Posts Tagged With: robusto

El Coyote Robusto

El Coyote Robusto. A cigar that appeared in December of 2019. First only in Belgium and Luxemburg, but the cigars are slowly available in more markets such as The Netherlands and Switzerland. The Belux importer and distributor, Central American Trading is the owner of the brand. And the cigar is the work of three people, Abe Flores, Marc D’Argembeau, and Phillipe van Wilderode.

D’Argembeau is de founder of CAT, but Van Wilderode is the owner for a few years. D’Argembeau’s logistical company is the worldwide distributor for Flores’s cigars. The trio created a three-size line with Nicaraguan filler and binder. The wrapper comes from an undisclosed country “which has become a must for quality wrappers” according to El Coyote cigars. That could be Ecuador, Mexico, Honduras, Nicaragua, or the Dominican Republic. The robusto for this review measures 5½x54.

This is a sexy-looking cigar, an intense colored wrapper, not extremely dark but the wrapper looks rich and oily. The band is stylish, gray with a silhouette of ‘El Coyote’ Phillipe van Wilderode in black, and the name in copper print. The cigar feels solid and has a nice triple cap. The cigar has an unusual aroma, strong green herbs such as lovage and parsley.

The cold draw is fine, quite dry with raw spicy tobacco as the flavor. And a little pepper on the lips. The cigar has a nice dark spice flavor, with cedar and nuts. There is a thick, creamy, dark sugar sweetness. Almost like almond paste, but with some dark sugar as a supplement. There are still dark spices, and the mouthfeel slowly becomes dry again. A little leather is a reason for the dry feel. Near the end of the first third, the cigar gives pepper. The second third starts with the almond paste again, with oak, leather, and a bit of soil. The paste flavor makes it quite a unique smoke. The retrohale is pleasant with some mild spices. The dark spices, wood, and pepper make a wonderful combination. There is balance. At the end of the second third, there is hay with pepper. In the end, it’s wood with pepper and a minty freshness. And peanuts, a surprising flavor.

The smoke is very nice, thick, white, and plenty in volume. The ash is light in color and a little frayed. The burn is nice. Straight and slow. The construction is good. This is a medium cigar in body but full in flavor with plenty of evolution. The smoke time is two and a half hours.

Would I buy this cigar again? Most definitely

Categories: 92, Dominican cigars, El Coyote, PDR Cigars | Tags: , , , , | Leave a comment

Dias de Gloria Robusto

Dias de Gloria Robusto is a tribute to the glory days of Cuban tobacco. To the cigars that Ismael Fernandez, the father of A.J. was smoking back in Cuba before he left his home country to work in Nicaragua. But of course without being able to use Cuban cigars. So A.J. went out to create a blend that resembles the old Cuban style with tobaccos from Nicaragua. The cigar was recommended to me as a great smoke.

For that, he is picking aged tobacco from his four oldest farms in Esteli. And for years, Fernandez has been setting aside tobacco with the Dias de Gloria in mind. “I want everyone to enjoy it like the glory days of old Cuba.,” he said during the release of the Dias de Gloria line.

The cigar looks good, but that doesn’t say anything about the wrapper yet. Because the wrapper is hardly visible. There is a red, yellow, and golden band with a very biblical picture. Then a golden and red secondary band with the A.J. Fernandez name and then a piece of cedar covering the rest of the cigar. With a piece of red cloth protecting the foot. Underneath the cedar is an oily, reddish-brown wrapper, smooth to the eye and velvet to the touch. The cigar feels evenly packed. The aroma is strong, hay and not surprisingly, cedar.

The cold draw is fine, cedar with dry wood. Once lit the cigar gives leather, wood, soil, coffee, and red pepper. The flavors are a little harsh, not very round. There’s also a sweetness, almost like refined sugar. But that doesn’t hide the mean punch this cigar gives. The sweetness turns more to a spiced sweetness like cinnamon. With oak, soil, and leather. The cigar still has a bit of a mean bite. It’s already tough to retrohale the cigar. Wood becomes stronger, but the cigar irritates the back of the throat. The second third starts with plenty of sweetness, now more of caramel sweetness. There’s also oak, soil, and leather with pepper. If the flavors were more round, the Dias de Gloria would be a great cigar. But that mean bite, that was there in all samples smoked, take away a lot of the pleasantries that this cigar offers. The mouthfeel is dry. A citrus acidity shows up, which helps to take away some of the roughness. There’s also a mushroom flavor with a lot of red pepper. The final third isn’t as mean, but red pepper overpowers the underlying flavors of oak and soil. There is no balance.

