Posts Tagged With: robusto

Black Label Trading Company Royalty Robusto

Black Label Trading Company Royalty Robusto. A relatively new, edgy brand, that saw the light in 2013. James and Angela were tour operators in Costa Rica. But they took their clients to Nicaragua as well and where do you take visitors when you’re in Nicaragua? To tobacco plantations and cigar factories of course. James started to blend cigars and sell them. The feedback was so overwhelming that the couple decided to start a brand. To keep control of everything, they even started a factory of their own.


The Royalty is a core line for Black Label Trading Company and has been there from the start in 2013. The cigar is made with Nicaraguan fillers. The binder comes from Honduras and the wrapper is Ecuadorian. But not Connecticut Shade of Sumatra, Ecuadorian tobaccos that are used a lot, but Ecuadorian Corojo. The cigar is only available in three sizes, we reviewed the 5×54 Robusto.


The cigar is beautiful. Smooth, leathery with a few flats veins. Quite dark. The ring is very dark with a skull, very scary, macabre. The foot ring says Royalty in a font that fits with the skull. The cigar feels a little spongy but evenly spongy. The medium-strong aroma is that of wood, chopped wood.


The cold draw is great. The flavor is dry, spicy and slightly bitter raw tobacco. Once lit, there is coffee, there is some harshness from green herbs and spices. There is some pepper. Slowly wood and pepper show up too. The cigar has a little edge to it. Then honey sweetness comes into play, with more pepper. The rough edge in the flavor is gone. The second third starts with wood, pepper, and some honey. The wood, leather, and pepper are the main attraction. Near the end, the cigar becomes salty.


The ash is like a stack of dimes. Light gray, with beautiful layers. The burn is quite straight and pretty. The smoke is great. Thick and white. The cigar has plenty of character. This is a medium-full bodied cigar, medium-full flavored as well. With a smoke time of an hour and forty-five minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? Yes

number91

Categories: 91, Black Label Trading Company, Nicaraguan cigars | Tags: , , ,

Camacho Ecuador Robusto

Camacho Ecuador Robusto. In 2008, Oettinger Davidoff acquired the Camacho brand, farms, and factory from the Eiroa family. And while Davidoff continued with the exciting Camacho blends for the first years, behind the scenes they were ready for a relaunch. In 2013, that relaunch hit the markets. Under the ‘Bold’ name, Davidoff reblended some of the Camacho lines and introduced stunning new packaging. A few new blends were added. The big gamble paid off and a year later a new line edition was added. That’s the Camacho Ecuador.


The Camacho Ecuador is made with Corojo, Criollo Ligero and Pelo de Oro from Honduras and the Dominican Republic as filler. It’s being held together with a Brazilian Mata Fina binder. And finally, an Ecuadorian Habano wrapper finishes the cigar. It comes in several sizes, but for this review, I smoked the 5×50 Robusto. While the Camacho factory was called Rancho Jamastran when it was owned by the Eiroa family, Davidoff changed the factory to Agroindustras Laepe, S.A. In 2016, a brand new factory was opened, designed by the Honduran architect Gonzalo Nunez Dias.

The cigar looks great. A nice, oily, dark wrapper. A perfectly shaped head. And that iconic label, copied by several other brands including Toraño. The black scorpion, the logo of the Camacho Bold series, is prominently visible on the ring. The construction feels good, it seems like and evenly packed cigar. The cigar has a nice leather aroma to it, medium strong.


The cold draw is great, perfect resistance. The flavor is a dry wood and tobacco flavor, with some spice in the aftertaste. After lighting, the first flavors are salt, coffee, pepper. It evolves to marzipan sweetness with leather, wood, soil, and toast with a peppery aftertaste. The wood, which is classic cedar, combines perfectly with the sweetness. But there is a little roughness in the flavors, it’s not well rounded. The sweetness and cedar remain the main flavors, with some spices, pepper, and dry leather. After a third, the cigar gets darker in flavors. The cedar turns to oak, there is more pepper. The flavors are better-rounded now. Halfway some toast shows up as well. In the last part, it’s mainly oak, with pepper, hay, some leather, and pepper.


