Posts Tagged With: Vintage

Montecristo Tubos 2003

Montecristo Tubos 2003. This is a gift from a collector and trader of Cuban cigars. The man is a friend of Ministry of Cigars, and he donated a few aged and vintage cigars for us to review. This particular cigar was made in 2003 and comes from the collection of a Greek collector, who has a very well designed aging system for his cigars.

Montecristo was founded in 1935 when Alonso Menendez bought the Particulares Factory and the two brands they made: Particulares and Byron. Then he changed the name into Montecristo. Menendez’s favorite book was The Count of Monte Cristo by Alexandre Dumas. Later on, he bought the H. Upmann factory. And that gave birth to Hunters & Frankau, the exclusive Habanos distributor in the UK. Hunters were the exclusive distributor for Montecristo, Frankau had the rights to H. Upmann. They merged and are still active today. The Corona Grande in the tubos was released somewhere in the 1970s and is still in production today.

The cigar looks good. Colorado Claro in color, no veins that make it unappealing. The wrapper is soft like velvet. The ring is simple, classic. Just a small brown ring with the white Montecristo logo. The aroma is amazing. Strong, cocoa and hay but mainly cocoa.


The cold draw is a bit tight. 2003 is a year where the tobacco wasn’t rushed through fermentation yet, but it was at the end of a period where a lot of new rollers were hired. And with new, unexperienced rollers and not enough quality control, the early 2000s are notorious for having a bad draw. The cold draw has a mild leathery and strong hay flavor. From the moment the cigar is lit, the flavors are soil and coffee with a hint of marzipan sweetness. After a few puffs, leather shows up. A centimeter in, the cigar tastes like leather with chocolate. There’s still some of the marzipan sweetness lingering around in the aftertaste. The cigar than turns to leather with toast and some salt. The flavors are mild, smooth and mild. This is a great morning cigar after a light breakfast. Halfway there’s a strong hazelnut flavor, with toast, leather, pepper, and green herbs. There’s chocolate too. The final third has pepper, wood, leather, toast, and nuts. It’s still smooth but the flavors are much stronger than in the beginning.


The draw is a bit on the tight side, but still acceptable. The ash is light gray and quite dense. But not firm at all, it breaks off easily. The smoke is thick for a Cuban cigar. And white. The burn is very straight. This is a medium-bodied, medium flavored cigar. It starts out mild but grows to medium-full flavored. The smoke time is one hour and fifty minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? With 16 years of age? I would love to.

number90

Categories: 90, Cuban cigars, Montecristo (Habanos) | Tags: , , , , ,

Partagas Salomones – Vintage –

In 2008 Habanos introduced the Partagas Salomones as a La Casa del Habano exclusive cigar. But the cigars were not new. They have been released as special releases before such as in the 1995 humidor. And in the late 1990s and early 2000s, you could buy bundles of these cigars on Cuba. Counterfeits weren’t as rampant as today, factories weren’t as strict as now. So it was possible to have real, good quality cigars with the correct blend outside of the regular production portfolio.

The Partagas Salomones has been a regular production since 2008. But exclusively sold in La Casa del Habano shops worldwide. With an extra LCDH ring of course. Other Partagas Salomones releases were the Salomones Espanola in the 1995 Partagas Espanola humidor. A smaller version, one inch smaller to be precise, was released in the Silo XXI Millennium Humidor from 1999. And the 2000 Partagas 155 Aniversario humidor had the 7¼x57 Partagas Salomones as well. Since the cigar that we are reviewing is from 2000, it’s most likely that it is an overproduction cigar for this humidor that was sold in a bundle.

The cigar looks great. The shape is amazing. The wrapper is Colorado colored, mild oily and only has one thin vein. The old Partagas ring is used. That means the cigar is pre-2002. That’s when the rings changed. The touch is great, the right amount of bounce when we softly squeeze the cigar. And the cigar has this mild grassy and hay aroma that you can only find in vintage cigars.

