Posts Tagged With: robusto

Rocky Patel Number 6 Robusto

Rocky Patel Number 6 Robusto. One of the latest releases of Rocky Patel, released at the IPCPR trade show in July 2019. The number 6 is named after the test blend. Several test blends were made, and the 6th blend was picked. So that became the Rocky Patel Number 6. The cigar is available in several sizes, and for this review, we selected the 5½x50 Robusto.


Unlike most of the recent releases by Rocky Patel, this cigar is made in Honduras. For the last few years, most new cigars came from Patel’s factory in Nicaragua, Tavicusa. But this Number 6 is made at El Paraiso in Danli, Honduras. The blend consists of filler tobaccos from Nicaragua and Honduras. The binder is Honduran. And as a wrapper, Patel and his team picked a Honduran Corojo

The black and golden ring is huge. It covers half the cigar, and then there is another ring at the foot. But the matte black details, shiny gold and white letters work well together. The wrapper, as far as we can see, has a few thin veins. The color is great, and there is a light oily shine. The cigar feels well constructed. The medium-strong aroma is woody with some hay.


The cold draw is good, with a flavor of hay and allspice. The first puffs give coffee and dirt with pepper. There are spices as well. After that, it’s spicy and strong leather that tickles the back of the throat. Soon after the nuttiness from the Corojo wrapper shows up as well. To balance everything, there’s mild fruity citrus. The flavors change to nuts, leather, wood, hay, and sweetness. In the final third, the cigar has more wood, the sweetness and pepper are still there. The nut flavor is gone. The cigar starts to tingle in the back of the throat again.


The draw is great. The pepper and salt colored ash isn’t very firm though. The smoke is thick and plentiful and the burn is straight as an arrow. This is a medium-full bodied cigar, full-flavored. Well balanced, with character. But it’s not smooth. This is a cigar for a more experienced cigar smoker. The smoke time is three hours.

Would I buy this cigar again? Yes

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Categories: Honduran cigars, 92, Rocky Patel, El Paraiso | Tags: , , , | Leave a comment

Charatan Colina Robusto

Charatan Colina Robusto. The name Charatan might not be known to many cigar smokers unless you are familiar with the British market. Charatan is a brand founded in Britain, and only available there for now. The brand was founded by Frederick Charatan in 1863 as a pipe brand. He carved Meerschaum pipes and briar pipes. Frederik’s son Reuben took over the business and until 1960, it was a family business. Dunhill Tobacco of London acquired the brand and launched Charatan pipe tobaccos, which were a success. And in the early 21st century, Charatan cigars came on the market. These cigars were blended specifically to the preferences of the British cigar smokers. The brand quickly became the best selling new world cigar in the United Kingdom.


Fast forward, 2 years ago, the British tobacco distributor Tor Imports acquired the brand. The production was moved to Joya de Nicaragua and the blend was tweaked to attract a new generation of cigar smokers. Ministry of Cigars reviewed the new blend last year. Tor Imports also released a limited edition to commemorate the ownership. The Charatan Colina. And that name has a meaning. Colina means hill. Tor means hill. Add that Tor Imports is located on top of a hill in Devon, U.K., and you will see the significance of the name. The cigar is made in one size only, 5½x52, in limited production. The filler is all Nicaraguan. The binder and wrapper are Indonesian. Besuki for the binder, and shade-grown tobacco from Java as a wrapper.


The wrapper is dark for a shade-grown wrapper. The ring looks very much like a Davidoff ring, white with golden dots, but not as high quality as Davidoff. The logo has a unicorn, which embodies the craft and heritage of Charatan. It is a symbol of mythology, individuality, and as the national animal of Scotland – of quintessential Britishness. The wrapper is dark, Colorado Maduro colored with beautiful smudges. The triple cap is gorgeous, and the cigar feels well constructed. The cigar has a strong aroma. Green spices, stock cubes, that kind of aroma.


The cold draw is great. And once lit, the cigar is earthy, spicy with a little salt. The cigar remains slightly salty, with herbal flavors, a little coffee, and soil. There is a little bit of grass and sweetness too, that show up in the retrohale. The flavors are smooth, mellow, and balanced. The cigar slowly develops more of a spice flavor palate. Nutmeg, cinnamon, allspice., but with some earthiness, leather, and pepper. The sweetness becomes stronger, with a citrus sourness. There is also a slight nuttiness. The cigar gets more character, without losing the smoothness. More dry flavors, such as hay and dried wood. But still with the pepper, the spices, and the nuttiness. The final third starts sweet with nuts, pepper, and spices. The sweetness is like liquid sugar. The sweetness slowly evolves to marzipan though. With nuts, spices, pepper, leather, and wood.