The draw is good and the smoke is amazing. It’s plentiful, white, and thick. The ash is white and dense. The burn is nice and straight. There is nothing bad to say about the construction of this cigar. The flavors are all right, but the mean and harsh taste definitely takes its toll on the score. This is a strong, full-bodied, and full-flavored cigar. The smoke time is two hours.

Would I buy this cigar again? No, A.J. Fernandez makes better cigars than this.

Categories: Nicaraguan cigars, 90, Tabacalera A.J. Fernandez, Dias de Gloria | Tags: , , , , , | 1 Comment

Stallone Castaño San Andres Robusto

Stallone Castaño San Andres Robusto. Up until a few months ago, we never heard about this brand. Only when Todd Vance joined Stallone Cigars the brand came on our radar. Vance is an industry veteran who spent time with A.J. Fernandez, Cornelius & Anthony, and Padilla Cigars before joining Stallone Cigars. And our first thought was “Sylvester has a cigar brand”? But this brand has got nothing to do with the movie star. It is the brand from an Italian American, Tony Barrios, who’s a rodeo champion. He loves his stallions, and the world for stallions in Italian is Stallone. But skeptic as we are, we suspect that the fact that Sylvester Stallone is a famous brother of the leaf did play a part in picking the name.

The Castaño San Andres is part of the Cowboy Series. It features a Mexican San Andres wrapper over Nicaraguan filler and binder. The cigars come from the small Tabacalera La Perla. The same factory as the Muestra de Tabac. And that’s another brand whom we suspect picked the name to rub shoulders with a well-known brand. But again, we suspect, we don’t know for sure. But let’s focus on this 5½x52 Robusto, one of the three sizes available. Our experience with the cigars coming from Tabacalera La Perla is positive, so we have high hopes.

The sun-grown San Andres wrapper from Mexico has a leather-look, dry leather. Like the face of an old cowboy or fisherman, who’s been beaten by the sun for decades. It gives the cigar character. The triple cap is a bit rough on the eyes as well. The copper and gray ring has the silhouette of a stallion and the name of Tony Barrios. The secondary ring is in the same style and color as the name of the cigar. The cigar feels evenly filled. The aroma is medium strong and quite dark. Like a forest in the early morning, when everything is still wet from the night.

The cold draw is a bit on the loose side and leaves a dry leathery flavor on the palate. The first puff is soil, coffee, and sourness. Strong coffee. But then the leather starts to shine, with citrus, oak, and pepper. Soon the cigar starts to mellow out a bit. With dry flavors, leather, and earth. But with citrus acidity and some sweetness. The citrus is becoming quite strong, with a nice sweetness to balance it out. Then the leather and pepper grow stronger while the citrus disappears. The mouthfeel is still dry. There is a nutty flavor in the retrohale. The second third starts with the nuttiness, dark spices, pepper, and hay. The cigar is a little rough, not smooth, or with a lot of nuances. But it does not bite or leave a tickle in the throat. Halfway there is a hint of chocolate behind the leather, pepper, soil, and oak. Hay and pepper are becoming the dominant flavors. There is still some nuttiness as well. The last part of the cigar is wood, leather, soil, and pepper.

The cigar produces a lot of smoke. Beautiful blue smoke. The draw is fine. The dense ash is light in color. The burn is straight. It is a medium to medium-full cigar. Both in body and flavor. The smoke time is two hours and twenty minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? I liked it but want to try a few other Stallone Cowboy Series first.

Categories: 90, Nicaraguan cigars, Stallone, Tabacalera La Perla | Tags: , , , , ,

Rocky Patel Quarter Century Robusto

Rocky Patel Quarter Century Robusto. And as the name suggests, it celebrates the 25th anniversary of Rocky Patel as a cigar manufacturer. In 1995, the 35-year-old entertainment lawyer set his first steps in the industry with Indian Tobac. Nobody would have imagined that twenty-five years later, the Rocky Patel brand would be so strong and one of the best-selling cigar brands in the world. The Indian-born Patel had no background in tobacco, and people were expecting him to fail.

