Posts Tagged With: torpedo

Daniel Marshall by Carlos Fuente – XXXVIII Limited Edition

Daniel Marshall by Carlos Fuente – XXXVIII Limited Edition. Earlier this year, Daniel Marshall announced a very special limited edition for his 38th anniversary. A cigar made for him by no other than Carlito Fuente, to honor their decades’ long friendship. As Marshall said “Carlos and I grew up together from boys to men sharing similar values, commitment to quality and an unrelenting quest for the best. What joins us together, the golden thread that runs through our veins and drives us to live our dreams is a commitment to creativity in all we do a richness of character and generosity of spirit.” Fuente called making the cigar a great honor and thanked Marshall for the opportunity. The cigar will be sold at 38 locations worldwide and is already highly sought after.

The cigar is a Dominican puro, with all tobaccos grown at Chateau de La Fuente. Some of the tobacco is aged up to 12 years. Marshall and Fuente did not reveal how many cigars are released. The cigar is only available in a 6⅜x52 Torpedo and comes in exclusive Daniel Marshall travel humidors. The humidors can carry up to 20 cigars but come with 8 of these limited edition masterpieces. As Carlos Fuente said “What a huge honor and privilege this project has been for me. It was a calling of the heart for a special friendship that I have cherished and appreciated for long before most anyone reading this knew anything about cigars. Thank you Daniel Marshall for being who you are and have been consistently all these many, many years.” Ministry of Cigars will add a thank you to Daniel Marshall for sponsoring this unicorn.

The cigar has a smooth, Clara colored wrapper. Silky and delicate. The torpedo is semi box-pressed and feels evenly filled. The cigar has two rings, a white and gold primary ring, with Marshall’s signature. The secondary ring is gold, but unlike many limited-edition rings, this is not a copy from Habanos. It’s gold with black and has a row of dots but that’s where the similarities stop. The font is different, the letters aren’t black. This ring is embossed, and much more upscale than the Habanos rings. You can see the effort and love poured into the design. The aroma is strong, deep spices such as cumin mixed with a barnyard aroma. Very pleasant, complex, and promising.

The cold draw is perfect, with a smooth leather flavor. From the start, there is honey with a slight citrus acidity, smooth leather, and a little earthiness. Add a little red pepper on the lips and you’ll get the flavor of this cigar. The honey sweetness remains, with wood, earthiness, pepper, spices, and some salt. The flavors already show complexity. Slowly coffee shows up as well, with some citrus again. The honey sweetness remains, just like cedarwood and pepper. Slowly the flavors turn more to cedar with white pepper. There is still some sweetness and citrus though, but more on the background with some coffee. The cigar slowly turns to more of a coffee-flavored cigar. But the flavor changes are very nuanced, very smooth, and very complexed. There is some sweetness, yet it is no longer honey but more like cane sugar. In the final third, there’s pepper with a smooth silky milk chocolate. The flavors are so smooth that even in the last third, retrohaling is not an issue. Cedar shows up on the palate again. Still with the milk chocolate and pepper.

The draw is phenomenal. The smoke is plentiful. It’s thick, it’s white, it’s voluminous. The light gray ash is firm, like a stack of dimes. And the burn? It’s straight. This is a medium-bodied and medium flavored cigar. But it’s balanced, complex, and smooth. This is a cigar best enjoyed in solitary. It deserves full attention. Experience as a cigar smoker and a good palate are required to fully ‘get’ this cigar. The smoke time is two hours and forty minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? I wish I could

Categories: 93, Daniel Marshall, Dominican cigars, Tabacalera A. Fuente y Cia | Tags: , , , , ,

Alec Bradley Orchant Seleccion Pointy

Alec Bradley Orchant Seleccion. For the last few years, the British cigar retailer Cgars Ltd has been creating limited editions under the name Orchant Seleccion. It started in 2007 as a collaboration with Habanos distributor Hunters & Frankau. They approached Orchant with the idea to hand-select boxes of cigars that he thought were outstanding. Then add an ‘Orchant Seleccion’ ring and sell them exclusively through his C. Gars Ltd shop. Up till today, approximately 20 different Cuban cigars are part of the Orchant Seleccion. But all in a limited number of boxes, and gone is gone. But it’s not limited to Cuban cigars anymore.