The draw is very good. The ash is light-colored, dense and firm. A good volume of white smoke. The burn is pretty straight. But the flavors, although nice, aren’t well rounded. This is a medium to full-bodied cigar, medium flavored. The smoke time is two hours and fifteen minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? Maybe

number90

Categories: 90, Agroindustria LAEPE S.A, Camacho, Honduran cigars | Tags: , , ,

Alfambra G series Robusto

Alfambra G series Robusto. A cigar completely unknown to us. And not just to us, as there is hardly any information to be found on the company online. Nothing more than just the blend, the name of the factory and the sizes they produce. But the brand is available in several European markets, so Ministry of Cigars took the time to smoke the Alfambra G Series Robusto for a review.


From the little information that we found online, we learned that this is a Nicaraguan cigar. Now we figured that out before, as they have a second line called El Brujito. And that’s a shaman from old cave paintings found in Esteli. Drew Estate uses that same painting and name for its Nica Rustica line. This Alfambra G Series doesn’t use the El Brujito though. The cigar is made from Nicaraguan fillers and a Nicaraguan binder. The wrapper is an Ecuadorian Habano.

 

The first impression isn’t that good. The cellophane itself feels like cheap, low quality plastic instead of proper cellophane. The wrapper itself has a nice Colorado to Colorado Maduro color. It’s a bit rough and there is even a small hole in the wrapper at the back, exposing the binder. Now, this is a budget bundle cigar, so they get away with it. But for a premium cigar, this would be a big no. The dark green and gold ring is fine. But it won’t stand out in a humidor. The cigar itself feels well constructed. The aroma is strong and smells like hay.

The cold draw is a bit tight. It leaves flavors of spices, raisins, and tobacco on the lips. After lighting, the cigar is pleasantly sweet with a white pepper aftertaste. The tobacco tastes a little rough though. Unfortunately, there’s also a little sourness, as in milk gone bad that does not please the palate. The sweetness is strong enough to overpower that, making the cigar still tolerable. Slowly some smooth soil and leather join the sourness and sweetness. The sourness is dragging this cigar down. After a third, the sourness fades away but now the cigar turns musty and dry. Sweet, with pepper, leather, wood but dry. Slowly some toast shows up too, while the sweetness loses its strength. And there is a mushroom flavor. Chewy, like portobello. At the end of the second third, the cigar tastes like pepper, spices, soil, wood, and leather. No character, a little harsh but at least the sourness and the mustiness are gone. The final third packs more strength, more pepper, more leather but with some vanilla and floral notes. More spices show up too, nutmeg, cinnamon, those kinds of spices. All dressed in a strong pepper flavor.


The construction is flawless. Beautiful burn, great draw. The light gray ash is a bit flaky and not too firm. This is a medium-bodied, medium flavored cigar. Unrefined, unbalanced. The smoke time is two hours and ten minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? No

number85

Categories: 85, Alfambra, Nicaraguan cigars | Tags: , , ,

Bugatti Ambassador Robusto

Bugatti Ambassador Robusto. One of the many blends available from the brand connected to the luxury supercars with the same name. And having a private label cigar isn’t the only connection to the cigar industry. Bugatti has its own line of accessories too. But back to the cigars, the Bugatti range goes from mild to strong. There’s are lines called Belstaff Bond, Boss Classic, Ambassador, Medio, Potere, Quattro Claro, Quattro Maduro, Scuro, and Signature. Now due to legislation, these cigars can’t be distributed everywhere. In The Netherlands for example, where the cars would be considered advertising for the cigars (yes, really!!) and advertising of tobacco is prohibited.


For the review, we smoked the Ambassador. This cigar is made at PDR Cigars on the Dominican Republic. That’s where most Bugatti cigars are made, although the brand also works with Kelner Boutique Factory for the smaller lines. The Bugatti Ambassador Robusto is a 5×52 cigar with an Ecuadorian Habano wrapper. The binder comes from the Dominican Republic. The filler is a four-country blend. Tobaccos from the Dominican, Brazil, Nicaragua, and Pennsylvania (USA) are used.


