakes. He only makes 1000 Muestra de Saka Unicorns a year and last September he told me that he has backorders for at least 7000 Unicorns. And then he gave a Muestra de Saka Chubby Unicorn.


The Chubby Unicorn is a tweaked version of the Muestra de Saka Unicorn. Saka felt it could be a bit better with an extra leaf, so he made the Chubby Unicorn. Yet he has no intention to produce them for a commercial release. It is too much of a hassle, it takes up more time, energy and effort than it’s worth. The Chubby Unicorn is even more of a unicorn than the annual release. During our conversation, which took place at the launch of the Sin Compromiso El Amsterdammer, Saka did not comment on the blend. Neither did he go into specifics of the cigar.


The cigar looks great. The shape is beautiful. The wrapper is dark and oily. The veins are thin yet clear, but it fits the color and the shine. The ring looks handwritten. The cigar feels well constructed. We suspect that the same pair of rollers responsible for the Muestra de Saka Unicorn is responsible for the Chubby Unicorn as well. The aroma is woody.


The cold draw is amazing, even though only the cap was cut. The small opening gives an amazing draw though. The flavors are thick and nutty. The start is very leathery but with sweetness and cloves. Leather, soil, coffee, and spices held together by some sweetness if that comes after the initial puffs. Soon to be joined by some pepper and wood. Slowly the cigar evolves to more nutty flavors, as in the cold draw. But with wood, leather, spices, and pepper. The mouthfeel is thick and creamy. Some dark chocolate shows up as well. The leather makes a comeback right before the end of the first third. The second third is mostly nuts, with some soil, pepper, and wood. In the final third, the nut flavors are gone. It’s wood, leather, and pepper galore in the end.


The draw is phenomenal. The cigar produces a thick, full smoke in copious amounts. The burn is a little uneven though and had to be corrected. The salt and pepper colored ash is firm. The cigar is both full-bodied and full-flavored. It is well balanced though with a lot of character. The smoke time is three hours.

Would I smoke this cigar again? I wish

number93

Categories: 93, Fabrica de Tabacos Joya de Nicaragua, Nicaraguan cigars | Tags: , , , ,

Balmoral Serie Signaturas Paso Doble Brindis

Balmoral Serie Signaturas Paso Doble Brindis. That is a long name. But a beautiful idea. Collaborations have been going on for the longest time in the cigar industry. But in the last few years, more and more occur. Balmoral joined the collaboration train in 2018 when they launched the Balmoral Serie Signaturas. Their maiden release was a collaboration with Ernesto Perez Carrillo, called the Dueto. Ministry of Cigars reviewed that cigar. And for the second annual release, Royal Agio teamed up with La Flor Dominicana. Boris Wintermans from Agio and Litto Gomez from La Flor Dominicana had known each other for years and joined forces for the Balmoral Serie Signaturas Paso Doble. A three size limited edition release. We are reviewing the Perfecto, which is called the Brindis. Brindis means toast, so cheers.


The Paso Doble is named after a military march. Its speed allowed troops to give 120 steps per minute. This march gave rise to a traditional Spanish dance, a musical genre including both voice and instruments, and a genre of instrumental music often played during bullfighting. The cigar is made from Dominican fillers, and the binder is also Dominican. The tobacco comes from the farm of La Flor Dominicana. The wrapper is a dark Ecuadorian Habano. We are reviewing the Perfecto, which is called the Brindis. Brindis means toast, so cheers.


The cigar looks amazing. The shape is eye-catching. And the little knot on top of the cigar is a beautiful finishing touch. The rings are huge. Deep blue, popping gold and the Balmoral Añejo gray with white. The design and print quality is top-notch. The details are amazing, up to the signatures of Boris Wintermans and Litto Gomez. The dark wrapper looks oily and leathery, evenly colored as well. The cigar feels well constructed. The aroma is strong, it reminds us of hay, straw, farmland, and wood.


The cold draw is great, with flavors of salty potato chips and pepper. After lighting, it’s a sweet espresso with pepper. Some leather is involved as well with a little bit of chocolate. The flavors evolve to soil, coffee, leather, spices, and pepper. Slowly it continues to change, subtle, with a little cream, a little vanilla, more dark chocolate. The pepper is there, but it’s mellow. The flavors fluctuate in strength, sometimes the pepper is dominant, then it’s the coffee and chocolate, then the earthiness. There isn’t much evolution, yet it’s never boring. In the last third, there’s a little salt as well.


The draw is perfect. The ash is quite dark, yet firm. The burn needed a few touch-ups. The smoke is fine. The flavors are balanced, smooth yet full. Just like the strength, that’s full too. The smoke time is three and a half hours.

