Posts Tagged With: toro

Don Chico Ecuador Toro

Don Chico Ecuador Toro. Or Don Chico Habano Toro as the cigar is called on the American market. But due to copyright legislation, non-Cuban cigar companies are not allowed to use Habano in their name outside the USA. Where most brands change Habano in Sun Grown, Barreda chose to replace it with Ecuador for their Don Chico line. The Don Chico line is a tribute to the 1st generation Barreda in the tobacco industry, Francisco Barreda. And the 3rd generation named this line in his honor. The line is also available in a Maduro version.


Ecuador on the secondary ring comes from the country where the Habano wrapper is grown, Ecuador. The binder comes from the South East Asian country of Indonesia. The filler comes from Nicaragua. The Barreda factory is located in Esteli and was founded in 2013. This 6×52 Toro is one of the three sizes available. The others are a 5×50 Robusto and a 6×60 Chairman. Stephanie Huete, sales & marketing manager for Barreda cigars, gave us a sample at the Intertabac trade show.

The cigar looks good. A Colorado to Colorado Maduro colored wrapper, smooth and oily. With a cloth foot ring, and two rings. The top ring is beige with brown and shows a drawing of Don Chico. The secondary ring just says Ecuador. The ring colors match the foot ring, and even though they look simple, it actually works for this cigar. That’s because the colors are well chosen. The shape of the cigar is flawless. And the aroma is strong. Barnyard with a strong cocoa powder smell. The cigar feels well constructed.


The cold draw is a bit tight. It’s sweet, cane sugar and sultanas. After lighting, the cigar gives coffee, leather, hay, and a pinch of salt. The mouthfeel is thick, like butter. The cigar gets more sweetness, more leather. The total lack of pepper is surprising in the first inch, but then it shows up, smooth yet pronounced. The cigar turns to cedar with sweetness. To balance it out, there’s a nice citrus acidity. The cigar gets more wood and leather. In the final third, the cigar gets peppery.


The draw is a bit tight, it feels like the smoke is a bit greasy. The burn is nice and straight tough. And the ash is very light, almost white. The smoke is decent, in thickness and volume. The cigar is medium-full bodied, medium-full flavored. The smoke time is three hours and twenty minutes.

Would I buy these cigars again? Occasionally

number91
Categories: 91, Don Chico, Nicaraguan cigars | Tags: , , , , | Leave a comment

Davidoff Year of the Rat

Davidoff Year of the Rat. Of all those cigars using the Chinese Zodiac calendar, Davidoff is the original one. It is the Swiss brand that decided to release a limited edition for each of the Chinese zodiac years. And due to the success, other companies followed. Even the king of limited and region editions, Habanos, followed suit. But the most anticipated release every year is the Davidoff year of cigar.


For the year of the rat, the Davidoff blenders went with an Ecuadorian Habano wrapper. Dark, oily and beautiful. They wrapped that around a Semilla B binder from Nicaragua. For the fillers, the blenders selected viso tobacco from Esteli and Condega in Nicaragua. And blended that with viso and second from the Dominican republic into a 6×52 sized toro.

The cigar looks fantastic. The dark, Maduro colored, Habano wrapper is mouth-watering. Beautifully colored, oily with a few veins. The shape is perfect, just like the cap. And the dark, oily wrapper is a beautiful backdrop for the glossy white, and classic, Davidoff ring. The secondary ring is red with gold and tells you it’s the cigar for the year of the rat. The barnyard aroma is quite strong. The cigar feels well constructed.


The cold draw is great, with flavors of pepper, the bitterness of dark chocolate, raw tobacco and leather. Immediately after lighting, the bitterness of dark chocolate is there. Complexed bitterness. With mushrooms, leather, and pepper. The mouthfeel is dry. The nice bitterness of the dark chocolate remains, but now with sweetness, ginger and mushrooms. The aftertaste is a nice mellow pepper. The dark chocolate becomes even more pronounced, with pepper on the background. Other flavors are leather, mushrooms, hay, and pepper. Later on, the cigar has oak, pepper, ginger, and leather. The second third starts with coffee, hazelnuts, pepper, and a grassy flavor. There is also oak and leather in the second third. The final third has oak, coffee, pepper. The mouthfeel is a little creamy. The cigar then turns to leather, oak, and pepper.