In the last few years, Orchant found several producers of New World cigars to create a limited edition exclusively for Cgars Ltd and Turmeaus Tobacconist. Davidoff created one. Regius did an Orchant Seleccion, just like Oliva. Alec Bradley did one and last year Drew Estate created three different sizes under the Orchant Seleccion name. Those are the lightweight, middleweight, and heavyweight. But recently the Alec Bradley Orchant Seleccion made a comeback. Not as a rerun of the old version, but the same blend of Nicaraguan and Honduran tobaccos. Yet in three different, smaller, sizes. Including a rare, unique twist on the Culebra. Shorter and thicker than a regular Culebra, and with the name Twisty. The other two sizes are the Orchie and the Pointy. The Pointy is the second of the three cigars that will be reviewed.


The wrapper looks quite similar to the Alec Bradley Orchant Seleccion Orchie. Colorado Maduro colored, leathery with a long thin vein. But the green waterspot is missing. That makes the cigar ecstatically a little more pleasing. The dark, detailed ring is exactly the same. The O on the ring does have similarities with the Oliva logo. The aroma of this short, pointy cigar is darker than of the Orchie. More manure and barnyard than spices.


The cold draw is flawless, with a raw tobacco flavor. Once it, the cigar is salty with soil, coffee, and green herbs. There is a slight white pepper on the palate as well. The flavor then turns to something best described as black licorice with some dry leather and a little bit of coffee. The mouthfeel is chewy. The flavors are dark and become even darker with a burnt flavor. Burnt barbecue wood, pepper, green herbs. But a little evasive to the back of the throat. The cigar becomes more approachable, less burnt. More wood with dark roast coffee and pepper. The cigar then turns to earthiness, dark roast, pepper, and a little bit of a nutty flavor. The nutty flavor disappears as quickly as it showed up though. The pepper gains strength. A little sweetness shows up too. Near the end, it is dark wood, dark roast coffee, and very strong pepper.


The draw is good. The smoke is good, enough in volume yet it could be a tad thicker. The burn had to be corrected a few times. The ash is darker than the ash on the Orchie. The cigar is not balanced in the first third but balances out in the rest of the cigar. It’s a medium-full to full smoke. Full-flavored. Dark flavors, something we call a ‘winter’ cigar as it fits with the mood that comes with the shorter, darker days. The smoke time is two hours and twenty minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? Maybe

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Categories: 89, Alec Bradley, Honduran cigars, Raices Cubanas | Tags: , , , ,

Royal Danish Cigars Weihnachten

Royal Danish Cigars Weihnachten. For those that don’t speak German, Weihnachten is Christmas in the German language. So this is the Christmas cigar from Royal Danish. Jan Vistisen, the owner and founder of the Danish cigar brand, trademarked ‘Christmas’ for cigars and this is the first time he uses the trademark for a commercial release. He showed the cigars at the Intertabac trade show last September and gave me a sampler to smoke during the holidays.

The Christmas cigar is a play on the Royal Danish Sangre Azul 2.0. And that cigar is a mediumfiller or a Cuban sandwich as some call it. It’s made with the clippings of the expensive Royal Danish Regal Blend West Indies line. But the clippings aren’t chopped up to smaller pieces, so it’s not a shortfiller. As far as our information goes, the cigar is a Nicaraguan puro with a dark Habano wrapper.

 

The wrapper is dark, almost Oscuro. The box-pressed torpedo measures 6×50 but the head is a little uneven. The main ring is the black Royal Danish ring with the white letters, golden details and the Danish flag in the center. The secondary ring is the Cuban regional edition ring with the text ‘Weihnachten leckerbissen’ which translates to Christmas treats. The cigar feels good and looks good. The cigar has a medium-strong aroma of hay.