The cold draw is a bit tight, but that has to do with the shape. The flavor is leather with spice. Quite strong for a vintage cigar. Right from the start, I taste salt and leather. This is the leather that was so typical for Cubans back in the day. There’s also a very mild pepper and some cedar. Leather remains, a nice floral sweetness shines through. Complex, well balanced. The mouthfeel is very creamy. Mild cinnamon is there as well. A few puffs later, there is some toast. After an inch, there’s a faint flavor that comes close to Nutella. Hazelnut and chocolate, but it’s very faint. The dry, aged, leather is the base flavor, the other flavors dance around it. Sometimes it’s cedar, sometimes pepper. Sometimes floral flavors and then the chocolate again. All well balanced like a beautiful ballet performance. Sophisticated is the right way to describe the flavors. After a third, the pepper becomes a bit more prominent. Not that it comes close to being a pepper bomb, it remains subtle. Chocolate becomes stronger too, slowly. In the last third, the sweetness is stronger. Almost like drinking a nice, small sip of sugar water. But still, with the leather and pepper. The sweetness mellows out, the pepper gains some strength. The flavors get a little salty as well.

The draw is great. The light-colored ash is firm. The smoke is good. It’s not a Drew Estate smoke bomb, but the smoke is medium in thickness and volume. The burn is straight. The cigar is medium bodied, medium flavored. Very complex, subtle and sophisticated. Delicate almost. And it shows how good Cuban cigars can be if the tobacco is treated the right way. If the soil is well maintained. If no shortcuts are taken in the fermentation and aging. And when quality control is at a high level. The smoke time is three hours and thirty minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? Buying a rare 19-year-old cigar is impossible

number93

Categories: 93, Cuban cigars, Partagas (Habanos) | Tags: , , , ,

Bolivar Coronas Extra Vintage 2003

Bolivar Coronas Extra Vintage 2003. You won’t find any of these cigars post-2012, as the cigar was discontinued in that year. But the sample that we are reviewing is from 2003. This is one of the many cigars that Habanos and Cubatabaco have discontinued in the last 20 years in favor of thicker cigars that seems to be catered for the American market. The American market is a no-go area for Cuban cigars, yet a big portion of the yearly production of Cuban cigars ends up in the United States through webshops anyway. And Habanos is catering to that market, by making Cuban cigars thicker and thicker as that’s where the demand from the United States is. Small rings suffer the consequences of that trend.


As for this particular cigar, it comes from the collection of a serious collector of Cuban cigars in Greece. The cigars have been aged for 16 years in the box, which led to the cigar being box-pressed. But not a factory box-press, a natural box-press.


The Colorado Maduro wrapper looks great. Beautiful color, nice shine. On the side of the cigar are a few veins. The Bolivar ring is the classic one. The portrait of Simon Bolivar on a yellow background. But honestly, if Simon Bolivar saw the way he was portrayed, the artist would probably be killed on the spot as it’s not a flattering painting. The triple cap is nice and the cigar feels well packed. No hard spots, no soft spots even though the cigars come from some troublesome years when the Cuban industry had a lot of issues with the construction of cigars. That came through an influx of new rollers and declining quality control. The aroma is almost gone, there are a mild forest and barnyard smell.


The cold draw is good and has a spicy flavor. Pepper, cinnamon, and toast. Once lit, the flavors are muted. Mild. A little leather with some spices. A faint pepper. But from Bolivar, more is to be expected. A little sweetness shows up underneath the leather. Slowly the pepper gets a little stronger, and some earthiness replaces the leather. The leather doesn’t disappear at all though, and a mild toast flavor is noticeable after a third as well. Halfway the cigar picks up white pepper. The sweetness is getting more pleasant and the flavors seem to pick up a little. There’s even a hint of milk chocolate and some cedarwood.


The draw is fine and the silver-gray ash is nice. The smoke is good, thick, enough volume and white. The cigar is medium-bodied, and overall medium flavored. It started mildly flavored but the flavors progressed to get better and stronger. The smoke time is two hours

Would I buy this cigar again? Nope
number87

Categories: 87, Bolivar (Habanos), Cuban cigars | Tags: , , , , ,

Cohiba Lancero (vintage)

A few months ago a few friends came over to my place to hang out and smoke a few cigars in my mancave. One of them gave me a Cohiba Lancero with at least 15 years of age on them. Now as you know, I’m not the biggest fan of Cubans but I know that the vintage Cubans are a completely different animal. That’s because back then the tobacco got the time to ferment properly, the cigars got time to marry flavors, the soil wasn’t depleted yet and the strain of tobacco was better and stronger. Add that to my love of lanceros and you’ll understand that I was very pleased with his kind and generous gift.