The draw is great. The ash is like a stack of white and gray dimes. The smoke is good, blueish, and decent in volume and thickness. The burn is quite straight and slow. The cigar starts smooth, mellow, and well balanced but lacks character at first. That character shows up later, without losing the balance and smoothness. This is a medium-bodied cigar, medium-full flavored with an interesting evolution. The smoke time is three hours

Would I buy this cigar again? I want a box
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Categories: Nicaraguan cigars, 92, Fabrica de Tabacos Joya de Nicaragua, Charatan | Tags: , , , , | Leave a comment

VegaFina 1998 VF52

VegaFina 1998 VF52. Tabacalera, the Spanish tobacco monopoly, founded VegaFina in 1998. Later Tabacalera merged with the French tobacco monopoly SEITA and formed Altadis. And last year, Altadis released the VegaFina 1998 in three sizes to commemorate the fact. The cigars are available on International markets only, and not in the USA. VegaFina has always focussed more on Europe than on the American market anyway. This blend was created by the master blenders with tobacco from five different countries. All the tobacco is aged for at least three years. The VegaFina 1998 is marketed as a premium offering from VegaFina, yet the prices are mid-range.


The complex blend of the cigar forced the blenders to bring their A-game. A dark Ecuadorian wrapper combined with an Indonesian binder from Java. For those that don’t know Indonesia that well, Java is the most populated of the 16.000 islands that make Indonesia what it is. For the last 400 years, tobacco is cultivated after the Dutch colonists brought tobacco seeds from their travels to the Caribbean. Sumatra, about 3 ½ times bigger than Java, is also a well-known tobacco-growing island. The filler comes from the Dominican Republic, Nicaragua, and Colombia. For this review, we selected the 5½x52 VF52


The wrapper is dark and oily. It does not have a smooth appearance, but the darkness and oil make up for it. The ring is different than the current VegaFina offerings. No slick logo with the silver VegaFina uses nowadays. This ring looks older. It’s probably the same design as VegaFina used in 1998. A throwback, going with the theme of commemorating the first VegaFina release. The slick black secondary ring with the white 1998 numbers looks good. The cigar has a nice bounce when gently squeezed. The aroma is mild woody.


The cold draw is great. There isn’t much flavor in the cold draw, just peppery wood, but mild. The cigar starts with coffee, green herbs, salt, and wood. The flavors evolve to coffee, wood, leather, and pepper. The mouthfeel is dry. Softwood pepper, spices, coffee, and earthiness. More pepper and some grassy flavors show up, and the cigar tastes a little burned. Halfway there is a mixture of green herbs, pepper, and nuts. The final third has wood, soil, and pepper. For a while, there was some faint vanilla flavor as well. The finale is earthy with pepper, wood, and sweetness.


The draw is a bit on the loose side, yet still acceptable. The ash is frayed. The burn had to be corrected a few times. The smoke is good. This is a medium-bodied, medium flavored cigar. It’s not smooth and the balance is a little off as well. The smoke time is two hours thirty-five.

Would I buy this cigar again? Meh

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Categories: 89, Casa de Garcia, Dominican cigars, VegaFina | Tags: , , , ,

Joya de Nicaragua Antano CT Robusto

Joya de Nicaragua Antano CT Robusto. In the United States, Joya de Nicaragua used to be known for the strong, bold cigars. Especially the Joya de Nicaragua Antaño lines carried that stigma. Both the Antaño and the Antaño Dark Corojo are on the fuller side of the spectrum. In Europe, Joya de Nicaragua made a name for itself with the milder Clasico line. But in the last few years, Joya de Nicaragua is releasing medium strong and mild cigars with the Joya Red, Silver, Black, and the Uno. And since last year, there is even a Connecticut Shade wrapped Joya de Nicaragua Antaño. The Joya de Nicaragua Antaño CT series. And Connecticut Shade is the exact opposite of a strong wrapper.


Last year, Joya de Nicaragua released the Antaño CT. With all Nicaraguan filler and a Nicaraguan binder. As the wrapper, an Ecuadorian Connecticut Shade was chosen. There are four sizes available, from the 6×54 Belicoso to the 5 ¼ x46 Corona Gorda. In between, you’ll find a 6×50 Toro and this 5×52 Robusto. Juan Martinez from Joya de Nicaragua gave me this cigar at the 2019 Intertabac trade show.