 

The cold draw is good. A slightly bitter flavor of dark chocolate and raw tobacco comes from the cold draw. That dark chocolate remains after lighting, but now with coffee and soil. The flavors are a bit muted. Dark chocolate, leather, pepper, and earthiness. Slowly a nutty flavor shows up too, with some sweetness. But then after a centimeter and a half, the cigar suddenly awakes. The flavors are no longer muted but crisp. The smoke gets thicker as well. The pepper grows and there is even a hint of vanilla. The chocolate flavors taste like old fashioned brownies, thick and delicious. In the final third, the pepper grows stronger. The cigar gets more wood now, with earthiness and pepper.

The draw is fine. The ash is light gray but not very firm. The smoke is thick and full. The burn had to be corrected once. This cigar is full-bodied and full-flavored. The smoke time is two hours and fifteen minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? To be honest, for €825 I would pick a premium Longfiller

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Categories: 91, Nicaraguan cigars, Royal Danish | Tags: , , , , ,

Davtian Habana Torpedo Rojizo

Davtian Habana Torpedo Rojizo. This is the second Davtian blend that Ministry f Cigars is smoking and reviewing. The brand was founded by the Armenian businessman and cigars aficionado David Davtian in 2011. That was 8 years after Davtian became a retailer and distributor for several Non-Cuban brands for Armenia. And five years after he became the chairman of the Armenian Association. He traveled to all the cigar producing countries in the Caribbean and decided that the Dominican Republic would be the country for his own brand. Davtian Cigars was born. Last may, we reviewed the Davtian Primus Robusto Gordo.


There isn’t a lot of information about Davtian cigars on the web. None of the other major cigar media outlets have articles on the brand. And the Davtian website does offer some information, but not all. It took some digging to found out that the cigars are made at El Puente Cigar Factory. And the information for the blend is more detailed than with most producers. Yet the information from what country the tobaccos come from is lacking. The information is too detailed for most cigar smokers in our opinion.

The cigar has a rough looking wrapper. Leathery, dry, yet not unappealing. The tip of the torpedo leans a bit to the right though. The burgundy and silver ring looks good, high quality paper and printing. The logo is very detailed. The cigar has a strong barnyard, manure and hay aroma. It feels evenly packed with the right amount of sponginess.

The cold draw is great. The cigar has the flavors of raw tobacco, but with a mild, marzipan-like, sweetness. After lighting there’s a sweet coffee. Yet the cigar keeps dying. Once that is solved, the flavors are dry. Mild spicy, like gingerbread, with toast and leather.And then, after twenty minutes, a hefty pepper shows up. Red pepper, that makes the lips tingle. The flavors then evolve to leather, soil, pepper and a little sourness. Not citrus acidity, but more sour. The cigar is nothing more than decent at this point. With a mild buttery mouthfeel. The cigar turns dry. With leather, pepper, green herbs, and a little sweetness. The mouthfeel is very dry too. In the final third, the cigar gets stronger, yet sweeter. With more pepper, leather and dry tobacco. Theres even a little woody flavor in the final third.

The cigar keeps dying in the beginning. It has to be relit over and over again before it finally stays lit. The cigars were stored in perfect humidity, so it’s not an over or under humidification issue. The draw is great. The smoke is light gray. It’s also thick and voluminous. The ash is light gray, its a little flaky yet firm. The burn needs to be corrected on several occasions. This cigar is medium full bodied and medium flavored. The smoke time is two hours and fifteen minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? Nah

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Categories: 89, Davtian, Dominican cigars | Tags: , ,

Blanco Above & Beyond Unwilling

Blanco Above & Beyond Unwilling. David Blanco, the CEO of Blanco Cigars, has a background in the military. Just as his father. And that background prompted them to create a cigar for the heroes that sacrificed all. For those that paid the ultimate price. Not just in the armed forces, but also in the civil service. As a former deputy sheriff and Chicago Fire Department paramedic, David Blanco knows first hand about those sacrifices. On top of his civil service, he served close to 30 years in the American Army. Both in active duty, National Guard and Reservist. He served 18 months in the Global War on Terrorism and Operation Enduring Freedom which brought him to Afghanistan. And at the same time, his father was serving in Iraq. Currently, Blanco is still an active jumpmaster for the United States Army Reserve. He joins veterans at World War II memorial jumps over Europe every chance he gets.