The draw is great. The ash is light gray and looks like a stack of dimes. The smoke is good, not super thick but still thick enough. And the volume is nice too. The cigar is balanced but has character. This is a full-bodied, full-flavored cigar. The smoke time is three hours. The burn is good as well.

Would I buy this cigar again? It’s expensive, but I enjoyed it

number91

Categories: 91, Cigars Davidoff, Davidoff, Dominican cigars | Tags: , , , ,

Talu Signature Toro

Talu Signature Toro. Indonesia has a long history of tobacco. And a long history in cigars, yet not in premium handmade longfillers. Most of the cigars hailing from the South East Asian country are machine-made dry-cured shortfillers. And of the cigar tobacco that’s being imported, most is used for those machine-made cigars as well. These kinds of cigars are extremely popular in Western Europe. But there are a few premium handmade longfillers from Indonesia, and the number of brands seems to be growing. Most are produced in Yogyakarta, at Taru Martani.


Taru Martani translates to the leaf that gives joy to life. The name was given to the factory by the Sultan of Yogyakarta after the independence war with The Netherlands. In the past, the factory produced roll your own tobacco as well. We are not sure if that is still the case. But we do know that there are several Indonesian premium cigar brands made at the factory.

The cigar has a typical Indonesian wrapper. The look and feel are slightly different than its Caribbean cousins. It feels a little more sandy, and the color is a shade that you won’t find anywhere else. The cigar is finished with a pigtail. The ring is beautiful. White, gray and copper. The logo and the brand name are clear. Nothing bad to say about the looks of this cigar. The construction feels good. And the aroma is different too, sawdust and lovage are what comes to mind. Medium-strong.


Just twisting off the pigtail is enough to create a good draw. The cold draw tastes dry, dusty with wood. Sawdust is a good description. Once lit, there is a lot of earthiness with some black coffee and spices. After a few puffs, a heavy, thick old leather flavor shows up. There is some pepper too. But the flavors aren’t balanced and taste charred, burned. The pepper and leather are the strongest flavors of the bunch. The burnt flavor fades away, instead, the cigar now tastes like leather, coffee, pepper, and sweetness. Somewhat later, the cigar turns to toast, leather, wood, pepper, all with a hint of sweetness and hay. In the second third, the cigar turns more to dried leaves with spices, pepper, and sweetness. That mixture continues to last into the final third. But then some hay and milk chocolate join the leaves, spices, and pepper. That’s what lasts until the end.


The draw is great. The ash is white as can be, dense and firm. The smoke is decent. Not very thick, but still sufficient to be pleasant. The burn is pretty straight. The Tambolaka tobacco boosts the strength of the cigar to medium. Flavors are medium too. This is a rare cigar, only a very limited number of boxes were made. It’s nice to have had the chance to smoke it, but our palate is so accustomed to the Caribbean tobacco that this is not a cigar for us. The smoke time is two hours.

Would I buy this cigar again? Nope!
number88

Categories: 88, Indonesian cigars, Talu | Tags: , , ,

Dondurma Toro

Dondurma Toro. If you haven’t heard of this cigar, that’s all right. This is a limited edition cigar that Dunbarton Tobacco & Trust made for one specific shop. That shop is Secreto Cigar Bar in Ferndale Michigan. However, we got the cigar in Amsterdam during the launch of the Sin Compromiso El Amsterdammer (see the review here). And we loved it so much, that we requested another one to do this review. And there were only 90 boxes of 10 available. Now, we don’t know a lot about this cigar. All we found was this information on the forums of cigarweekly.com, written by Steve Saka himself.

 

Dondurma is a Liga I created back in 2015 – it features what today has become relative rare tobacco in handmade cigars, a variation of Wisconsin Comstock. I tabled the Liga because IMO while it was solid, it really is only extra special when you retrohale it and then it is magnificent. But there is no way I am ever going to get Retailers to explain this, heck I can’t get them to explain Umbagog correctly… anyhow I made about 1,000 of these cigars. I promised Cigaragua 60 of these for our event this week. After that, I just sent a few to Ronnie Haisha of Secreto Cigar Bar a few to sample because he is a retrohaling fiend. Turns out he loved them and asked if he could sell the rest to his customers and I figured heck if anyone can represent or explain this cigar to folks it is him. There are only about 90 10ct boxes – I will be in Detroit at the end of the month to drink The Balvenie US and smoke Dondurma. I can make more, but it will always be in tiny batches like this, I simply do not have enough Comstock, nor do I plan on ever having a lot of Comstock.