 


In 1963 the blend was rolled for the first time and it became the   personal cigar for Fidel Castro and it was only available in this lancero vitola. It didn’t have a brand name until 1966 when the Cohiba name was chosen and it became the official diplomatic cigar for the Cuban government but in 1984 the brand was released officially and became available worldwide except for America. New lines were added and Cohiba became the flagship of the Cuban cigar industry.

 


This 7.6×38 lancero has a pale, veiny wrapper and it looks a bit crooked. The ring is an old version of the Cohiba ring, no gold, no embossing, no hologram and I bet that if I posted a picture of it in one of the many cigar groups people would scream FAKE. The cigar has a nice triple cap with a small pig tail and it feels evenly packed. I smell a faint hay smell, but there isn’t much aroma to it anymore.

 


I cut the cigar and the cold draw is a bit tight. An elegant cigar deserves an elegant light, so I grabbed me vintage Ronson varaflame instead of desegregate the cigar by using a flaming hot torch. The flavor is a mild lemon with leather, old flavors, without question this is a vintage cigar. After half an inch I taste gingerbread and some sweetness. Halfway I taste pepper too, still with the sweet gingerbread and a vanilla like sweetness.

 


The draw is good, not perfect. The smoke is quite thin though, costing points in the final score. The light gray ash isn’t very firm. The burn is good, pretty straight and slow. This medium bodied and medium flavored cigar is very smooth and balanced, subtle as only a vintage cigar can be. The smoke time is an hour and a half.

Would I buy this cigar again? I would love to smoke more, the low score mainly has to do with looks and smoke. Flavors were great. I nubbed it.

Score: 89
number89

Categories: 89, Cohiba (Habanos), Cuban cigars, El Laguito | Tags: , , , ,

Cigarguideblog Top 25 cigars of 2017

On January first of 2017 I switched from the rating system I had been using for 10 years to a 100 point scoring system for three main reasons:

– I could compare scores for myself
– The companies I reviewed cigars from could use the scores to promote their cigars, and that would make my number of visitors grow too
– I could make a top 25 at the end of the year.

The old system I’d been using for so long came from an old (I think it was Hungarian) website, an online humidor, that is no longer online and now that I’ve been using a 100 point score system for a year I no longer want to go back to my old system. How I come to my 100 point score is explained here (insert link)

The last few years I also updated my blog very irregularly due to my work, as part of the industry and the strict Dutch laws it could be considered advertising and I didn’t want to take any risk, even though my reviews are in English and I reviewed a lot of cigars that I didn’t represented. I just did a few reviews to keep the site alive but since parting ways with my then employer in June of 2016 I did a weekly review until the end of the year. To make a new start on the blog I decided to change a few things, like the set up of the review to make it a bit more personal, the 100 point score and a review every Wednesday and Sunday. As a lancero lover I also decided to write a lancero review every 15th of the month, even if the 15th wasn’t a Wednesday or Sunday and to top it off I also wrote a few special reviews on special dates or a series of reviews.

Out of the 156 cigars I reviewed, here’s my top 25 cigars of 2017:

