Posts Tagged With: toro

Antigua Esteli Segovia Maduro Toro.

Antigua Esteli Segovia Maduro Toro. The first time we ever saw or heard the brand was on social media. At first, we figured it would be one of those private labels again that try to make a few bucks before disappearing into the swamp. The swamp where many other small private labels have been buried over the years. But the more we looked into Antigua Esteli, the more we were intrigued. And the more we wanted to try one of those cigars. We connected with owner and founder Art Garcia and learned more about the brand. It’s more than just a simple private label. Garcia runs his own crew at the factory, his rollers, blenders and buys the tobacco himself. In September we finally met at the Intertabac trade show and weaseled a few cigars so we could finally smoke them


We scored the Antigua Esteli Segovia Maduro Toro. That’s a 6×56 cigar, made in Nicaragua. The fillers and binder are all Nicaraguan. The tobacco comes from four different regions in Nicaragua. The wrapper comes from the San Andres region in Mexico. The shape is unusual, it’s not fully box-pressed, it’s not round but it’s semi box-pressed.


The cigar looks beautiful. An evenly dark, smooth and oily wrapper. Great shape with a triple cap. The cigar feels well constructed. The ring is detailed, with tobacco fields, the logo. And both the American and Nicaraguan flags in a banner combining the two countries. The secondary ring says Segovias Maduro. The aroma is strong, barnyard, wood, and forest come to mind.


The cold draw is easy, and it leaves a peppery flavor on the lips. A tingling sensation. Add a raw tobacco flavor to it, and that’s what the cold draw tastes like. Once lit, there is a mix of coffee, leather, soil, spices, and pepper. The bitterness of the coffee is a nice contrast with the creaminess of the mouthfeel. Soon it’s more coffee with leather and spices. There’s also a bit of citrus, and the mouthfeel remains creamy. After a third, it’s a toasty coffee flavor with wood, spices, and pepper. Still creamy though. The creaminess makes the flavors feel silky smooth. The final third starts with ice cream without the numbing cold of ice cream. Vanilla sweetness, cream, and roasted coffee beans. Then the coffee returns, with way more pepper than before.


The draw is great, and the burn is straight as an arrow. The ash is white, but a bit brittle. The cigar produces a lot of smoke. The flavors are all smooth, round, and soft. Yet medium to medium-full in flavors, and medium in strength. The smoke time is two hours and thirty minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? Yes I will
number91

Categories: 91, Antigua Esteli, Nicaraguan cigars | Tags: , , , , , | Leave a comment

Siempre Sun Grown Toro

Siempre Sun Grown Toro. Earlier this year, I was approached by one of our contacts who’s working for a European cigar distributor. His question was if I ever heard of Dapper Cigar Company. And honestly, the answer was no. So I googled them, and the brand sparked my interest. They provide a lot of information about the blends on their website. As cigar media, that’s something we love. That cigar distributor decided not to take on Dapper Cigar Company. But another distributor in The Netherlands did, Kelch Trading introduced Dapper Cigars on the Dutch market.


The Siempre Sun Grown Toro sports a Sun Grown Sumatra wrapper from Ecuador. The binder is Connecticut Broadleaf from the United States. The filler comes from Honduras and three regions of Nicaragua. Those are Ometepe, Jalapa, and Esteli. On the website, Dapper Cigar Company even discloses the growers of the wrappers and some of the farms where the wrappers are grown. That kind of information is often hard to, or impossible, to find. The Siempre Sun Grown line was introduced in 2016.


The cigar looks great. The toothy wrapper is dark and oily. The triple cap is flawless. And the orange and gold ring just pops from that dark background. The cigar feels well constructed, we couldn’t find any plugs or soft spots on the touch. The aroma of the cigar is like charred wood and farmyard.