The cigar looks fantastic. A dark, Colorado Maduro colored wrapper with some veins. There are also some sparkles from the minerals in the wrapper. And a dark gray ring, and popping golden letters. A nice little pigtail finishes the looks. The wrapper feels very silky. The box pressing gives the cigar a slender look. The cigar feels well constructed. The aroma is strong, it’s the classic barnyard aroma that belongs with cigars.

 

The cold draw is great. Flavors of raw tobacco, powdered sugar and raising come to mind. After lighting it’s a mixture of toast, coffee, nuts, spice, and sweetness. It evolves to spicy leather, and soil, while the coffee and nut flavors disappear. Slowly there’s a sweetness and creaminess appearing. And with that combination, the name Dondurma (Turkish for ice cream) makes sense. Both Steve Saka and Ronnie Haisha (from Secreto Cigar Bar) mentioned that this cigar is perfect for the retrohale. And they are right. The retrohale isn’t aggressive, as it often is, but brings a new dimension to the cigar. In the retrohale, the toast and nuts flavor return but it also enhance the ice cream reference. The main flavors are that creamy sweetness, supported by oak, leather, and soil. After a third, the cigar gets more of a chewy, yet creamy mouthfeel. Still with the sweetness, leather, and pepper. The final third has more wood, more roasted coffee, some vegetal flavors, and that peppery, sweet cream.

 

The draw is great. The smoke is full and white. The burn is almost flawless. The white colored ash is firm. The balance of this smooth cigar is great. Even though there is a pepper, it’s never overpowering. The cigar is medium-bodied yet full-flavored. The smoke time is two hours and thirty minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? I wish that was possible
number95

Categories: 95, Dondurma, Fabrica de Tabacos Joya de Nicaragua, Nicaraguan cigars | Tags: , , ,

Brick House Year of the Rat

Brick House Year of the Rat. J.C. Newman is one of the companies that entered the Chinese Zodiac cigar game with the Brick House brand. But unlike the other brands, Brick House is not using a red-colored box or red-colored rings. In fact, except for the size and the flag tail, you can’t tell the difference between a regular production Brick House or this limited edition. Unless you see the beautiful black box with the painting of the rat and the limited-edition text.


We were unable to find any information about this cigar online, so we suspect that the blend is the exact same as the Brick House Classic. And a classic is. An old brand that was discontinued during the Great Depression. But it has been resurrected by Eric and Bobby Newman about a decade ago. This time as a Nicaraguan cigar, with Nicaraguan fillers and binder. The wrapper comes from Ecuador. And this 6¼x52 toro with the flag tail isn’t a regular production size.


The cigar feels silky. The evenly colored Colorado wrapper is smooth and almost veinless. The nice cap, a flag tail, sets the cigar apart from regular production Brick House cigars. Since there is no secondary ring for the year of the rat, the flag tail is the only sign this is a special release. The Brick House ring is a nicely shaped ring with yellow, red, black and gold color schemes. Classic and stylish. The cigar feels well constructed. The wood aroma is strong.


The cold draw is strong. Just as the flavors of raisin, raw tobacco, and pepper. Once lit the mouthfeel is thick. Hints of dark chocolate, leather, wood, soil, and coffee, all with a bit of pepper. It’s a bit hard to keep the cigar lit in the beginning. But once that problem is solved, the cigar releases sweetness with the bitterness of dark chocolate, and some dry wood flavors. Slowly the flavors become more woody with green herbs, pepper, licorice, and some sweetness. After creating more airflow, the flavors are more chocolate, more pepper, and a bit of salt. All with a creamy mouthfeel. Halfway there is coffee with chocolate, spices, pepper and a hint of citrus. The finale is wood, pepper, green herbs, and leather.


The draw is decent, not the best draw but also not bad enough to complain. The smoke is thick and full. Especially after creating a little bit more of a draw using the cigar redeemer tool. The burn is good. The smoke time of this cigar is exactly three hours. This is a medium-full bodied, medium-full flavored cigar.