But now, 25 years later, he’s a rockstar in the industry. And to celebrate Patel created the Quarter Century. With Nicaraguan filler that has been aging for a decade. A Honduran binder to bind it all together. And then a dark Mexican San Andres wrapper. After rolling, the cigars age at the factory in Nicaragua for an additional two years before being released on the market.

The dark wrapper looks a bit dry. But the color is great and there aren’t any ugly veins. The two rings match, red with light yellow lettering. The construction feels good. The head is a beautiful round shape with a perfect triple cap. The aroma is amazing, deep, strong, like standing in a barnyard early in the morning before the world comes back alive.


The cold draw is perfect. Dry in flavor, a bit earthy with hay. The first puff is coffee, dark roast. The cigar holds the coffee flavor but adds soil, leather, spices, and pepper. There is also a hint of extra dark chocolate. At the end of the first third, there’s also wood with some sort of nuttiness. The smoke is tickling the back of the throat. The rough edge is gone in the second third. There is a bit more red pepper. The cigar is more earthy now, but the coffee is still lingering in the background. The Maduro wrapper is also releasing its sweetness. The earthiness grows, with sweetness and spice on the tip of the tongue. The earthiness is the main flavor but in the end, a very strong pepper overpowers it.

The draw is great. The ash is light gray and reasonably firm. The burn is great. The smoke is good, thick enough, and enough volume. It is a full-body cigar, full of dark flavors as well. The smoke time is two hours.

Would I buy this cigar again? A fiver every now and then.

Categories: 91, Nicaraguan cigars, Rocky Patel, Tavicusa | Tags: , , , , ,

Acid 20 Robusto

Acid 20 Robusto. Just like a few days ago, a review of the ACID 20 Robusto. But the last Acid 20 was smoked safari style to avoid the artificial sweetness of the sweetened cap. That worked in a way, as the sweetness wasn’t stuck on the lips. But the cigar still wasn’t very nice. Let’s see of smoking the same cigar, but this time in the way the blenders intended will create a different experience.

The ACID 20 is a cigar that celebrates 20 years of Acid. It is a popular brand that took the United States by storm and made Drew Estate a serious player. Slowly ACID is becoming available in more countries and has an international following now. Some people love it, others loathe it. The cigar has a Mexican San Andres wrapper. The binder is Indonesian and the filler Nicaraguan.

The flat cap is nice to see. The almost chrome ring with the black 20 is nice. Only the foot band mentions the brand name and the line. The dark wrapper looks intimidating because of a vein on the face of the cigar. The aroma is strong. It’s floral like some shampoo or detergent, not natural. The construction feels great.

Just licking the cap before cutting leaves an artificial sweet flavor on the palate. With some spice. The cold draw confirms that these are the two flavors. The cold draw is fine though, but that artificial sweetness is so overpowering that it makes the experience a bit unpleasant. Once lit, the sweetness seems to tone down a bit but it remains prominent. There is an earthy flavor in the background. The sweetness isn’t as overpowering as in other Acid cigars we smoked. There is a floral flavor, some herbs, leather, and cedar. Smoking the cigar in the direction it’s intended creates a different experience. The second third starts quite mellow. A little bit of soil, a few herbs, some floral notes, and sweetness. There is some pepper but it is extremely mild. There is a lot of balance in the flavor. Unlike many infused or flavored cigars, where the artificial flavors overpower the natural flavors of tobacco. In the final third, there is more soil and a little more pepper. The floral and artificial sweetness remains. The end has some earthiness again.

The draw is fabulous as is the smoke. But the smoke is always great with Drew Estate cigars. The burn is great and the ash has a browning yellow color. It is not too firm. The cigar has way more balance if you smoke it this way instead of safari style. It is much more pleasing to the palate. The smoke time is two hours. This cigar medium in both body and flavor.

Would I buy this cigar again? I still don’t like the artificial sweetness.

Categories: 90, ACID, Gran Fabrica Drew Estate, Nicaraguan cigars | Tags: , , ,

Acid 20 Robusto Safari style

Acid 20 Robusto Safari style. I don’t review a lot of infused cigars. But when I do, I always spot one big issue that makes us dislike the cigar. That is the sweet cap, artificial sweetness. So for this ACID 20 Robusto review, I am doing something else. We will smoke this Safari style. That is something from the Drew Estate Cigar Safari, where you smoke a cigar from the wrong end. That should solve the issue with the sweet cap. To make it fair, I will also smoke one as the blenders intended and post that review as well.