The Colorado colored wrapper is mildly oily. It has a few distinct veins and is middle of the road looking. The rings are nice. The Bugatti ring has a carbon fiber look with the Bugatti logo. It has that supercar race look. The secondary ring is a metallic red with silver metallic letters. The triple cap looks good. The cigar feels a bit hard but evenly hard. There are no soft spots. The cigar has a barnyard aroma, hay, and animals.


The cold draw is great. It has a lot of sweetness, yet also a peppery raw tobacco flavor. The first puffs are coffee with sweetener, soil, and pepper. A few puffs later, there’s also leather and old wood. The sweetness turns from artificial to crystal sugar. Balanced, with character. Enjoyable. In the second part, the cigar has pepper, carrot flavors, sweetness, and soil. There are also traces of hay, coffee, and leather. Then the final third arrives, the cigar is all about sweet coffee and pepper again.


The draw is great. The ash is dark, frayed yet firm and strong. The smoke is thick, great in volume and beautifully white. The burn is nice and quite straight. This is a medium-bodied, medium flavored cigar. Enjoyable yet not memorable. Well balanced. The smoke time is one hour and forty minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? Every once in a while
number89

Categories: 89, Bugatti, Dominican cigars, PDR Cigars | Tags: , , , ,

Alec Bradley Project 40 05.50

Alec Bradley Project 40 05.50 Robusto. Earlier this year, Alec Bradley released Project 40. Alan Rubin, owner and founder of the cigar brand, found inspiration in science. “Project 40 is a generally accepted concept in multiple industries with the end goal to find how a service or product can have a positive impact on the mind and body. Since cigars bring people together, cause for relaxation and create positive experiences, I asked myself why this concept should not be applied to premium cigars. This was my inspiration for Alec Bradley Project 40,” Rubin said. Rubin is a firm believer that cigars have a calming effect. And that belief is backed by several scientific research projects. It is a science-based fact that if people relax and wind down, the stress levels drop. And lower stress means a lower risk of cardiac arrest and other illnesses. And smoking cigars forces you to slow down and relax. Therefore a cigar is stress-reducing.

To make the cigars, Alec Bradley went to Nicaragua. But not to their regular address in Nicaragua, Plasencia Cigars. Instead, they picked J. Fuego to roll the Project 40 blend. The blend is made with Nicaraguan fillers and a Nicaraguan wrapper. The binder is a Brazilian Habano leaf. The cigars are named after the sizes. All are straight cigars, parejo. There is a 5×50 version called 05.50. Then there are a 06.25, a 07.50 and a 06.60. I reviewed the 05.50 robusto, a cigar Bradley Rubin gave us at the Intertabac trade show.


The Colorado colored wrapper has a big vein in the front of the cigar. The ring should have been placed differently so that the vein would be on the back, making it a more appealing cigar. The secondary ring is metallic sky blue with the words experimental series. The main ring is white with gold and a big Project 40 logo. On the backside, the whole idea behind project 40 is explained. The construction feels good. The cigar has an aroma of hay and the aroma is medium strong.


The cold draw is great. Flavors from the cold draw are raisin, wood, and raw tobacco. After lighting the first flavors are harsh, almost like medicinal cough medicine. There is some sweetness, some leather, some spices, earth, and wood. But it’s not a great start, to say the least. The harshness gets a little less strong, some cinnamon comes through. But the cigar still remains unbalanced. After a centimeter, the flavors are sweet and fresh, young wood with some pepper and spice. It slowly evolves to sweetness with wood, soil, leather, toast, pepper, and grass. Unbalanced, unrefined. After a third, it’s coffee with earthiness and sweetness, yet still, with that unrefined, slightly harsh, finish. The cigar then picks up in sweetness, pepper, and oak. The other flavors are gone. In the final third, the cigar gets more refined with sweetness, pepper, wood, and vegetal flavors. It turns to sweetness and cedar, with a hint of pepper. The cigar feels more balanced now, and even a tad creamy. The retrohale is pleasant now.


The draw is great. The ash is white and quite firm. The burn is good, not perfect but good. And the cigar produces a nice amount of white smoke. It’s a medium-bodied, medium flavored cigar. But it’s harsh, unrefined and unbalanced.