Would I buy this cigar again? If it’s priced within the same range as the regular production Brick House, yes.

number90

Categories: 90, Brick House, Nicaraguan cigars, PENSA | Tags: , , , , ,

VegaFina Year of the Rat Toro

VegaFina Year of the Rat Toro. In the last few years, more and more cigar brands are using the Chinese Zodiac Calendar as a reason to release a limited edition cigar. VegaFina is one of those brands. The Dominican cigars started releasing cigars for the Year Of series with the Year of the Dog. After the Year of the Pig, it’s time for the Year of the Rat. Altadis is part of Imperial Brands, although not for long anymore. Imperial Brands is selling its premium cigar division, which includes the Tabacalera de Garcia factory in the Dominican Republic, their portfolio of brands and their 50% stake in Habanos. According to rumors, a Chinese company acquired the premium cigar division yet by the time of writing this review, nothing has been confirmed.

The cigar measures 5⁹⁄₁₀x52 and it comes with a pigtail. The cigar is made in the Dominican Republic, at Altadis’s Tabacalera de Garcia. Tobaccos from Nicaragua and the Dominican Republic are used for the filler. The binder comes from Nicaragua. Altadis did not reveal from which country the wrapper came. But they did mention it’s a Habano 2000 wrapper.

The cigar looks good. A nice Colorado colored wrapper, oily and smooth. There is one thin, yet very noticeable vein on the back. The regular silver and white ring is used, with the glossy metallic red VegaFina logo. Then there is a secondary ring, red with gold, which represents prosperity and wealth in the Chinese culture. The ring says ‘year of the rat’ and a rat is pictured on the ring as well. The cigar feels a bit hard. The foot of the cigar is cut in a slight angle, making the cigar a leaning tower of Pisa. Now even though that’s an imperfection, we have seen it before with several different brands. The aroma is that of manure and oak. It’s medium-strong.

 

Even though the cigar felt a bit hard, the cold draw is fine. With a flavor of spicy raisins. Once lit, the cigar releases a lot of sweetness, sugar water sweetness. With pepper, green herbs and some coffee. Slowly the cigar gets wood in the flavor palate too. The flavor evolves to nutty toast with soil, leather, pepper, and sweetness. These flavors continue through the first third, with a nice sweet and white pepper aftertaste. The mouthfeel is buttery, creamy. The pepper is very mild and distinct. Halfway the pepper gets more pronounced and a little stronger. The sweetness turns into milk chocolate. The final third is sweet and peppery, with leather, wood, milk chocolate, and grass.

 

The draw is great. And the ash is firm, dense, and white as can be. The smoke is thin too and lacks a bit in volume as well. The burn is pretty straight. This is a medium-bodied, medium flavored cigar. The balance of this cigar is spot on. This cigar would be a good match with a nice smooth sipping rum.

Would I buy this cigar again? Yes

number91

Categories: 91, Casa de Garcia, Dominican cigars, VegaFina | Tags: , , , , ,

Flor de Selva Year of the Rat Toro

Flor de Selva Year of the Rat Toro. A few years back, Davidoff started with an annual limited edition based on the Chinese zodiac calendar. And several companies followed, including Maya Selva for her Flor de Selva brand. We know of at least 7 companies that release cigars based on the Chinese zodiac calendar now. But being born in the year of the rat, married to someone with Chinese heritage and living in South East Asia, this year is special. That’s why I will be reviewing several ‘Year of the Rat’ cigars this year.


The Flor de Selva Year of the Rat is a 6×52 Toro. It retails for 19 euro in Germany, Europe’s largest cigar market. The cigar is made from tobaccos from Honduras and Nicaragua. The wrapper comes from Honduras. The binder is Nicaraguan. And the filler contains tobacco from both countries.

The cigar has two rings. The simple faded yellow and greenish Flor de Selva ring. But the foot ring sets the cigar apart from the rest of the Flor de Selva lines. It’s red, the Chinese color of prosperity. And it combines the image of the rat with Mayan hieroglyphics, merging Honduran and Chinese cultures together in this cigar. The wrapper is Colorado colored, with a sharp thin vein on the side. It isn’t the best looking cigar out there, but it’s also not the worst looking cigar. The construction feels great. The nose is nice. A warm aroma of hay and wood, medium strong.


The cold draw is nice, with a nice tobacco flavor. After lighting it’s a mellow and sweet coffee with soil flavor. There is some toast and a nice mix of gingerbread spices as well. The flavors are mellow, smooth and well balanced. There’s a slow evolution to cedar with the spices, toast, and sweetness. The aftertaste has a hint of white pepper. The sweetness is pure honey. The mouthfeel is creamy. Slowly the pepper gains more strength but the honey toast with cedar remains the base flavor for the cigar. In the second third, leather shows up and it’s a beautiful combination with the growing white pepper, toast, spices, and honey. In the final third, the cigar gets stronger, with more pepper, leather, and wood. The toast is dissolving, just like the honey. And the balance starts to disappear as well. And then the sweetness returns. The cigar now has a flavor profile of pepper, sweetness, and cedar with leather.