The Acid 20 was released in 2019. And as the name suggests, it was to celebrate 20 years of the Acid brand. Acid is the best-selling premium cigar in the United States according to Drew Estate. The infused cigars are immensely popular, yet a lot of smokers of traditional cigars can’t stand the infusion. The Acid 20 is made at La Gran Fabrica Drew Estate with a Mexican San Andres wrapper. The wrapper has a sweet cap. The binder is Indonesian around Nicaraguan filler.

The cigar is square. Not just box-pressed but square. The black and silver ring pops. The cap is flat and it makes the cigar look more squarish. The wrapper is dark and oily. The construction feels great. The cigar has a strong aroma, cloves, flowers like hibiscus, none of it smells like a traditional cigar.

Since I am smoking it safari style, there isn’t much of a cold draw due to the cap. The cold draw is slightly sweet and flowery, like rosewater. The first puffs are dark roast coffee with aspartame and floral sweetness. Slowly some spice shows up in the flavors as well. The floral flavor makes the mouth feel dry. A muddy clay flavor shows up, yet still with a bit of sweetness and floral flavors. There’s a hint of chili pepper as well.

At the beginning of the second third, the cigar turns more into a traditional cigar. Pepper and soil, with a tiny hint of floral flavors. But the floral sweetness doesn’t taste artificial anymore. Some citrus sourness shows up as well, but still with pepper and soil. These flavors remain, although for a while there was a very faint vanilla flavor on the background. Even when you smoke a Drew Estate cigar safari style, the smoke is out of this world. The draw is good, and much to our surprise, the burn is good as well. We were afraid that smoking the cigar in the opposite direction would affect the burn negatively, but not at all. The ash is quite dark and frayed. The infusion isn’t that strong when you smoke the cigar safari style. But it still gives some artificial flavors that do not sit well with our palates. The cigar is medium in body, full in flavor. The smoke time is two hours and ten minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? If I do, I won’t smoke it safari style

Categories: 89, ACID, Gran Fabrica Drew Estate, Nicaraguan cigars | Tags: , , , ,

EPC Pledge Prequel

EPC Pledge Prequel. A little over a year ago, a new cigar from Ernesto Perez Carrillo hit the market. The EPC Pledge. It is part of the Perez-Carrillo series, a series where the generations before Ernesto Perez Carrillo jr are honored. The other cigars in the series are the critically acclaimed Encore and La Historia. “With each sample of the six different blends for Pledge I worked on, I asked myself, ‘Is this cigar worthy to follow La Historia and Encore?” said Perez-Carrillo in a press release. “And I was very pleased when I found the one.”

The cigar comes from Perez-Carrillo’s factory in the Dominican Republic, La Alianza. For the blend, the cigar industry legend uses a Connecticut-grown Habano wrapper over an Ecuadorian binder. The filler is all Nicaraguan. For now, there are only two vitolas available. Those are the Prequel, a 5×50 Robusto, and the 6×52 Sojourn. The prequel became the #1 cigar of Cigar Aficionado’s Top 25 of 2020.

Let’s start with the box, deep blue with a beautiful tattoo style print. But when you open the box up is when the magic happens. The cigars, one row of ten pieces, lay on blue fabric, creating a very luxurious presentation. The cigars come in cellophane with a ‘cigar aficionado cigar of the year 2020, rated 98’ sticker on the foot. The foot ring is gold color fabric. Then there are two blue rings. The top one has different types of blue, with gold and white while the secondary ring mentions Perez Carrillo in clear white letters. Just in looks and packaging, this cigar looks great. The wrapper is oily, and Colorado Maduro in color. The oil gives it a shine like it’s lacquered. The cigar itself is a soft box-pressed with a fairly round head. It is leathery to the touch, but without noticeable plugs. The aroma is strong. Chocolate, barnyard, and the smell of horses.