Would I buy this cigar again? Nope.

number89

Categories: 89, Alec Bradley, Nicaraguan cigars | Tags: , , , ,

Steenbok Robusto

Steenbok Robusto. This Honduran puro is a Dutch cigar brand, made at Compania Hondurena de Tabacos in El Paraiso, Honduras. That’s where brands such as Kuuts, Miro, Placeres, and Zapata are made as well. The brand is founded by two cigar aficionados, Johan Loomans and Brigitte Altena, from The Netherlands. The brand was released in 2018. The packaging of the cigars is cool, silver tins containing either the robusto, mini-robusto, or the half corona. The cigars are for sale in The Netherlands only for now.


The blend is made of all Honduran tobacco and with that, it’s one of the few Honduran puros on the market in The Netherlands. The robusto measures 5×50, the classic robusto size. Steenbok Cigars handed us this sample at the Intertabac trade show in Dortmund, Germany last September.


The ring is huge and white. But what makes it stand out is that the brand isn’t printed. The letters are cut out so the wrapper is forming the name of the cigar. Handmade in Honduras is printed though, but in a color very close to the wrapper. The wrapper is bumpy with a few veins. And right over the ring, there is some discoloration due to water drops during fermentation. The construction feels good though. The burned wood aroma is quite strong.


The cold draw is great with a mild coffee and strong tobacco flavor. Once lit, the cigar produces a sweet coffee flavor. Some grassy flavors show up and match the coffee in strength. There’s also a little bit of leather and some pepper. The cigar has quite some sweetness too, and a bit of a dusty aftertaste that is typical for Connecticut Shade. But this cigar doesn’t have a Connecticut Shade wrapper so its a question where that comes from. There’s also a little nuttiness. The flavors also get some wood and herbs. But it’s all mild and sweet. The cigar is not unpleasant but lacks character. After a third, the cigar turns very creamy, with vanilla and some more pepper. And now the cigar is getting more interesting. After two thirds, the flavors are creamy, buttery with wood and pepper. The finale brings a lot of pepper, what a difference from the start


The draw is great, and the cigar produces a good amount of smoke. The burn is great. The ash is firm but dark. The cigar is smooth and balanced. Medium-bodied at best, medium flavored. The start lacks character but the cigar gains traction halfway. The smoke time is two hours and twenty minutes

Would I buy this cigar again? Yes, it’s a nice smooth medium cigar for a very nice price
number90

Categories: 90, Honduran cigars, Steenbok | Tags: , ,

Skel Ton Robusto

A few months ago, we saw a picture of a cigar on Facebook. And that picture intrigued us. The ring of the cigar was the most unique we had seen in a while, and one of the best we had ever seen. It turned out that it was a cigar by a German aficionado, Tonio Neugebauer. He released the cigars in 2016. Ministry of Cigars published about the cigars last month. Neugebauer and Han Hilderink, owner of the Whisky & Cigar Lounge in Gronau, decided to send us a sampler. As cigar nerds, we are excited to smoke new cigars so here we go.


The cigars are made in Nicaragua, at one of the factories of Plasencia. The cigars are made with an H-Blend wrapper from Ecuador. Two binders are used, one from Indonesia and one from Nicaragua. And the filler comes from Honduras, Nicaragua and the Dominican Republic. There are only three sizes available. Those are a 6×44 Corona, a 5×54 Robusto, and a 6×52 Toro. For this review, we are smoking the 5×54 Robusto. The retail price is very reasonable at €6,90.


This cigar scores points on the looks. The ring is amazing, high-quality gold printing, a very detailed skeleton. And a cloth foot ring with the test ‘live your dreams’. 100 points for the ring alone. The wrapper looks great too, Colorado to Colorado Maduro in color. Evenly colored with thin, sharp veins. The cigar feels well constructed. The aroma is deep manure, earthy smell. It’s medium-strong.