1) Jas Sum Kral Kralot Pre-release Toro (Nicaragua) with a score of 95
2) Balmoral Anejo XO FT127 Lancero (Dominican Republic) with a score of 95
3) Jas Sum Kral Red Knight Toro (Nicaragua) with a score of 95
4) Warped Little Havana Toro (USA) with a score of 95
5) Undercrown Manifesto (Nicaragua) with a score of 94
6) Oliva Masterblend 1 Churchill (Nicaragua) with a score of 94
6) Don Fernando Corona (Nicaragua) with a score of 94
8) Kilo Toro (Nicaragua) with a score of 94
9) Oliva Masterblend 2 Robusto (Nicaragua) with a score of 94
10) Cornelius & Anthony Cornelius Toro (USA) with a score of 94
11) Jas Sum Kral Da Cebak A (Nicaragua) with a score of 94
11) Mi Querida Churchill (Nicaragua) with a score of 94
11) My Father 911 Commemorate Robusto (Nicaragua) with a score of 94
14) La Sagrada Familia Robusto (Nicaragua) with a score of 94
14) Ilja VIII A by My Father (Nicaragua) with a score of 94
14) 601 La Bomba Napalm (Nicaragua) with a score of 94
17) Alec Bradley Tempus Nicaragua Robusto (Honduras) with a score of 93
17) Joya Red Half Corona (Nicaragua) with a score of 93
19) Tatuaje RC233 Figurado (USA) with a score of 93
20) Plasencia Alma Fuerte Figurado (Nicaragua) with a score of 93
21) Oliva Classic Natural Churchill (Nicaragua) with a score of 93
22) RomaCraft Wunderlust Robusto (Nicaragua) with a score of 93
23) Viking Viking Robusto (Dominican Republic) with a score of 93
23) Viking Nordic Warrior Churchill (Dominican Republic) with a score of 93
25) Jas Sum Kral CRNA NOK Toro (Nicaragua) with a score of 93
25) Puros de Hostos Commendador Lancero (Dominican Republic) with a score of 93
25) Long Live the King my style is jalapeño Lancero (Dominican Republic) with a score of 93

Now you might think “hey, that’s 27 cigars” and you’re right but the Jas Sum Kral CRNA Nok, the Puros de Hostos Commendador and the Long Live the King scored exactly the same rating on my 1000 point system so they share the 25th spot, just like the Oliva Masterblend 1 and the Don Fernando share the 6th spot, the Jas Sum Kral Da Cebak, Mi Querida and the My Father 911 commemorate cigar share spot 11, La Sagrada Familia, Ilja VIII and 601 share spot 14, Alec Bradley Tempus Nicaragua and Joya Red share spot 17 and both Viking cigars share the 23rd spot brotherly. Maybe for the next year I need to come up with a divider, if you have suggestions, please let me know.

The breakdown

So I scored 156 cigars in 2017 and the average score is 88,6 so 89 but to end up in the top 25 you had to score at least 92,8 and the average of the top 25 is 93.7

Now looking at the countries, Nicaragua rules the top 27 with 19 entries, the Dominican Republic scores 5, then a surprising number three with 2 entries from the USA and 1 Honduran cigar. That means no Cuban, Costa Rican, Panamanian, Mexican, Peruvian and Dutch cigars made the cut.

Cigars smoked: 156
Highest score: 95
Lowest score: 73
Average score: 89

Now broken down per country:
Flag USA
America:
Cigars smoked: 5
Highest score: 95
Lowest score: 73
Average score: 89

 

flag costa rica
Costa Rica:
Cigars smoked: 3
Highest score: 91
Lowest score: 90
Average score: 90

flag cuba
Cuba:
Cigars smoked: 12
Highest score: 92
Lowest score: 84
Average score: 88

flag dominican
Dominican Republic:
Cigars smoked: 38
Highest score: 95
Lowest score: 72
Average score: 82

 

Flag honduras
Honduras:
Cigars smoked: 15
Highest score: 93
Lowest score: 79
Average score: 90

 

Flag Mexico
Mexico:
Cigars smoked: 7
Highest score: 86
Lowest score: 73
Average score: 90

 

flag nicaragua
Nicaragua:
Cigars smoked: 73
Highest score: 95
Lowest score: 77
Average score: 91

 

flag netherlands
Netherlands:
Cigars smoked: 1
Highest score: 89
Lowest score: 89
Average score: 89

 

flag panama
Panama:
Cigars smoked: 1
Highest score: 89
Lowest score: 89
Average score: 89

 

flag peru
Peru:
Cigars smoked: 1
Highest score: 82
Lowest score: 82
Average score: 82

Now what do these numbers say? It is too simple to say that the average per country is which country I like best because I haven’t smoked an equal amount of cigars per country. But it is safe to say that my preferences are more met by Nicaraguan and Honduran cigars then by any other country.