The cold draw is great. The flavors are meaty and earthy before the cigar is lit, with pepper on the tongue. Once lit, the cigar is earthy, spicy, and sweet. Add in some coffee, and that’s the flavor profile in the first puffs. The earthiness and pepper are the main flavors. And the flavors are meaty in mouthfeel. Slowly some spices and dry wood show up too. The pepper mellows out a little bit. Then suddenly it’s espresso with pepper and some citrus acidity. The pepper gets a bit stronger after a third, with a thick, creamy mouthfeel. There’s pepper, spices, wood, coffee, and earthiness. The pepper has a little bite every now and then. After two thirds, a leathery, peppery, cocoa flavor shows up as well. The cigar picks up in strength, power, and pepper. Then the coffee flavor returns as well.


The draw is good. The ash is a little dark though. The burn was alright, although it needed a touch up now and then. The smoke is medium thick and full. This cigar is balanced, although sometimes the pepper has a little bite. The cigar is medium to medium-full bodied and flavored. The smoke time is three hours

Would I buy this cigar again? Yes I liked it. It matched my profile.

number90

Categories: 90, Dapper Cigars, Nicaraguan cigars | Tags: , , , ,

Arturo Fuente Opus X 20th anniversary Father & Son

Arturo Fuente Opus X 20th anniversary Father & Son. In 1995, Arturo Fuente released a new cigar. The Arturo Fuente Opus X. It was a prestigious project for the Fuente family. Against all odds, they grew wrapper in the Dominican Republic. Where everybody said it couldn’t be done, Fuente did it. They grew Habano seed tobaccos under a cloth and created a rich and beautiful wrapper. The Opus X was the first premium Dominican puro. It became a highly sought after cigar, available in limited quantities. And now, 25 years later, that is still the case.

In 2015, Carlito Fuente released his tribute to the original Fuente Fuente Opus X. He said he wanted to blend something that made his grandfather and father proud. Something that brought him to his childhood, something that made him happy. And that was the 20th Anniversary. Available in four different vitolas. A 61/2×52 Figurado with the name God’s whisper is the most prolific. But there’s a torpedo as well, 6⅜x52, with the name power of the dream. Then there’s a 5¾x52 Robusto called Believe. And the fourth cigars is the one being reviewed. The 6¼x49 Father & Son.

The cigar has a Colorado Claro colored wrapper, hidden from the eye with a piece of cedar. Once removed, the wrapper is clear, smooth, yet it looks a bit dry. The aroma is quite mild, sawdust and wood. The cigar feels good, well packed and evenly packed. The shape and cap are perfect. And then the ring. The classic Opus X ring in blue instead of red. A secondary ring in the same colors, on the same high-quality paper, says 20 years. 100 out of 100 points for the ring. The foot of the cigar clearly shows different tobaccos, with different colors.


The cold draw is just perfect. Mild spicy with some sweetness in the flavors. After lighting, a very balanced and smooth mixture of spice, coffee, and sweetness is tasted. The flavors then turn wood, with spices, and leather. There’s also some faint vanilla and grass. All smooth flavors, balanced, like an aged cigar. After a centimeter, a nice fresh lemon flavor binds everything together. The sweetness is molasses, and it’s getting a bit stronger. The mouthfeel is creamy, buttery. The spice and pepper get some strength after a while. The main flavors turn to wood and sweetness, but the sweetness is different than the molasses tasted earlier. After a third, the cigar gets meatier in mouthfeel, with wood and vanilla as main flavors. Halfway the coffee returns, with gingerbread spices and vanilla. The flavors remain smooth and balanced all the way through the cigar. The strength does pick up in the final third though.

The draw is great. The smoke is good too, not spectacular but good. The light-colored ash is firm and dense. The burn is sharp. The cigar is very smooth and balanced. Medium-bodied, medium-full flavored without any harshness at all. The smoke time is three hours, fifteen minutes. Nubbed it till my fingers and lips burned.