The cold draw is perfect. The flavor in the cold draw is quite dry, dry cedar, hay, and raisin. The first puffs give me that dry flavor again, earthy, leathery with coffee. There’s also a pleasant, spiced sweetness and freshness which comes close to anise. To all changes to gingerbread spices with a mild sweetness and some citrus. Combined with cedarwood. The sweetness gets stronger, it’s like powdered sugar. The spices and the wood are still noticeable too. The mouthfeel is dry. After a third, it’s sweet coffee again. Halfway the flavors are a mix of leather, grass, spices and a little pepper. All with a pleasant dose of sweetness and a little citrus acidity. In the final third, the wood returns and it’s strong. With pepper and leather. But still smooth and balanced. Coffee returns too, all with sweetness and even a little custard creaminess. The gingerbread spices, pepper, sweetness, and wood are the dominant flavors in the last part of the cigar.


The draw is great. And the ash is white and firm. The burn is razor-sharp. The smoke is thick and white. This cigar is medium-bodied, medium to full-flavored with a pleasant smoothness. The flavors are balanced all the way through the cigar. The smoke time is two hours and twenty minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? I want a box

number92

Categories: 92, Nicaraguan cigars, Skel Ton, Tabacalera del Oriente | Tags: , , ,

CAO Nicaragua Tipitata

CAO Nicaragua Tipitata. CAO started with country-inspired blends before the company founder Cano Ozgener sold the brand to tobacco giant Scandinavian Tobacco Group. And STG is the parent of General Cigars, so CAO is now part of that family. When STG moved CAO from Tennessee to their headquarters in Virginia, some of the staff refused to move and started Crowned Heads. That’s when Rick Rodriguez was promoted by General Cigars to be the blender and face of the CAO brand. And he continued with the country inspired series.

Most cigar smokers have seen, heard about the CAO Brazil, CAO America, CAO Colombia and the CAO Italia. And probably smoked a fair amount as they are very popular. So for the next of the CAO country-inspired blends, Rodriguez went back to the CAO roots: CAO Nicaragua. The cigar utilizes Nicaraguan tobacco from different regions in the filler and binder. But it’s not a Nicaraguan puro. The blend worked better with a wrapper from Jamastran, Honduras. Jamastran borders the Jalapa valley, it’s just on the Honduran side of the border.

The colorado colored wrapper has a nice shine. But it also has some veins. The cigar feels well constructed. The cap is decent. The ring is in accordance to the country inspired series. The same shape, with Nicaraguan blue and white. The details and letters are in gold, with a red CAO logo. The consistency of the rings in the series is good. The aroma is strong. Cedar, barnyard, sheep and hay is what comes to mind.

The cold draw is flawless. Peppery raisins are the flavor that is released from the cold draw. The start is classic. Coffee, leather, some cinnamon-like spices, and pepper. Basic, yet well balanced and nice. This is not a front-loaded cigar that blows you away from the start. Then the flavors change to more of dry leaves, mushroom flavor with leather and grass. There’s also some sweetness, and after a centimeter, there is a cedar flavor as well. The flavors are a bit dusty and musty though. All of a sudden the cigar has a mild gingerbread flavor with more sweetness and some citrus. Halfway I taste some vanilla with cedar and spices. The final third has a minty fresh aftertaste. And nuts, with cedar and pepper.

The ash is white, dense and firm. The smoke is decent in volume and thickness. The draw is great. The burn is straight. This cigar is medium-bodied and medium flavored. The smoke time is two hours and fifteen minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? Nah
number90

Categories: 90, CAO, Nicaraguan cigars, STG Nicaragua | Tags: , , ,

Kafie 1901 Sumatra Robusto

Kafie 1901 Sumatra Robusto. The Kafie 1901 brand was founded by Dr. Gaby Kafie. Dr. Kafie’s roots are lay in Honduras, where he was born. His ancestors moved to Latin America from Europe in 1901, that’s why 1901 is prominent in the name. Dr. Gaby Kafie moved to the United States and became a physician. Yet, his Honduran roots, the family history in tobacco and his love for cigars and coffee brought him back to Honduras. He started his Tabacalera, Tabacalera Kafie. That factory now includes a cellophane making facility, cigar production, and a box factory. It’s Dr. Kafie’s mission to keep the cigar culture and tradition alive in Honduras. With a decreasing number of factories remaining, that’s an important reason for him to promote Honduran cigars worldwide.