The draw is phenomenal. The light gray ash is a bit flaky. The burn is straight as an arrow. The smoke is good in volume but could be a bit thicker for a higher score. This is a medium-bodied, full-flavored cigar. The balance was spot on in the first two thirds, with a silky smooth flavor profile. The smoke time is two hours and fifteen minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? It’s expensive but I wouldn’t mind a few more
number92

Categories: 92, Flor de Selva, Honduran cigars, Tabacalera del Oriente | Tags: , , , ,

Antigua Esteli Segovia Maduro Toro.

Antigua Esteli Segovia Maduro Toro. The first time we ever saw or heard the brand was on social media. At first, we figured it would be one of those private labels again that try to make a few bucks before disappearing into the swamp. The swamp where many other small private labels have been buried over the years. But the more we looked into Antigua Esteli, the more we were intrigued. And the more we wanted to try one of those cigars. We connected with owner and founder Art Garcia and learned more about the brand. It’s more than just a simple private label. Garcia runs his own crew at the factory, his rollers, blenders and buys the tobacco himself. In September we finally met at the Intertabac trade show and weaseled a few cigars so we could finally smoke them


We scored the Antigua Esteli Segovia Maduro Toro. That’s a 6×56 cigar, made in Nicaragua. The fillers and binder are all Nicaraguan. The tobacco comes from four different regions in Nicaragua. The wrapper comes from the San Andres region in Mexico. The shape is unusual, it’s not fully box-pressed, it’s not round but it’s semi box-pressed.


The cigar looks beautiful. An evenly dark, smooth and oily wrapper. Great shape with a triple cap. The cigar feels well constructed. The ring is detailed, with tobacco fields, the logo. And both the American and Nicaraguan flags in a banner combining the two countries. The secondary ring says Segovias Maduro. The aroma is strong, barnyard, wood, and forest come to mind.


The cold draw is easy, and it leaves a peppery flavor on the lips. A tingling sensation. Add a raw tobacco flavor to it, and that’s what the cold draw tastes like. Once lit, there is a mix of coffee, leather, soil, spices, and pepper. The bitterness of the coffee is a nice contrast with the creaminess of the mouthfeel. Soon it’s more coffee with leather and spices. There’s also a bit of citrus, and the mouthfeel remains creamy. After a third, it’s a toasty coffee flavor with wood, spices, and pepper. Still creamy though. The creaminess makes the flavors feel silky smooth. The final third starts with ice cream without the numbing cold of ice cream. Vanilla sweetness, cream, and roasted coffee beans. Then the coffee returns, with way more pepper than before.


The draw is great, and the burn is straight as an arrow. The ash is white, but a bit brittle. The cigar produces a lot of smoke. The flavors are all smooth, round, and soft. Yet medium to medium-full in flavors, and medium in strength. The smoke time is two hours and thirty minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? Yes I will
number91

Categories: 91, Antigua Esteli, Nicaraguan cigars | Tags: , , , , ,

Siempre Sun Grown Toro

Siempre Sun Grown Toro. Earlier this year, I was approached by one of our contacts who’s working for a European cigar distributor. His question was if I ever heard of Dapper Cigar Company. And honestly, the answer was no. So I googled them, and the brand sparked my interest. They provide a lot of information about the blends on their website. As cigar media, that’s something we love. That cigar distributor decided not to take on Dapper Cigar Company. But another distributor in The Netherlands did, Kelch Trading introduced Dapper Cigars on the Dutch market.


The Siempre Sun Grown Toro sports a Sun Grown Sumatra wrapper from Ecuador. The binder is Connecticut Broadleaf from the United States. The filler comes from Honduras and three regions of Nicaragua. Those are Ometepe, Jalapa, and Esteli. On the website, Dapper Cigar Company even discloses the growers of the wrappers and some of the farms where the wrappers are grown. That kind of information is often hard to, or impossible, to find. The Siempre Sun Grown line was introduced in 2016.