If you look at the average scores between the Dominican Republic and Cuba you might say I prefer Cuba over the Dominican but I reviewed a lot of Dominican budget cigars and only premium cigars from Cuba so if I cut those budget cigars out, the average of the Dominican Republic shoots back to 90, all those budget cigars definitely effected the average for the Dominican Republic.

Categories: Misc | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

La Gloria Cubana Medaille d’or No.3

When I started smoking cigars I was a fat guy, 400lbs/180kg, and I liked big cigars, robusto or thicker and refused to smoke thin cigars as I didn’t have the skills to truly enjoy them yet and because of the way it looked, I had a bowling ball shaped face and a thin cigar just looked strange I thought. But the owner of the shop that I frequented all the time, Marjolein Hartman from Hartman Cigars & More in Amsterdam, kept saying I needed to try this Cuban slim panetela, the La Gloria Cubana Medaille d’or #3. I said no a few times but because I trusted her judgement and knowledge I finally bought one and lit it. That cigar was a game changer for me, so flavorful, so dynamic and thats when I fell in love with thin cigars. I smoked the cigar in the shop and brought the box home, the box date was June 2002. This review is the last cigar I had left from that specific box.


Now back the bigger vs smaller ring cigars. I keep hearing that the popularity of big ring gauge cigars is because people get more tobacco for their money but I disagree. At Intertabac 2016 I had an interesting conversation with Steve Saka as he disagrees too but we both have a slightly different reason. Steve says its because most of the modern cigars aren’t mild to medium but medium plus to full bodied the bigger ring gauges, that tend to be milder compared to the thinner cigars, are more popular because they are milder and thats still a major part of the consumer base. I say its because a thicker cigar is easier to smoke, the burning temperature is lower so the cigar won’t overheat and won’t turn bitter (exactly the same reason why I always direct novice smokers to a robusto or thicker). On the other hand, why do other people love thin cigars so much? Because the wrapper to filler ratio is much better, wrapper gives the most flavor to a cigar, up to 80% sometimes, and if you have less filler you taste more of the wrapper plus the cigar gets way more dynamic, more evolution but you have to smoke slowly to prevent the cigar from overheating. It takes experience and skill to truly enjoy a thin cigar.


Now the cigar itself, as I said, it is a thin cigar, thinner than my beloved lonsdales and lanceros, much thinner with a ring gauge of 28 while a lancero has a ring gauge of 38. If you don’t know how to measure that, it is measured in 1/64 of an inch, so this cigar is 28/64 of an inch wide which is less than 2/3rd of my pink and I have slim fingers. The length is Lancero size though, close to 7 inch. The wrapper has a bit of a rustic look to it, get the band of, leave it on the grounds in the woods and you might even think it belongs there due to the veins, but I guess thats part of the charm too. The wrapper is mild oily and chocolate milk colored. The cigar feels evenly packed, well constructed and its very hard to roll a cigar this skinny and to apply a triple cap. The ring is cute, a yellow circle with the portrait of a woman in a red cape, black letters La Gloria Cuban with a relatively big golden ring around it with at the bottom black letters Habana. The sides have the golden lining too with a red and white striped pattern and two golden medals on each side. Not a spectacular ring, but the tiny size makes it very cute. The aroma is quite mild and I smell a soapy flavor, some pepper and a little bit of a barnyard.


Due to the skinny size it is impossible to punch the cigar so I grabbed my Xikar cutter to find a tight draw that has a little pepper. I lit the cigar with my soft flame and straight from the start I taste a beautiful mix of leather, coffee and a mild chocolate. After a centimeter I taste mild salty nuts. After a third third I taste some cedar, some bitter herbs and a mild metallic flavors. Halfway I am surprised by the amount of pepper I taste. After two thirds a nutty flavor joins the pepper, I also taste some salt.


Due to the difficult draw the smoke is thin too and not too much either. The ash is quite dark gray, layered and reasonably firm. The burn is straight as a line. There is a lot of evolution, as can be expected from a skinny cigar. The cigar is medium in both body and flavor. The smoke time is an hour and a half.