The cold draw is fine. There is a mild spicy hay flavor with cinnamon. The first puffs are leathery and earthy. Those flavors remain for a while, but with some dark roast coffee and dark chocolate as supporting flavors. The chocolate turns more into cocoa, with a dry mouthfeel. And it gets stronger as well. There is an earthy flavor in the retrohale. Slowly some spice and pepper show up as well. The cocoa remains with some toast and a little bit of natural sweetness. The flavors so far would pair well with a dark stout, such as Guinness. Halfway the cigar gets too strong to retrohale pleasantly. There is still cocoa, pepper is growing and there is some acidity. The flavors are mild creamy. There is also some cedar and a spicy flavor that comes close to smoked paprika. There is a caramel-like sweetness in the aftertaste with a strong pepper, almost like chili padi, or bird’s eye chili as it’s called in the United States. But the chili isn’t overpowering, the rest of the flavors, especially the cocoa and earthiness keep it in check. There is a mild peanut flavor as well. A little more sweetness and acidity, with creaminess. Cocoa is the dominant flavor from start to finish. The peanut flavor gains some strength. The end is that earthiness again, with cocoa, peanuts, and green herbs.

The draw is great. And the natural oils in the wrapper make this cigar very smoky. Thick white smoke. The burn is straight. The ash is medium in color. It isn’t very firm, this isn’t a cigar for a long ash contest. This cigar is full in both body and flavor, with an intense start. The palate is quite unusual and you can taste that this cigar is made with well-aged tobacco. The smoke time is two hours and forty-five minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? Yes. Honestly, I am not the biggest fan of EPC cigars, but this one is very enjoyable.

Categories: 92, Dominican cigars, EPC, Tabacalera La Alianza | Tags: , , , , ,

ADVentura The Royal Return King’s Gold Robusto

ADVentura The Royal Return King’s Gold Robusto, a cigar from ADV & McKay Cigars. ADV & McKay Cigars are Henderson Ventura and Marcel Knobel. They came up with a beautiful story of an adventurer, ADVentura, and his companion McKay who set sail to the new world in 1490. And with every release, another chapter of that story is written. The Royal Return is the 4th chapter.

The Royal Return is available in two blends, Queen’s Pearls, and King’s Gold. The King’s Gold comes in a Robusto and a Toro, this is a review of the 5×52 Robusto. It is made with a Connecticut Broadleaf wrapper from the United States. The binder comes from San Andres, Mexico. And the filler comes from the United States, Nicaragua, and the Dominican Republic. Tabacalera William Ventura is responsible for making the cigars. ADVentura is also a sponsor of the Project Piece of Heart charity.

The thick and dark Connecticut Broadleaf wrapper is oily, greasy almost. The backside is beautifully marbled due to a thin, but visible vein. The band is not a paper band but a metal alloy. It is rare, but not unique. The Norwegian brand Viking and Chinook Cellars Terroir use something similar. But it is rare, and it looks great. It’s like an old, weathered seal including patina. The construction feels good with a pretty flat head. The aroma is strong, wood and spices. It’s like walking on a souk, past one of those spice stalls.

The cold draw is fine. It leaves both a salty and a sweet flavor on the lips, with spice on the tongue. After lighting there is a bitter and salty taste, burned nuts. But that is gone after three puffs, leaving a nice muddy clay flavor with pepper behind. It’s quite a spicy start. But then it mellows out, the spices and pepper are still there, with coffee and caramel. But much milder, calmer. Like when you enter the safe and calm harbor during a storm. The mouthfeel is even a little creamy. The clay flavor is quite unique. At the end of the first third, the sweetness turns to honey. The second third starts with wood and spices. There are also some nuts. Halfway the flavors are sweet wood with spices and cream. Very interesting, smooth, and completely in balance. The final third sees the return of soil, with wood and lingering pepper. The cigar feels hot in the last third.

The draw is fine. The smoke is thick and plentiful. The burn had to be corrected once or twice, but that was no surprise with such a thick and oily wrapper. The thickness of the wrapper also makes it a slow-burning cigar, it lasts long. The ash is white as snow. This cigar has balance and plenty of evolution. The smoke time is two hours and forty-five minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? It is quite interesting so yes, and I want to explore more ADVentura

Categories: 92, ADVentura, Dominican cigars, Tabacalera William Ventura | Tags: , , ,

Stallone Alazán Corojo Robusto

Stallone Alazán Corojo Robusto. Up until a few months ago, Stallone Cigars was a company we never heard of. But then they hired Todd Vance as Vice President of Sales. And we got some samples of which we reviewed the Castano San Andres Robusto two months ago. Today we review the Alazan Corojo. Both are named after stallions, the big inspiration behind the brand. Owner Tony Barrios is a prize-winning rodeo cowboy.