The cigar doesn’t look appealing due to the yellowish-brown color of the wrapper. There is a vein on the wrapper and the triple cap is sloppy. The ring makes up for it. Bright golden with red, clean and clear. The cigar feels well made. It’s evenly filled. The aroma is nice and strong. The cigar has a smell much like sawdust.


The cold draw is perfect, the ideal amount of resistance. And the flavor is strong, bold. Peppery raw tobacco, which is a promising sign. Once lit, there is sweetness, vinegar, and that classic Connecticut Shade mustiness with leather and sawdust. The cigar remains smooth with sweetness, mustiness, and leather. Slowly the wood is getting stronger and a little pepper shows up. The wood and sweetness now overpower that classic Connecticut Shade mustiness. There is also some hay in the flavor profile. The second third starts sweet with hints of dried leather, earthiness, spices, and pepper. The mouthfeel is creamy, something that is to be expected from a Connecticut Shade cigar. The final third has more pepper, but the sweetness remains the same. There is also a hint of milk chocolate.


The draw is phenomenal. The silver-gray ash is extremely dense. The smoke is thick, white and there is plenty of it. The burn is straight. This is a smooth cigar, medium-bodied and medium flavored. The smoke time is two hours

Would I buy this cigar again? It’s not bad for a Connecticut Shade, but I prefer different wrappers

number91

Categories: 91, Fabrica de Tabacos Joya de Nicaragua, Joya de Nicaragua, Nicaraguan cigars | Tags: , , , , ,

Kristoff GC Signature Series Robusto

Kristoff GC Signature Series Robusto. Glen Case hit a mid-life crisis in the early 2000s and wanted to do something else than the financial services he provided for close to 20 years. As an avid cigar aficionado, he pursued a dream of becoming a cigar brand owner. And he did. In 2004 he founded Kristoff cigars, named after his son Christopher. After doing his homework, Case settled for the Charles Fairmorn factory in the Dominican Republic as his manufacturing partner. And now, 16 years later, the Kristoff cigars are sold in every corner of the world. And praised by cigar magazines and cigar blogs for years.


The Kristoff GC Signature Series was released mid-2011 at the IPCPR Trade Show. The blend was created for the cigar smoker with a well-educated palate and who likes a full-bodied cigar. To create a blend with notes that would entice these experienced, demanding smokers Case and the blenders used a Brazilian Maduro wrapper. For the binder, they took a Dominican leaf. The filler consists of all Cuban seed tobacco, from Nicaragua, Honduras, and the Dominican Republic. The robusto that we are reviewing measures 5½x54.


Kristoff cigars always look cool. The pigtail and closed foot are always bonus points for looks. The thick, dark and oily Brazilian Maduro wrapper isn’t the cleanest looking wrapper ever. But for a Brazilian wrapper, it looks good. And it looks very tasty. The ring is quite simple, yet the embossing and that the red on the front fades to back make it stand out. The cigar feels well made. The aroma is divine, dark chocolate with a little spice although the aroma could be a bit stronger.


The cold draw is always an issue with closed footed cigars. But once lit, that issue is solved. Pepper with espresso, strong, in your face. The flavors then turn a bit more to wood and dry leather. But the dark chocolate that was promised shows up too. As always with a closed foot, the start of the cigar is a little rough, it’s hard to get the burn going. The retrohale gives notes of dried fruit. Dark chocolate is the main attraction, with spice, coffee, wood, and dried fruit as support. After a third, there’s still dark chocolate with creamy, thick sweetness, leather, wood, and mild black pepper. But there is also a salty flavor. The dark chocolate and dried fruit are the baselines, with a growing pepper flavor. There’s also more sweetness and a little citrus. The chocolate flavor is thick, it’s like slowly melting a piece of 70% dark chocolate in your mouth. It coats the whole palate. The final third still has that dark chocolate with dried fruit. But there is also pepper, spice, leather, and an earthy flavor. The chocolate remains the strongest flavor, yet the pepper grows. And there is still some wood as well. Near the end, a nut flavor shows up as well, while the pepper mellows out. Hazelnuts to be precise.