Would I buy this cigar again? Yes, even with this price, I want to smoke it on special occasions
number94

Categories: 94, Arturo Fuente, Dominican cigars, Tabacalera A. Fuente y Cia | Tags: , , , , ,

Kafie 1901 San Andres Toro

 

This is one of the four Kafie 1901 lines that are in existence right now. The other ones are the Kafie 1901 Sumatra, Connecticut, and Don Fernando Maduro. This cigar is blended with tobacco from five countries. The filler has tobacco from Brazil, Nicaragua and the Dominican Republic. The binder comes from Honduras. The wrapper is Mexican San Andres. The line comes in several sizes but for this review, I smoked a 6×54 Toro.

 

Kafie Cigars is the dream of Dr. Gaby Kafie. He gave up his career as a medical professional to pursue his dream and passion of being a cigar maker. And a coffee producer. He now has his own brands, his own factory and with his business partner, he also has a box factory. And a cellophane producing plant, all in Honduras. The only thing lacking is a tobacco growing operation, but Gaby Kafie isn’t pursuing that at the moment. Recently he changed the name of the factory from Tabacalera Kafie y Cia to Tabacalera La Union

 

The dark wrapper does have some color differences. And the wrapper at the head seems a bit folded up. But the cigar still looks good, quite intimidating due to the dark wrapper. The wrapper itself isn’t oily, rather dry. The thin veins combined with the color make it look like a mean cigar. The red, almost burgundy, and silver ring is nice. The cigar feels well constructed. The aroma is medium strong, it is leathery with sawdust.

 

The cold draw is a bit easy with a raw tobacco and leather flavor. The first puffs are interesting. Spices like nutmeg, pepper but also coffee. And with a natural sweetness from the Mata Fina tobacco. After a while, leather, wood, and grassy flavors show up too. The flavors remain with the spices, pepper, and leather. Halfway it’s still cinnamon, nutmeg, leather but not also coffee, pepper, and some sweetness. In the final third, the cigar becomes more grassy with wood. The pepper is still there.

The draw is great. The smoke is thick and white. The burn needed to be corrected though. Just once, in the beginning. The cigar is medium-full bodied and flavored. The smoke time is two hours ten minutes

Would I buy this cigar again? Yeah, I would. Because it’s unique in flavor.

number89

Categories: 89, Honduran cigars, Kafie, Tabacalera La Union | Tags: , , , ,

VegaFino Exclusivo Benelux 2018

VegaFina is a brand made at Casa de Garcia on the Dominican Republic. And Casa de Garcia is the largest cigar factory in the country. It’s part of Altadis. And Altadis is part of Imperial Brands. But for how long is the question. Imperial Brands is trying to sell their premium cigar division. That includes their Dominican cigar factory but also their stake in Habanos. And the shares in several Habanos distributors worldwide.


Habanos was probably the inspiration for this Exclusivo Benelux. Habanos has been releasing regional editions for over a decade. This is the first time VegaFina released a regional edition for the Benelux. Probably hoping to mimic the success of the Cuban regional editions. For that, they blended a 6×56 cigar. The filler is from the Dominican and the United States. The binder is from the Dominican. As a wrapper, they used Mexican Criollo.

The cigar has a nice Colorado Claro colored wrapper. The veins are thin and pretty. Where the regular VegaFina ring has a brushed silver color, the designers picked a shiny silver for the secondary ring. That makes the rings look odd. The Benelux flag design is a nice addition to the additional ring. The construction feels good. The aroma is mild, with a wooden nose. The secondary ring is not glued straight, it’s not correct on the detail level.

The cold draw is good. It tastes spicy with a strong raw tobacco flavor. Stronger than expected from a brand that is known for milder cigars. After lighting, I taste a very mild nutty flavor with some citrus. The flavors are very mild. Coffee, leather, citrus and some sweetness. The cigar is boring with little flavor and no evolution in the first third. After a third, I taste some pepper, wood and a hint of chocolate. And there is still a little acidity left. It then picks up in strength a little, with young, fresh wood and some sugar. But it remains mild. Halfway the cigar turns medium bodied with wood, nuts, minty freshness, and pepper. The wood turns a little charred. In the final third, leather makes a comeback.