Would I buy this cigar again? They are discontinued, Habanos is moving more and more into the big ring cigars. And my preferences changed I guess, I’m not liking this as much as I used to and that counts for most Cubans.

Score: 89
89

Categories: 89, Cuban cigars, La Gloria Cubana (Habanos), Partagas Factory | Tags: , , , , , , , ,

Oliva Master Blend 3 Torpedo

After the 2003 release of the Oliva Master Blend 1, the 2005 release of the Master Blend 2 Oliva released a third Master Blend, the Master Blend 3 in 2006. The company did not disclose how many cigars were released but next to the box releases in the robusto, torpedo and Churchill sizes they also released a sampler with those three vitolas and a 5×54 double robusto.


The cigars aren’t tattooed as explained in the Master Blend 2 review which I published yesterday. And in the last 11 years there has been no follow up to the Master Blend series, so we are still waiting for the Master Blend 4. The Master Blend series consisted of 3 vitolas, I smoked the Churchill for the Master Blend 1  review, the robusto for the Master Blend 2 review so lets go for the torpedo for this Master Blend 3 review, then I covered all vitolas and all releases


The sharp head of the cigar is what I notice first, combined with the box pressed with rounded corners it makes the cigar quite unique in shape. The ring is almost identical to the Master Blend 1 and 2, except for a little difference in color and a 3 of course. There is no mention of the number of released cigars though and the tattoo is missing. The construction feels good and the dark wrapper feels a leathery. The cigar has a strong aroma, it smells like walking through the woods early morning after a rainfall, wood, plants and animal droppings.


I cut the cigar. The perfect cold draw is spicy and peppery with sultanas. After lighting it with a soft flame I taste a nice smooth mixture of coffee, honey, cedar, cumin and lime. After an inch I taste cedar, nutmeg, pepper and lime. Halfway the pepper gets stronger with cedar. The final third starts with wood, a little pepper and a little lemon. Near the end I taste coffee again.


The draw is fine and the smoke is medium plus thick, medium plus in volume and beautifully white. The ash is dense and white but not too firm. The burn is pretty straight. The cigar is medium plus bodied and full flavored. The smoke time is an hour and a half.

Would I buy this cigar again? It’s a good cigar but I like the 1 and 2 better.

Score: 92
number92

Categories: 92, Nicaraguan cigars, Oliva, Tabacalera Oliva | Tags: , , , , ,

Oliva Master Blend 2 Robusto

I explained the history on the Oliva Master Blend series in the review of the Master Blend 1 Churchill which I posted yesterday so I won’t repeat myself on the limited tobacco story. Where the Master Blend 1 was released in 2003, the Master Blend 2 came out in 2005. Where the Master Blend 1 saw a production of 375,000 cigars the Master Blend 2 is even more limited with 120,000 cigars, 2,000 boxes of each size.


Now I have a bundle of the private stock of the Oliva family, those are not tattooed but I also had a commercial released one with the tattoo. The tattoo is beautiful but Oliva stopped with tattooing the cigars because it caused at least a 10% damage rate in perfectly good cigars, costing a lot of money and wasting a lot of good tobacco.


The first difference I notice is the ring, its almost identical except it has a 2 right above the half circle cut out and the total production is on the side instead the back. The wrapper is more rustic, thick with veins and discolorations but the tattoo makes up for it. The construction is flawless, again the box pressed with rounded corners like in the Master Blend 1 review and a well placed cap. The aroma is strong, cocoa mixed with hay and straw, very nice.


I punched the cigar. The raisin flavored cold draw is fine. I lit this vintage cigar with a vintage lighter, soft flame. I taste coffee with sugar and lemon, the aftertaste is red pepper. After half an inch I taste earth with a little lemon and a faint of chocolate accompanied by a peppery aftertaste. After a third I taste earth with a little nutmeg, lime, salt and pepper. The flavors change to cedar, soil, chocolate, salt and pepper. The final third starts nutty with salt and a nice dose of pepper in the aftertaste. The pepper slowly grows and I taste a hint of mint too.