The cigars come from Las Villas Cigars, previously known as Tabacalera La Perla. It is a small factory in Esteli, Nicaragua. The Stallone Alazán Corojo Robusto is a 5×54 box-pressed Robusto. It is made with a Brazilian Corojo wrapper. The binder comes from Ecuador with Nicaraguan filler.

The wrapper of this box-pressed cigar is beautiful. A nice reddish glow on the smooth and oily wrapper. There is a clean triple cap. The tiny veins are minor and do not take anything away from the aesthetics of the cigar. The ring is pretty. Gray with a stallion and metallic outlines and name. The secondary band has the same colors with the line name in red. The construction feels good. The aroma of the cigar fits with the theme, horses.

The cold draw is fantastic. It gives a herbal flavor. Once lit there is leather and coffee. It then changes to coffee with dark spices. The mouthfeel is a bit dry. The flavor then changes to cedar with spices and herbs. At the end of the first third, there is some pepper and sweetness as well. The second third starts with pepper, dark spices, leather, and soil. It slowly evolves to wood, grass, pepper, spices, and leather. Pepper is growing, black pepper. The mouthfeel stays dry, with a bit of a rough edge. But not unpleasant rough. Wood is getting stronger. The final third has way more pepper and an unusual mushroom flavor. The finale has wood, herbs, pepper, and mushroom.

The draw is great. The ash is light in color, dense, and firm. The burn is good. The smoke is thick, plenty in volume, and white as can be. There is a good balance. This cigar is medium to full in strength, medium in flavor. With Brazilian tobacco, there was an expectation of more sweetness. And with Corojo, there was an expectation of nuts. But those flavors weren’t really there. The smoke time is two hours and a half.

Would I buy this cigar again? Yes, I like it.

Categories: 90, Nicaraguan cigars, Stallone, Tabacalera La Perla | Tags: , , , ,

Kristoff Shade Grown Robusto

Kristoff Shade Grown Robusto. This blend was released in 2019 but there are rumors that it’s actually an old blend that made a return under a new name. Yet those rumors are unconfirmed and thus I won’t say that it is the same cigar unlike one of the largest cigar retailers in the USA. Their website claims “This cigar has received a packaging & name update. Previously known as Brittania Reserva, the Shade Grown is the same exact blend under a new name.”

The blend consists of a Honduran Connecticut Shade wrapper. The binder is Cuban seed tobacco from the Dominican Republic. The filler is all Cuban seed, from both Nicaragua and the Dominican Republic. The robusto measures 5½x54 and it’s made at the Von Eicken Cigar Factory in the Dominican Republic. The factory is better known under the previous name: Charles Fairmorn.

The cigar starts off with bonus points for looks. It doesn’t get any better than with a pigtail and a closed foot in my book. This cigar has both. Add a simple yet sophisticated band and you’re halfway there. That the velvet-like smooth wrapper isn’t very oily and a bit pale in color doesn’t even matter anymore. The wrapper is not very light in color for a Connecticut Shade wrapper though. The cigar feels well constructed. The aroma is mild and quite woody.

The cold draw is fine, yet quite flavorless. The first five minutes of smoking give a mild flavor. The typical mustiness of Connecticut Shade, much like old books, with some sweetness. But it is Honduran Connecticut, and that means that the mustiness isn’t as distinct and strong as with Ecuadorian of Connecticut grown Connecticut Shade. After a third, some young wood shows up, with some spice, and leather. But the musty Connecticut flavor is still around. The retrohale gives a bit of a nutmeg and cinnamon flavor. There is a herbal spice noticeable on the back of the tongue. Halfway a hazelnut flavor shows up. Which is a pleasant change of pace, but not unexpected. Honduran Connecticut Shade often has a nutty flavor as well. The sweetness gets stronger. In the final third, there is a spicy yet sweet cedar flavor with a tangy acidity.

The draw is flawless. The ash is quite dark and the burn had to be corrected a few times. The smoke is fine. When it comes to construction, there are no complaints. Yet this is a cigar mild to medium in body and mild to medium in flavor. The classic Connecticut Shade mustiness is the dominant flavor and if you don’t like that, this is not your cigar. The smoke time is two hours.

Would I buy this cigar again? No. There are plenty of Kristoff cigars that I love but this isn’t one of them.

Categories: 88, Charles Fairmorn, Dominican cigars, Kristoff | Tags: , , , ,

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