Would I buy this cigar again? I wish
number93

Categories: 93, Balmoral, Dominican cigars, Tabacalera La Flor | Tags: , , , , ,

Liga Privada Unico Feral Flying Pig

Liga Privada Unico Feral Flying Pig. Ever since the launch of the Flying Pig series, the cigars have been extremely popular. So popular that they became a regular production cigar. It started with the Liga Privada #9 Flying Pig, then the Liga Privada T52 Flying pig and in 2012, Drew Estate released a bigger version. That’s the Liga Privada Unico Feral Flying Pig. A 5⅜x60 version of the Flying Pig with a blend of his own. That’s why it’s part of the Unico series. Unico cigars are Liga Privada blends, tweaks from the #9 and T52 blends but still belong to the Liga Privada family.


Nowadays, almost all Drew Estate blends come out with a flying pig. The three different Undercrowns have Flying Pigs. I reviewed the Undercrown Shade, Sun Grown and Maduro Flying Pigs. But there are Flying Pigs for the Kentucky Fire Cured series and Herrera Esteli blends as well. But there is only one Feral Flying Pig, all the others are much smaller than this Feral Flying Pig. There’s only one illusive Feral Flying Pig Basher, which is a regular Feral Flying Pig with a different ring. That one was released for the wedding of Marvin Samel, one of the Drew Estate founders.

The cigar looks great. The shape is amazing and the pigtail finishes the cigar in style. A thick, oily, toothy, Colorado Maduro colored wrapper with a simple yet clear ring. Just a simple white with light gray backdrop for a dark gray FERAL print. Simple, effective, stylish. On the back of the ring, the Liga Privada logo is printed. There are also a few veins on the backside of the cigar. The cigar feels well constructed. The aroma is medium in strength. Dark wood, sawdust, and some dark chocolate aromas are coming from the cigar.

The cold draw is great. The flavors from the cold draw are raw tobacco and dark chocolate. At first, the mouthfeel is dry. The bitterness of coffee and soil, with some acidity. The coffee gets stronger while the mouthfeel gets a bit creamy. The Nicaraguan pepper shows up too. Once the burn passes the thinner part of the foot, other flavors start to emerge. The coffee and pepper remain, but there are hints of wood, leather, spices, and sweetness as well. After an inch, a metallic flavor shows up with leather and pepper. The flavors then evolve to oak, leather, tobacco, and coffee. And a slight hint of chocolate in the background. After a third, a mild sweet candy flavor is noticeable for a little while. A rare flavor that I never tasted in cigars before. It’s hard to pinpoint what it resembles, but puffy rice candy comes close. That flavor disappears soon though. Halfway it’s back to espresso, leather and some sweetness. The coffee, leather, and pepper remain the same until the end. The sweetness slowly turns into marzipan.

The draw is great. And the smoke is Drew Estate famous. Thick, full, copious amounts. The burn is pretty straight. The light gray ash is quite firm, yet a bit flaky. This is a full-flavored, full-bodied cigar. But balanced, so it’s not overpowering. The smoke time is four hours exactly

Would I buy this cigar again? Yes I will

number92

Categories: 92, Gran Fabrica Drew Estate, Liga Privada, Nicaraguan cigars | Tags: , , , , , ,

Patoro Serie P Jeroboam

Patoro Serie P Jeroboam. This is a Swiss cigar brand. But the cigars are Dominican made. They are made at De Los Reyes. Other brands that are made at that factory are Puros de Hostos, Indian Motorcycle, Debonaire, Saga and more. Ministry of Cigars reviewed the Saga Short Tales Tomo VI, Debonaire Habano, Debonaire Maduro, and the Indian Motorcycle Maduro from the same factory. And now the Patoro Serie P Jeroboam, which is a perfecto shaped cigar. The filler and binder are Dominican. The wrapper is Cameroon according to the Patoro website. But there are a few vitolas exclusively for the American market. And those are wrapped in a Brazilian Maduro wrapper.

When we bought this cigar, we didn’t know anything about it. It was recommended by a retailer in The Netherlands. He had got them in, we never smoked it, so we bought a few to review. Something unknown, odd shape, why not try it? With a price tag of 11 euro, it’s not a cheap cigar and it’s probably hard to find now. Patoro is no longer available on the Dutch market as the distributor stopped selling premium long fillers (again). And no other distributor has taken on the brand yet.

The shape looks cool. Because of the curve at the foot of the cigar, it looks a bit like the Opus X Chili Pepper. Yet not as curved as that cigar. The ring is simple, glossy orange with a P and a star. No further information. The oily wrapper has a few veins. The construction feels good. The aroma is good. A mixture of chocolate, pepper, and wood.

For the shape, the cold draw is surprisingly easy. And it tastes peppery yet sweet. Once lit, the flavors are coffee with sweetness and leather. Then some nice spices show up. All-spice, cinnamon, and gingerbread. All quite sweet but pleasantly sweet. The mouthfeel is dry. The flavors remain the same in the first half, but then wood shows up. Still with the spice and some pepper. The sweetness remains strong as well. Slowly there’s more leather and even a little vanilla.