The draw is great, after a rocky start. But that rocky start is normal with a closed foot. The burn is good. The white ash is quite firm. The smoke is sufficient, but it would be nicer if the smoke was thicker. The cigar is balanced yet a little rough around the edges. In a good way, it’s not smooth. But it shows character with balance, and that’s always good. The flavors are both in your face, yet with subtle flavors beyond the baseline flavors. That makes the cigar intriguing. The smoke time is two hours and forty-five minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? I want boxes!
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Categories: Dominican cigars, 92, Kristoff, Charles Fairmorn | Tags: , , , ,

Pachuche Liga Roja Robusto

Pachuche Liga Roja Robusto. Pachuche is a brand we had never heard of until last September. The Swiss brand has been available for a few years, but only in Switzerland. Yet they are ready to expand, and secured distribution in Norway so far. Pachuche shared a booth with Viking Cigars at the Intertabac trade show, and Viking introduced us to Camillo Bazzell. Pachuche is Dominican slang for torcedor, a cigar roller.


The Liga Rojo is the second blend created out of the four Pachuche blends. It was created by Christian Bazzell, Camillo’s father, with the help of master blender William Ventura. The cigar is made with Dominican filler and binder. The wrapper is Mexican San Andres. There are three sizes available, we smoked the 5×50 Robusto for this review. The artwork on the cigar is designed by the half Mexican, half Swiss artist Patrick Küng, a childhood friend of Camillo Bazzell. Küng used his Mexican heritage as an inspiration.


The cigar looks good. The pastel green ring has a very detailed Mexican skull. The metallic foot ring makes clear what line of Pachuche you are smoking. The leathery wrapper is dark, almost Oscuro. But it’s oily, with tooth and almost without veins. The construction feels good. The cigar has a strong aroma of leather and wood.


The cold draw is good. It tastes like dry tobacco and raisin. Once lit, the cigar has a nice flavor of dark wood like oak. But with leather, soil and a little bit of a dark roast coffee. All very balanced and smooth on the palate. That changes to more leather, with grass, herbs, sweetness, and pepper. The second third starts with toast, leather, wood, and pepper. The flavors then become leather with pepper. But there’s also some chocolate and floral notes. The cocoa becomes a little stronger. In the final third, there is hay, leather, wood, chocolate, and a lot of pepper.


The white ash is dense and firm. The draw is good. The smoke is decent. The burn is pretty even as well. The cigar is well balanced, smooth and has character. It is a medium-full bodied cigar, full-flavored. The flavors are crisp. The smoke time is an hour and forty-five minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? Yes

number92

Categories: 92, Dominican cigars, Pachuche, Tabacalera William Ventura | Tags: , , ,

Hoyo de Monterrey Epicure #2

Hoyo de Monterrey Epicure #2. A true classic. This cigar has been around for more than 60 years, and it is one of the most praised and sold cigars from Cuba. But the Hoyo de Monterrey brand itself has an even longer history. At ate 13, Don José Gener y Batet, migrated from Spain to Cuba. There he worked on his uncle’s tobacco farm in the Vuelta Abajo region. In his early 30s, around 1850, he started a cigar factory in Havana and started producing cigars. His brand was La Escepción. That brand was faded out in the 1980s although in the last decade the brand name was used twice for an Italian regional edition. With the profits of La Escepción, Don José Gener purchased the best tobacco he could find and in 1865 he used that tobacco for his new creation: Hoyo de Monterrey.

Where La Escepción was known for its strength, Hoyo de Monterrey is a mild Cuban cigar. The cigar performed particularly well in the United Kingdom, and due to the success, the factory grew to be one of the biggest in Cuba. When Gener passed away, his daughter took over the business. In 1931 the brands and the factory were sold to Fernández, Palicio y Cía. Fernández, Palicio y Cía owned Punch and Belinda and remained to own the brands until Cuba was ‘liberated’ and all businesses were nationalized.

This is a decent looking cigar. A nice Colorado colored wrapper, not very oily though. There is a thin, sharp vein on the front of the cigar. Both rings are well printed with high-quality bronze dusting. Even though you might think “bronze, it’s gold”, you are right. Yet the process is called bronze dusting. The triple cap looks great. On the touch, the cigar feels good. There is a mild ammonia aroma coming from the cigar, with fresh greens like leaves in the autumn.

The cold draw is a bit tight. It’s slightly salty with wood. Once lit, the cigar is sweet, sour, and bitter. Coffee bitterness with vinegar and salt is the best way to describe the first puffs. It then changes to salty peanuts, with some leather and earthiness. Plenty of dynamics in the first third, as the flavors progress to salty herbs with wood. Halfway the cigar gets a nice peppery flavor with hazelnuts. The retrohale has sweetness and vanilla. There is a slight Cappucino flavor halfway with herbs. The mouthfeel is quite dry. The pepper grows in strength, tingling on the lips as a good chili pepper does. There is some vanilla sweetness as well, with leather and soil on the background. The aftertaste is mild minty. It changes to pepper and nuts.