The burn was crooked but corrected itself. The ash is whiter than white. The smoke is poor, in volume and thickness. The cigar starts very mildly, then slowly grows to medium-full. Both in flavor and strength. The smoke time is two hours and fifty minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? Nope

number87

Categories: 87, Casa de Garcia, Dominican cigars, VegaFina | Tags: , , ,

Revolution Toro

As I mentioned in the previous two Revolution reviews, this cigar was part of a sampler with three sizes. I smoked the short robusto and the robusto previously. And they were night and day, even though both scored low with a 79 and an 82 score. Today, I’ll be reviewing the toro. And hopefully the progress continues, but my expectations are low.

If it wasn’t for the mixture of Nicaraguan and Mexican tobaccos in the filler, this cigar would have been a Mexican puro. The binder and wrapper are from Mexico. And the cigars are made at the Nueva Matacapan de Tobacos from A. Turrent.


The wrapper is extremely rough and that combined with the simple ring makes it an unappealing cigar. The construction feels good though and the aroma is strong, very strong. Barnyard, farm animals and swamp is what I smell.

The cold draw is great. I taste a little wood, some pepper, and tobacco. After lighting, I taste wood with cinnamon and leather. The cinnamon is quite nice, but there’s an overall flavor that makes that the cinnamon doesn’t shine. A little stale harshness. After a centimeter, I taste cinnamon with leather, sweetness and a little salt. The sweetness has some vanilla notes in it. I taste also some grass and a hint of chocolate. The salt gets a little stronger. The final third starts with a nice, sweet, coffee flavor with some green herbs and pepper. The cinnamon returns with earthy flavors and wood.

The draw is fantastic. The firm ash is white. The smoke is okay. The burn is good. This is a medium bodied, medium flavored cigar. The smoke time is an hour and fifty minutes

Would I buy this cigar again? Nope, no, njet, nee, nein.

number82

Categories: 82, Mexican cigars, Nueva Matacapan de Tabacos, Revolution | Tags: , , ,

Tambo Churchill

Indonesia has a long tobacco history. But most of the tobacco is used for dry-cured shortfillers. Premium cigars are scarce, yet there are a few brands out there. Tambo is one of them, and this was given to me by the Indonesian Tambo distributor when I met him in Malaysia for the CSWC Qualifier in Kuala Lumpur.


There are two sizes available, a 6×50 Toro with the name Churchill and/or Super Robusto and a corona with the name short corona.

The unique feature of this cigar is Tambolaka tobacco. That is Indonesian tobacco, and after drying it is rolled up tightly in ten feet poles. Those poles are then bound together tightly with rope so the tobacco can age. They age up to five years before being cut. Most of it is used as pipe tobacco, but some end up in cigars like Tambo.

The wrapper is amazing. Smooth, a beautiful color brown, smooth veins. If someone would have told me that this is high-grade HTL I would believe it. The cigar comes with a small pigtail. The construction feels good. The ring is a bit simple though, but it provides all the necessary information. The aroma is strong. I smell hay and straw. 

When I wet the cap to cut the cigar, I notice how salt the wrapper is.

The cold draw is great. The cigar is salty yet sweet. After lighting, I taste bitter coffee with sugar. Quickly the flavors change to leather, pine, soil and a little bit of pepper. Slowly some creamy chocolate shows up. After a third, I taste come citrus acidity as well, faint but still. The salt, pepper, and chocolate remain the main flavors, with some wood, tobacco, and leather on the background. Some nutty flavor shows up, with the lingering chocolate. I taste some hay too, while the salt loses some of its strength. The mouthfeel is a little dusty. The salt fades way even more in the final third. And secretly, the strength has grown from mild to medium in the beginning, to medium-full where I am now. Tambolaka tobacco is known for its strength, to that could be the reason.