In 2015, the brand released the third Kafie 1901 line. That is the Kafie 1901 Sumatra. It followed the Kafie 1901 Don Fernando Maduro and the Kafie 1901 Connecticut. The cigar is made with Nicaraguan and Dominican filler. The binder is grown locally, in Honduras by the Reyes family. The wrapper is Sumatra, but not from the Indonesian island with the same name. Even though the tobacco originated in South East Asia, seeds were brought to Ecuador. And that’s why there’s so many Ecuadorian Sumatra on the market. From the four sizes available,


The cigar is good looking. A Colorado colored wrapper with a thin vein. It feels like velvet. The head is perfect, beautiful round and nice. The burgundy and gold ring is classic and clear. The name is clear, which blend is clear, the ring gives you the information you need. The cigar has a medium-strong aroma. Its a mixture of hay with the inside of a barn after the animals left to graze outside.

The cold draw is great with a spicy raw tobacco flavor. Once lit, the cigar overpowers with strong coffee and spice. There’s slight citrus on the background and in the aftertaste. After a centimeter, the flavors change. The citrus, spice, and pepper remain. The coffee mellows out and is replaced with leather. And there’s a hint of sweetness. Slowly some salt comes in play as well. Halfway the cigar changes to wood with salt, pepper, and licorice. It’s a sudden change. A few puffs later, a little cocoa shows up on the background. After two thirds, the coffee is back. With spice, pepper, and sweetness. The chocolate, wood, and leather are gone. In the final third, the cigar gets a little more pepper but also a slight harshness that doesn’t do the cigar any good.


The draw is fantastic. And the smoke is white and thick. The light-colored ash is nice and firm. This cigar is full-flavored. The body is medium to medium-full. The smoke time is one hour and twenty minutes

Would I buy this cigar again? A fiver would be nice

number90

Categories: 90, Honduran cigars, Kafie, Tabacalera La Union | Tags: , , ,

Rocky Patel LB1 Robusto

Rocky Patel LB1 Robusto. Rocky Patel makes cigars in Honduras and Nicaragua. And even though he started out in Honduras, last few years he focussed on Nicaragua for production. Almost all of the new blends came out of his Tavicusa factory in Esteli. That factory is owned by Rocky Patel and his partner Amilcar Perez. The Honduran production is made at El Paraiso, a factory owned by Plasencia. But Patel has a special relationship, which allows them to use his own methods, his own people and his own standards for his brands. It’s sort of a lease deal.


This Rocky Patel LB1 is made at that El Paraiso factory. And it’s one of the two new blends that were recently released, made in Honduras. It’s quite normal for cigars to have a factory code during the blending process, and for the LB1 Patel decided to keep that factory code as the name. The cigar is made with tobacco from Honduras and Nicaragua in the filler. The binder is also Nicaraguan. The Nicaraguan tobaccos come from Patel’s farm in Esteli. The wrapper is a Habano wrapper from Ecuador.

The cigar is a looker. A very dark yet smooth wrapper. But the foot has been cut by a drunken torcedor. When placed on a table, foot down, it leans like the Tower of Pisa. The wrapper is evenly in color and smooth. The white and copper-colored ring contrasts the darkness well. The ring is quite simple, yet a little too overwhelming. There’s too many lines, stars, shapes so it makes the ring distracting. The barnyard and manure aroma is quite strong.


The cold draw is a bit though. The flavors are leather and pepper, spicy. But it feels a bit like wet leather, making the draw a bit draggy. Once lit, its pepper and cinnamon toast with espresso. The flavors then evolve to a mixture of soil, leather, coffee, sweetness, and a hint of citrus. The cigar is mellow, and the flavors settle for cinnamon toast with a little pepper, sweetness, and grass. Halfway some wood, more soil, and leather show up, but still with the spiced toast and sweetness.


The draw is good. Better than the cold draw. The white smoke is thick and plentiful. The salt and pepper colored ash is quite firm. The cigar is mellow and well balanced. Where the darkness of the wrapper would suggest it’s a strong, full-bodied cigar, it’s actually not. It’s a medium-bodied, medium flavored, balanced and smooth cigar. The smoke time is two hours and thirty minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? Yeah, I think so.

number91

Categories: 91, El Paraiso, Honduran cigars, Rocky Patel | Tags: , , , , ,

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