The draw is acceptable, slightly tight but still acceptable. The ash is dark, indicating that the soil the tobacco was grown on is low on potassium. The cigar turns very soft after being lit. The burn had to be touched up a few times. The smoke is thin, and there isn’t a lot of it in volume either. But the volume and the thickness of the smoke progress. This cigar is medium-bodied, and while it starts medium flavored it grows to medium-full. The smoke time is two hours.

Would I buy this cigar again? It was enjoyable, but there are Cuban cigars I enjoy more in the same price range.

Categories: 89, Cuban cigars, Hoyo de Monterrey (Habanos) | Tags: , , ,

Hiram & Solomon Shriner Robusto

Hiram & Solomon Shriner Robusto. One of the seven blends available within the Hiram & Solomon portfolio but the only one without the Freemason logo. The recipe is the same though. Made in Nicaragua, blended by Fouad Kashouty and George Dakrat with the help of David Blanco. And produced at the renowned Plasencia Cigars factory in Esteli. And as true freemasons, Hiram & Solomon donate parts of the proceeds of the cigars to charity. The brand started as a fundraiser. The idea was to create a one-off cigar for an event, but the cigars became so popular that it resulted in one of the fastest-growing family-owned cigar brands on the market nowadays.

The size of the cigar caused some confusion. The sticker on the cellophane mentions 5×52. That is also mentioned in the vitola list on the website, yet, at the pictures of the cigars, another size is mentioned. 5½x50 instead of 5×52. Cigar nerds as we are, we grabbed our Herics cigar measuring tape to see which information is correct. The cigar measures 5×52. The wrapper is Ecuadorian Sumatra. The binder comes from Indonesia, maybe even the real Sumatra but the specifics have not been disclosed. To make this a five-country blend cigar, fillers from Brazil, Dominican Republic, and two tobaccos from Nicaragua were selected.

The Colorado colored wrapper has a water spot. Quite a large one. But that doesn’t matter and it would be unfair to deduct points. Why? Because we have a few more of these that don’t have ugly spots. Cigars are a natural product, and a water spot can happen. It doesn’t alter the flavor, it is just aesthetically not the best look. The ring, compared to the other Hiram & Solomon cigars, this is lacking the Freemason logo. But the sword and the crest probably have a meaning in the Masonic world. The maroon colored ring is decent yet pale in comparison to the other Hiram & Solomon rings. The wrapper is silky without veins and has some tooth. The cigar feels well constructed. The aroma is strong, barnyard, and hay.

The cold draw is fine, with a dry raw tobacco and raisin flavor. Sweetness with spices, coffee, and earthiness are released from the first puff on. With some red pepper. The flavor has hints of straw and hay, but with some sweetness, spice, and earthiness. There is a little cinnamon in the retrohale, with cedar. After an inch, there is a salty flavor, with honey sweetness, hay, and some slight white pepper. After a third, the flavor turns to sweet, young wood with milk chocolate. The cigar keeps giving that slight woody flavor with sweetness, spice, milk chocolate but now with some leather as well. The sweetness turns to marzipan. Add in a little nuttiness, gingerbread spices, and some white pepper and you have the start of the final third. The last few puffs, nut flavors are strong.

The draw is good and the burn is straight. The ash is quite firm even though it’s frayed. The smoke is white, reasonably thick and the volume is good too. It’s a smooth cigar, no rough edges. But at the same time, it’s lacking some character, it’s pretty middle of the road. Perfect for a cup of coffee late morning. The cigar is smooth, medium-bodied, and medium flavored. The smoke time is two hours and forty minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? I will pick the Hiram & Solomon Fellow Craft over this.

Categories: 90, Hiram & Solomon, Nicaraguan cigars, Tabacos de Oriente Nicaragua | Tags: , , , ,

Don Duarte Reserva Robusto

Don Duarte Reserva Robusto. A brand that may not ring a bell with many cigar smokers. But it has a history to it. About a decade ago, the brand had some traction in Europe. But due to health-related reasons, Roger Duarte Rodriguez had to put everything on hold. Now the brand is back and available in a few countries. The Nicaraguan puro with the H2000 Oscuro wrapper that we are reviewing is from the personal stash of Don Duarte and has been aged for a decade.