The burn is great. The ash is white, firm and like a stack of coins. There is enough smoke, which is light blue to white. This cigar starts mild to medium but grows to medium-full. Both in strength and in flavor. The smoke time is two hours and twenty minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? Yes, not a box, but a fiver for sure.

number90

Categories: 90, Indonesian cigars, Tambo | Tags: , , ,

Oliva Baptiste Toro

A friend gave me this cigar and said: “I think you will like this one”. He knows that I love Oliva cigars. And I had never heard of this one before, even though at my previous job we distributed the brand. And we were warehousing Oliva for all international accounts. Plus I’ve been to the factory twice. So my curiosity was sparked.

The cigar is made exclusively for Famous Smoke Shop. It’s a Nicaraguan filler, Nicaraguan binder, and Ecuador Habano wrapper cigar. The cigar is in between box-pressed and oval. The one that I smoked is a 5½x54 Toro and they are dirt cheap. If you buy them by the box, you only pay 4 USD per cigar, for a premium, hand-made stick and that’s a bundle price yet they come in boxes.

The wrapper is dark, a bit rustic with one big vein on the bottom front. The backside of the ring reminds me of the Oliva series V. The shape of the front too, but red instead of brown. The aroma has burned notes, charred woods with something floral. The shape is in between oval and box pressed. The construction feels good.

The cold draw is perfect with raw tobacco as the flavor. After lighting, I taste sweet coffee, strong though. There’s also soil and pepper. Soon a faint leather shows up too, with a minty freshness. After a few puffs, I taste roasted nuts, caramel, cinnamon, spicy green herbs, and some pepper. The leather lingers around on the background. After a third, I taste sweet grass with some leather and citrus. The caramel sweetness is the dominant flavor, very pleasant, smooth with some spice coming from green herbs and pepper on the background. The flavors are well balanced. I get some toast too. The flavors are mild creamy with a hint of vanilla. There’s a little bitterness on the tip of my tongue. Halfway I taste some oak, with pepper, roasted nuts, coffee beans, and caramel. The flavors slowly change to a more spice based flavor. Nutmeg, cinnamon, cumin with a little minty freshness. There’s also a little earthy flavor with some oak. The sweetness has disappeared, the pepper turned to white pepper. The cigar has a little oak, leather, pepper, sweetness, spices, nuts, coffee. So many flavors, all balanced and smooth.

This is a cigar that I could smoke every single day, over and over again.

The draw is great. The ash is quite dark and not firm. The burn is pretty straight. This is a medium bodied, full flavored cigar. It just fits my flavor preferences like a glove. With a better-looking wrapper and a better burn, I could have scored a 95. I thoroughly enjoyed it for exactly two hours.

Would I buy this cigar again? I ordered a box before I was done typing this review.

number92

Categories: 92, Nicaraguan cigars, Oliva, Tabacalera Oliva | Tags: , , , ,

Merciless Toro by JdN

Up until recently, I had never heard of this cigar even though I’m a fan of Joya de Nicaragua. I had never heard of it because it’s a house blend for the American based online retailer Famous Smoke. But I ran into them when I was browsing the website of Malaysian retailer Borneo Cigars. I was placing an order anyway, so I added these.

The cigars utilize Nicaraguan fillers with a Dominican binder and Ecuadorian Habano wrapper. The only vitola Borneo Cigars was selling was the 6×50 Toro. The price was really good, around 5 euro per cigar, so I decided to pull the trigger and get myself a few. I mean, I was placing an order anyway so why not add a few from one of my favorite factories?

The wrapper is dark, rough and intimidating. With the reputation of Joya de Nicaragua producing strong cigars, the name, and the looks, this cigar is intended to strike fear. The wrapper feels like fine leather. The construction is flawless and the ring is gorgeous. Black with silver and a popping red. The aroma is strong, manure is what I smell.