The Blanco Above and Beyond cigars honor those heroes. Part of the proceeds of the cigars goes to charities that help families of fallen service members, or survivors of tragedies while serving. And the cigars represent that. When a service member gets killed, the family members get an American flag, neatly folded into a triangle. All for sizes of the Above & Beyond are torpedos so that the head of the cigars can get a triangle-shaped blue ring with white stars. That resembles the American flag that the family members of fallen servicemen and women get. The cigar itself is a rebranded classic from Blanco Cigars, the American Legion cigar. The wrapper comes from Nicaragua. It’s a Rosado Habano wrapper. The binder is Honduran. The fillers come from both Nicaragua and Honduras.


The cigar has a beautiful reddish-brown wrapper. The point of the torpedo is extremely pointy and sharp for a cigar, The black and silver ring has the American flag. The Blanco name is written in the colors of the fire brigade, police and paramedics. Their logos are on the back of the ring as well. There is a text printed as well, probably the pledge of alliance but since we are not American, we don’t know for sure. The cigar feels well constructed. The aroma is strong. Wood, horses and a little ammonia comes to mind. After a third, it’s pepper, toast, spices, sweetness but now with wood as well. The mouthfeel is quite dry.


The cold draw is loose. The pre-draw is a little dry, with nutmeg and slightly wet hay. But those flavors are faint. Once lit, there is a bitter grassy flavor with spices and pepper. Not unpleasant, but quite unrefined. Soon, the cigar gets more balanced and the flavors get more rounded. The nutmeg and spices start to shine through. When some sweetness shows up, the bitterness fades away. After half a centimeter, the cigar has a sweet toasted flavor, with cinnamon and pepper. Halfway the cigar has a salty, licorice flavor with toast, spices, and pepper. The cinnamon-like sweetness returns, with wood, salt, licorice, and toast. The licorice flavor remains strong, with spices, wood, and pepper.


The smoke is thick and plentiful. The draw is good. The burn is a little off but doesn’t have to be corrected. The cigar is medium to medium full-bodied. The flavors are medium-full as well, with enough evolution to keep the cigar interesting all the way. The smoke time is two hours fifteen minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? Yeah, once in a while

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Categories: 90, Blanco Cigars, Nicaraguan cigars, Tabacos de Oriente Nicaragua | Tags: , , , , ,

ACID Kuba Arte

Drew Estate Acid Kuba Arte. A limited edition Drew Estate Acid to commemorate 20 years of Drew Estate Acid Kuba. And they come packed in pieces of art. Water towers containing 20 cigars and a boveda pack. All the water towers are hand pained by New York based street artists. That is a tribute to the art side that Drew Estate always had, from day one. The company was founded in Brooklyn, and the 5 artists all have roots in that burrough of New York as well. Back in the day, Jonathan Drew was sitting on a rooftop in Brooklyn, and he saw water towers and graffiti. Now he brings it back together.

The cigar is infused. Premium tobaccos have been used though. From a beautiful American grown broadleaf Maduro wrapper to the hearty Nicaraguan fillers. Add am Indonesian binder and you have the blend. Drew Estate uses a unique infusion method, one of the best kept secrets in the industry to turn the cigars into the ACID lines. People love it, or hate it. There is no in-between. They sell like hotcakes, yet a lot of natural cigar smokers look down on the acid lines.


The cigar looks great. A dark, oily wrapper. No visible veins. The cigar is slightly box-pressed. The ring is in graffiti style, and mentions it’s a limited edition. The aroma is strong, once removed from the cellophane you can immediately smell a chemical aroma that is unusual for cigars. It reminded us of toilet cakes, liquid soap and flowers. The cigar looks and feels well constructed. While wetting the cap, before cutting it, the chemical taste is pretty strong.