The draw is great. The burn is beautiful. And the light-colored ash is firm. The smoke is nice white and plentiful. This is a medium-full bodied cigar. The flavors are also medium-full. And well rounded. The smoke time is two hours.

Would I buy this cigar again? 11 euro is a bit too high priced. If it was 8 euro I would not hesitate.

number90

Categories: 90, De Los Reyes, Dominican cigars, Patoro | Tags: , , , , ,

RoMa Craft Cromagnon Aquitaine Mode 5

RoMa Craft is Mike Rosales and Skip Martin. Where Martin was a retailer, Rosales had his own Costa Rica made brands. When Martin’s shop got destroyed by a Hurricane Ike, he started working with Rosales to mail order a house blend. That way, he could still serve his customers even though the shop was destroyed. The blends from Costa Rica didn’t work, so the duo teamed up with Esteban Disla in Nicaragua. The cigars became so popular, that the trio opened their own factory, Nica Sueno. Nica Dreams.

That first line was the Cromagnon, named after an early human. The Aquitaine is an offspring. It’s named after the region in France where remains of those early humans are found. The cigar uses Nicaraguan fillers from three regions. The binder is Cameroon. The wrapper is a Habano 2000 from Ecuador. The cigar comes in different sizes. RoMa Crafts international distributor Schuster Cigars sponsored us this 5×50 Perfecto. The name of this vitola is Mode 5.

The wrapper is oily, almost glossy. There are some thin veins. The color is quite dark. The cigar feels well rolled. The ring is actually a double ring. The bottom ring is white and then there’s a brown ring on top. The brown ring has Aquitaine embossed into it and the RoMa Craft logo on the back. The cigar has a strong aroma, quite woody.


The cold draw is perfect with a spicy, peppery flavor. Like strong cinnamon. The first draw after lighting give me coffee. Strong coffee with some pepper. The flavors quickly change to pepper, green herbs and some leather. It evolves with more leather, some wood, a little nutty flavor. And all bound together with a faint sweetness. Classic flavors, all clean and pronounced. The flavors are pretty consistent. There are nuanced differences, but all in the flavor profile mentioned above. There’s a little floral flavor as well. After a third, some chocolate shows up as well, quite bitter, dark chocolate. The final third has more of a nut flavor. Hazelnut and walnuts.

The draw is fantastic. The smoke is nice and thick. The color of the smoke is white. The light-colored ash is a bit flaky. The burn is quite straight. The cigar is medium-full bodied, medium flavored. Well balanced with clean flavors. The smoke time is one hour and fifty minutes

Would I buy this cigar again? I want a box

number91

Categories: 91, Nica Sueno, Nicaraguan cigars, RomaCraft | Tags: , , ,

Undercrown Flying Pig

This cigar was released in 2012, in The Netherlands. The name was Undercrown Flying Pig XRL. XLF stood for Extremely Rare Limited. Less than 200 boxes of 12 were released. And flew off the shelves like hotcakes. it was a release for Compaenen. Compaenen is a cooperation of independent tobacco shops in The Netherlands. They combine their buying power to negotiate exclusive releases for the participating shop. Pre-releases, private label cigars and limited editions such as the Undercrown Flying Pig XLR.

Two years later, Drew Estate released the Undercrown Flying Pig in the United States. And the cigar has been a hit there as well. And everywhere else where it’s been released. At first, it was a limited edition, now it’s a regular production cigar. The wrapper is a Mexican San Andres Maduro leaf. The binder is a stalk cut Habano from the Connecticut River Valley in the United States. The fillers come from Nicaragua and Brazil.

The cigar looks great. That shape, as we mentioned in the reviews of the Undercrown Shade Flying Pig and the Undercrown Sun Grown Flying Pig, is a favorite. And again, the color scheme of the ring fits the wrapper like a glove. The dark, matte, blue with the gold on that dark wrapper is a perfect match. The pigtail is a nice touch. The wrapper is leathery. The aroma is of dark chocolate and spices.

The cold draw is perfect. It has a flavor of raw tobacco. Once lit, it’s leather, chocolate, green herbs, and coffee. After a few puffs, leather and pepper are the main flavors. But on the background, there’s still faint dark chocolate as well. The flavors open up and become stronger. Pepper, wood, leather, chocolate, and hay. The flavors are spicy and full, with a mild buttery mouthfeel.

The draw is great and this is a classic Drew Estate smoke bomb. Thick, white, full smoke. Enough to get a response from the fire department. The burn isn’t perfect, but also not bad. The salt and pepper colored ash is firm. The cigar is full flavored and full bodied. The smoke time is two hours and ten minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? Yes

number92

Categories: 92, Gran Fabrica Drew Estate, Nicaraguan cigars, Undercrown | Tags: , , , ,

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