The cold draw is fine, with a spicy and dry raw tobacco and raisin flavor. Right from the start, I taste dry leather with coffee. I also taste mushrooms and oak. After a few puffs, the cigar gets more of a soil and cedar flavor, with a little salt. The mouthfeel is dry. The cigar leans very much to the wood, earth, and vegetal spectrum of the flavor wheel. After a centimeter, I taste some nutmeg and cumin, with some milk chocolate sweetness. I also get some metallic flavors. The milk chocolate gets stronger and finally, I taste some pepper too. After a third, I taste some toast with roasted almonds and sugar. The pepper is still there. The second third starts sweeter, but it’s aspartame sweetness. I also taste some citrus. Halfway the cigar is earthy, woody with milk chocolate and citrus. The cigar has some butter creaminess to it now. In the final third, the chocolate is getting stronger supported by some leather. The mouthfeel is creamy yet dry. In the final puffs, I taste some thin mints too.


The draw is great, the ash is like a stack of coins. Firm and dense. The smoke is decent, could be a bit thicker. I would call this cigar medium-full bodied and flavored. The smoke time is two hours and forty minutes

Would I buy this cigar again? Yes, I want more

number90

Categories: 90, Fabrica de Tabacos Joya de Nicaragua, Merciless, Nicaraguan cigars | Tags: , , ,

Maria Mancini 2017 Toro Lindo

For over twenty years, the German manufacturer Schuster Cigars has the Maria Mancini cigars made in Honduras. And for the last couple of years, there’s a limited edition. For 2017, the company went for a 6×52 Toro Lindo. And I had the chance to try this 8 euro cigar for free, the only condition was that I had to review it. Good deal ain’t it?


The tobacco used in the filler is Nicaraguan, Honduran and Brazilian. Add a Honduran wrapper and binder, and there’s your Maria Mancini 2017 Toro Lindo. I smoked the Maria Mancini 2016 limited edition and that was a pretty decent cigar, so if this one is in the same range it should be an enjoyable smoke.

The cigar doesn’t look too good, to be honest. The cap comes in a darker shade than the wrapper and the final cap is glued to the cigar in a sloppy way. The ring is dated and the foot ring is too simple too. The rings don’t match with each other either. A professional designer could and should have done a better job. Updating the rings and logo would be something that will bring the looks of the cigar to a higher level. The wrapper looks a bit leathery, it feels leathery and greasy. Oily might be a better description. The construction feels good. The strength of the aroma is medium. I smell a little ammonia and barnyard aromas.


The cold draw is good. I taste dry tobacco, mildly peppery, with some raisin sweetness. At first, I taste leather and mud. After a few puffs, I taste some green herbs, mushroom, grass and a metallic flavor. Some chocolate shows up too, with a growing pepper flavor. I also get faint vanilla. The cigar has an ashy aftertaste, with red pepper. After an inch, I taste soil with a little spice and sugar water. After a third, I taste soil, green herbs but now with something that comes close to Nutella, but more of a cheap knock-off store brand. There’s also a little grass. Halfway the cigar turns a little sweeter, still with pepper and earthy flavors though. The cigar remains peppery, earthy and sweet but now has some grassy flavors too. With about an inch and a half left, pepper is the main flavor, but supported by the sweetness and still the earthiness. There’s also a coffee bean flavor. Even closer to the end, the coffee beans turn into a high quality 80% dark chocolate.


The sloppy cap comes off after the first puffs, first creating false air before I removed it completely. The draw is great, just as the burn and the firm, light-colored ash. The cigar is medium flavored, medium to full-bodied. 

The smoke time is two hours and forty minutes

Would I buy this cigar again? No, too earthy for me.

number87

Categories: 87, Honduran cigars, Maria Manchini | Tags: , , ,

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