The cold draw is pretty good. The wrapper leaves a sweet flavor on the lips, the tobacco itself has some pepper. The first puffs are overpowered by the sweetness of the wrapper. The unnatural sweetness. Once the initial shock of the unnatural sweetness is gone, it’s not that bad. Sweetness, with some spices and pepper. A little coffee shows up, and the pepper mellows out. The floral, chemical sweetness is still very dominant. There are hints of dried leaves and leather on the background as well. After a third it’s still sweet, floral sweet, with pepper, leather, and toast on the background. Halfway the sweetness is at a level where it’s actually pleasant, although still a bit too strong. The flavors remain the same, with that dominant sweetness, some pepper, leather and toast.


The draw is fantastic. And the smoke is plentiful, like with the natural premium cigars from the same factory. The light colored ash isn’t very firm. The cigar is medium bodied, yet full flavored although the flavor isn’t very natural.

Would I buy this cigar again? I prefer natural cigars but this wasn’t bad

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Categories: 90, ACID, Gran Fabrica Drew Estate, Nicaraguan cigars | Tags: , , , , , ,

Cigar of the month February

I decided to make February Fernandez month, all cigars I reviewed for this month are made at the A.J. Fernandez factory in Esteli, Nicaragua, a factory I have visited in 2015 and a factory that produces some of my favourite cigars.

The cigar with the highest rating last month are two cigars with the exact same score:

San Lotano Pigskin & Man’o’war Skull Crusher with a 94 score

Now as for the complete list of cigars I published:

1) San Lotano Pigskin (Nicaragua) 94 points
1) Man’o’war Skull Crusher (Nicaragua) 94 points
3) Ave Maria Divinia (Nicaragua) 93 points
4) Ave Maria Reconquista  (Nicaragua) 92 points
5) San Lotano Maduro Lancero (Nicaragua) 92 points
6) San Lotano Habano Lancero (Nicaragua) 92 points
6) Man’o’war little devil (Nicaragua) 92 points
8) San Lotano Maduro Robusto (Nicaragua) 92 points
8) San Lotano The Bull Robusto (Nicaragua) 92 points
10) Man’o’War 52C (Nicaragua) 92 points
11) Man’o’War Ruination Torpedo (Nicaragua) 91 points
12) Reposado Habano Salomon (Nicaragua) 91 points
13) La Herencia Cubana Perfecto (Nicaragua) 91 points
14) Reposado Maduro Salomon (Nicaragua) 90 points
15) Man’o’war Phalanx (Nicaragua) 90 points
16) La Herencia Cubana Fuerte Robusto (Nicaragua) 90 points
17) Ave Maria Churchill (Nicaragua) 90 points
18) Man’o’war Torpedo (Nicaragua) 90 points
19) Man’o’war Virtue Torpedo (Nicaragua) 89 points
20) Puro Autentico Maduro (Nicaragua) 89 points
21) Puro Autentico Ligero (Nicaragua) 89 points

 

Categories: Cigar of the month | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Manowar Anthology Sampler: Manowar Ruination Torpedo

Less than a year after the so successful release of the Man O’ War series, Meier & Dutch and A.J. Fernandez came with a new blend, even stronger and bolder than the original. A blend that would blow you away, kill you and leave you ruined so the name Ruination was picked for the second Man O’ War release.


The cigar, of which I’m smoking the 5.7×56 Belicoso featured in the Anthology Sampler, is made from Honduran and Nicaraguan ligero with a Nicaraguan Habano binder. The wrapper comes from Ecuador and is of a Habano ligero kind.


The cigar looks tough, the dark, bitter chocolate colored wrapper with a leathery touch, the Man O’ War wing in darker colors, the fat yet pointy shape, well finished, it all makes this cigar look bad ass yet cool. The aroma is medium strong, it smells like manure and wood.


I used my butterfly cutter to take the cap off. The cold draw is good, I taste a little pepper and well fermented tobacco. After lighting I taste coffee, mild spicy, with some acidity and pepper. After a centimeter I taste soil with some sweetness. The sweetness slowly grows. Halfway I taste wood, cinnamon, sweetness and soil. The sweetness is balanced perfectly with the other flavors. The final third starts with vegetable flavors, a strong flower flavor, some wood and soil, all balanced and very nice.