The great grandparents of Don Roger Duarte Rodriguez, Don Rafael Rodriguez, and Juana Lanuza de Rodriguez, were one of the founders of Esteli. Don Rafael Rodriguez was a tobacco grower and one of the first to export tobacco out of Nicaragua. And his great grandmother on the Duarte side, Dona Maria Duarte Boza, owned a small tobacco manufacturing plant in Masaya. They processed tobacco from Ometepe and turned them into small cigars called Chilcagres. So tobacco runs through the blood of the Managua born entrepreneur. He acted as President of Tabacalera Tropical, which is now known as Aganorsa Leaf. That’s where he met the legendary Evelio Oviedo who blended the Don Duarte cigars.


The cigar has a closed foot. That always gets a cigar a few bonus points for aesthetic reasons. The wrapper is dark, leathery, oily and beautiful. The brown ring fades away on the dark wrapper. The secondary ring is gold with black text. The triple cap is beautiful. And even after ten years, the cigar still has a nice, medium-strong aroma of wood and barnyard. The construction feels good.


The cold draw is tight, due to the closed foot. But there is flavor in the cold draw. Gingerbread comes to mind and black pepper. The first flavors after lighting the cigar are wood, leather, spices, and a pleasant sweetness. Some pepper and coffee show up as well but mellowed out after a decade of aging. The aging also makes the cigar easy to retrohale. In the second third, there is more pepper but again mellow. With spices, leather, and even a hint of chocolate. Slowly there are coffee flavors, spices, leather, and even a little fruity acidity. Near the end, the cigar gains a lot of pepper, spice, but there is also some sweetness, wood, and leather.


The draw is great. The ash is white. The white blueish smoke is sufficient but could be a little thicker. The cigar is mellow, smoothed out due to the decade of aging. It’s still medium-bodied, medium flavored though. The cigar is well balanced, it has character. The smoke time is two hours and fifteen minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? Yes, no doubt

number92

Categories: Nicaraguan cigars, 92, Plasencia, Don Duarte | Tags: , , , ,

Asylum 13 Oblongata

Asylum 13 Medulla Oblongata, a line introduced at the IPCPR 2017 but only introduced to the international markets in 2019. An interesting concept, where two cigars with an identical blend and size are sold but in a different shape. The Medulla is a round cigar. The Oblongata is box-pressed. And the Medulla Oblongata is the part of the brain that controls involuntary reactions. Breathing, coughing, sneezing, hiccups etcetera. And now the brain has to decide which of the two is the best. The round Medulla or the box-pressed Oblongata.


The blend is identical to the Asylum 13 Corojo. It’s an all Honduran cigar with a Corojo wrapper. The only difference is the priming of the tobacco. The Asylum 13 Medulla Oblongata utilizes tobacco from higher priming. By using leaves from the higher of the plant, the flavor profile is different than the original Asylum 13 Corojo. The cigars are rolled in the El Aladino factory in Danli. The factory is owned by Christian Eiroa. Asylum Cigars is a partnership between Eiroa and Tom Lazuka.


Just like the Medulla, the cigar is wrapped in wax paper for ¾ of the cigar. Once removed, the Colorado colored Corojo wrapper is revealed. It does have some veins, but thinner than the ones on the Medulla. The cigar has the right amount of bounce when softly squeezed. And just like the Medulla, the aroma is medium strong. It’s dried wood and stable as well.


The cold draw is a bit tight. And the flavors are pepper, raw tobacco with a minty freshness. The Oblongata starts exactly like the Medulla. Muted, salty, and dusty. With a little bit of nutmeg. The salt remains, some cedar shows up too. But all still muted. There is some leather as well. Slowly the cigar gets more sweetness, more cedar, and some pepper. The cedar is stronger in the retrohale. The second third starts salty, with pepper, green herbs, cedar, and leather. The cigar turns more spicy and salty, with leather, cedar, and earthiness. The flavors remain the same throughout the third part. There seems to be less evolution than in the Medulla.


The draw is better after the cigar is lit. The ash is white and dense. The cigar is smooth, balanced. The burn is beautifully straight. The smoke could be a little thicker though, and bigger in volume. Although it picks up in the last third. This cigar is medium in body and strength. But it’s smooth and balanced throughout the cigar. The smoke time is two hours and fifteen minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? Maybe

number90

Categories: 90, Asylum, El Aladino, Honduran cigars | Tags: , , , , , ,

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