The cigar looks great. The toothy wrapper is dark and oily. The triple cap is flawless. And the orange and gold ring just pops from that dark background. The cigar feels well constructed, we couldn’t find any plugs or soft spots on the touch. The aroma of the cigar is like charred wood and farmyard.


The cold draw is great. The flavors are meaty and earthy before the cigar is lit, with pepper on the tongue. Once lit, the cigar is earthy, spicy, and sweet. Add in some coffee, and that’s the flavor profile in the first puffs. The earthiness and pepper are the main flavors. And the flavors are meaty in mouthfeel. Slowly some spices and dry wood show up too. The pepper mellows out a little bit. Then suddenly it’s espresso with pepper and some citrus acidity. The pepper gets a bit stronger after a third, with a thick, creamy mouthfeel. There’s pepper, spices, wood, coffee, and earthiness. The pepper has a little bite every now and then. After two thirds, a leathery, peppery, cocoa flavor shows up as well. The cigar picks up in strength, power, and pepper. Then the coffee flavor returns as well.


The draw is good. The ash is a little dark though. The burn was alright, although it needed a touch up now and then. The smoke is medium thick and full. This cigar is balanced, although sometimes the pepper has a little bite. The cigar is medium to medium-full bodied and flavored. The smoke time is three hours

Would I buy this cigar again? Yes I liked it. It matched my profile.

number90

Categories: 90, Dapper Cigars, Nicaraguan cigars | Tags: , , , ,

Arturo Fuente Opus X 20th anniversary Father & Son

Arturo Fuente Opus X 20th anniversary Father & Son. In 1995, Arturo Fuente released a new cigar. The Arturo Fuente Opus X. It was a prestigious project for the Fuente family. Against all odds, they grew wrapper in the Dominican Republic. Where everybody said it couldn’t be done, Fuente did it. They grew Habano seed tobaccos under a cloth and created a rich and beautiful wrapper. The Opus X was the first premium Dominican puro. It became a highly sought after cigar, available in limited quantities. And now, 25 years later, that is still the case.

In 2015, Carlito Fuente released his tribute to the original Fuente Fuente Opus X. He said he wanted to blend something that made his grandfather and father proud. Something that brought him to his childhood, something that made him happy. And that was the 20th Anniversary. Available in four different vitolas. A 61/2×52 Figurado with the name God’s whisper is the most prolific. But there’s a torpedo as well, 6⅜x52, with the name power of the dream. Then there’s a 5¾x52 Robusto called Believe. And the fourth cigars is the one being reviewed. The 6¼x49 Father & Son.

The cigar has a Colorado Claro colored wrapper, hidden from the eye with a piece of cedar. Once removed, the wrapper is clear, smooth, yet it looks a bit dry. The aroma is quite mild, sawdust and wood. The cigar feels good, well packed and evenly packed. The shape and cap are perfect. And then the ring. The classic Opus X ring in blue instead of red. A secondary ring in the same colors, on the same high-quality paper, says 20 years. 100 out of 100 points for the ring. The foot of the cigar clearly shows different tobaccos, with different colors.


The cold draw is just perfect. Mild spicy with some sweetness in the flavors. After lighting, a very balanced and smooth mixture of spice, coffee, and sweetness is tasted. The flavors then turn wood, with spices, and leather. There’s also some faint vanilla and grass. All smooth flavors, balanced, like an aged cigar. After a centimeter, a nice fresh lemon flavor binds everything together. The sweetness is molasses, and it’s getting a bit stronger. The mouthfeel is creamy, buttery. The spice and pepper get some strength after a while. The main flavors turn to wood and sweetness, but the sweetness is different than the molasses tasted earlier. After a third, the cigar gets meatier in mouthfeel, with wood and vanilla as main flavors. Halfway the coffee returns, with gingerbread spices and vanilla. The flavors remain smooth and balanced all the way through the cigar. The strength does pick up in the final third though.

The draw is great. The smoke is good too, not spectacular but good. The light-colored ash is firm and dense. The burn is sharp. The cigar is very smooth and balanced. Medium-bodied, medium-full flavored without any harshness at all. The smoke time is three hours, fifteen minutes. Nubbed it till my fingers and lips burned.

Would I buy this cigar again? Yes, even with this price, I want to smoke it on special occasions
number94

Categories: 94, Arturo Fuente, Dominican cigars, Tabacalera A. Fuente y Cia | Tags: , , , , ,

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