The draw is good. The smoke is medium thick and full. The light gray ash is dense, firm with nice rings. The burn is good, quite straight. The cigar is medium full bodied, full flavored. The flavors are well balanced. The smoke time is two hours.

Would I buy this cigar again? Yes, loved it.

Score: 91
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Categories: 91, Manowar, Nicaraguan cigars, Tabacalera A.J. Fernandez | Tags: , , , , , ,

Manowar Anthology Sampler: Manowar Torpedo

In the first part of 2008 Meier & Dutch together with A.J. Fernandez released what would become one of their success stories, the Man O’ War line, that has sprouted in many more lines and side projects in the last decade, but this blend with Nicaraguan filler, Honduran Habano binder and Ecuadorian Habano wrapper started it all.


The cigar comes in six different vitolas, from a 6×44 corona to a 7.1×58 salomon with a 7 1/2×52 double corona 5 1/2×50 robusto, a 6 1/2×52 toro and a 6.1×54 torpedo. I’m smoking the torpedo as that was the one in the Man O’ War anthology sampler.


The wrapper is a nice, medium dark, brown, in between milk chocolate and dark chocolate. The ring is the regular Man O’ War ring like described two days ago. The cigar feels good and is well finished. It has a medium strong, deep, spicy and peppery aroma.


Due to the vitola I have no other option than to cut the cigar. The cold draw is fine and I taste a little peppery raising flavor. After lighting I taste wood, coffee and a little nutmeg. After a centimeter the basic flavor is wood, with nutmeg, cinnamon and ground black pepper. The pepper is getting stronger with a bit of vegetable flavor joining the wood as a base aroma. After a third I taste soil with some sweetness too. The cigar gets stronger, more woody, more peppery.


The draw is great. The smoke, with a little brown glow, is thick and full. The ash has that same brown tarnish as the smoke. The burn is straight, the cigar is full bodied and full flavored. I smoked slow and it took me two hours to finish the cigar.

Would I buy this cigar again? Maybe, if they are on sale.

Score: 90
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Categories: 90, Manowar, Nicaraguan cigars, Tabacalera A.J. Fernandez | Tags: , , , , ,

Manowar Anthology Sampler: Manowar Virtue Torpedo

Last year, in september, I reviewed the same cigar. I did that before I came up with the idea to review this complete sampler but I’m not going to change my plans because of that older review, let’s just call this a quick redux.


The Man O’ War Virtue line was releases only two years after the Man O’ War brand came to life, and it was the third blend that got released. The regular Man O’ War and the Man O’ War Ruination were strong cigars, this Man O’ War Virtue, with the Nicaraguan Habano filler and binder and the Ecuadorian Connecticut wrapper was in a different league, the league of mild to medium cigars.


The light colored, almost pale, wrapper looks dry and brittle. The ring is the same as the other Man O’ War rings but in white and silver, making it more difficult to see what the picture is. The cigar is well made, it feels good and looks good. It has a medium strong hay and ammonia aroma.


The cold draw is fine, I taste dry, mild sweet and mild acidic raisin and tobacco. After lighting I taste a metallic dirt aroma. There’s also that classic Connecticut Shade mustiness. After the metallic dirt disappears I taste cedar, mild sweet, with that classic mustiness and a bit of black pepper. The flavors remain practically the same all around, except for a little metallic flavor returning at the end and the pepper grew in strength. In the dying seconds I taste some nuts too.


The draw is a bit loose and the cigar produces a lot of smoke. The salt and peppered colored ash is firm and pretty. The burn is straight. The cigar is medium bodied and medium flavored. The smoke time is an hour and forty minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? Nah, it’s a classic Connecticut Shade, which I don’t appreciate

Score: 89
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Categories: 89, Manowar, Nicaraguan cigars, Tabacalera A.J. Fernandez | Tags: , , , , , , ,

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