I found that the draw was close to perfect. The ash is light gray with thick layers. The ash is firm too. The smoke is medium thick, I would have liked a little more of it though. The burn is beautiful. The cigar has a slow but steady evolution, its complex and medium bodied while being medium full flavored. The smoke time is an hour and forty five minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? I wish!

Score: 94
number94

Categories: 94, Nicaraguan cigars, Oliva, Tabacalera Oliva | Tags: , , , ,

Oliva Master Blend 1 Churchill

Tobacco growing companies often experiment with tobacco, new crops, hybrid tobaccos etcetera and sometimes with fantastic tobacco as a result but those tobaccos aren’t always suitable for further exploitation maybe because of a low yield or that they are prone to disease. Oliva is one of the companies that both grows and makes cigars and in 2000 they had crop of experimental tobacco. They decided to put a Habano wrapper around it and called it “Master Blend 1”, with a total limited production of 5,000 boxes in three sizes (robusto, torpedo and Churchill), so 15,000 in total and released it in 2003.


Now these cigars are nowhere to be found anymore but I have a friend at the factory and when she came over for a trip to Amsterdam I offered her my guest bedroom which she gladly accepted. As a gift she brought me a bundle of Master Blend 1 Churchills, Master Blend 2 Robusto and Special S Perfecto. She knew I wanted the Master Blends, I begged her for those both of the times I visited the factory in Esteli, Nicaragua. Now the Master Blend 1 and 2 that were commercially released have a tattoo on the wrapper but the ones I got don’t have the tattoo, they were rolled and stored for personal use of the Oliva family.


The cigar has a nice colored habano wrapper, medium dark, silky with one vein but its been pressed before rolling so it doesn’t destroy the look of the cigar. The ring is gorgeous, burgundy red with golden details and letters, a green picture of tobacco fields and at the back is says the total production of 375,000 cigars. At the bottom of the ring there is a half circle cut out for the tattoo, that is missing on my specimen but I explained why. I love the shape of the cigar, its box pressed but with rounded edges, therefore it falls in between what you would expect with a box pressed cigar and a regular cigar shape. The construction feels great too, a bit hard but evenly packed with a nice placed cap. The smell is still strong after all these years and is a strong barnyard aroma.


I punched the cigar and the draw is a little tight, so I might have to cut it later. I taste hay and raisin. I lit the cigar with my soft flame. After lighting I taste raisin and floral flavors with a little pepper. After and inch I taste floral flavors with nutmeg, toast and white pepper. I also taste some walnut. Halfway I taste nuts, some chocolate, some mild pepper, cedar. The age took care of any harshness, this cigar is so smooth without becoming dull. The final third is a smooth nut with a little bit of white pepper and a hint of nutmeg. The pepper slowly gets a little stronger.


The draw is good, better than the cold draw. The ash is white, dense and firm. The smoke is thick, white and full in volume. The burn is straight. The cigar is smooth, complex and if I had smoked this blind I would have known that it is a vintage cigar. I would call it medium bodied and medium to medium full flavored but very smooth. The smoking time is two hours and fifteen minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? I wish. Maybe I can bribe my friend at the factory with some stroopwafels.

Score: 94
number94

Categories: 94, Nicaraguan cigars, Oliva, Tabacalera Oliva | Tags: , , , ,

Romeo y Julieta No.2 Tubo

I started to smoke in december 2005 on a vacation to Asia. One of my closest friends is married to an Indonesian woman, they were going to Indonesia and Philip asked me to come along so he didn’t have to spend 4 weeks at his inlaws. So on december 14th we jumped on a plane to Singapore, spend 3 days in that beautiful city (where 11 years later I would get married to my Singaporean wife, but thats a whole other story) and before we got on the plane to Jakarta we bought a bottle of good whisky and a handful of Premium Cigars. Cohiba, Montecristo and Romeo y Julieta. In Indonesia we would smoke a cigar every night with a glass of that whisky and I loved it so I decided to keep smoking cigars once I got back to The Netherlands. On the flight back I maxed out my creditcard at the cigar shop at Changi Airport on singles to have a wide variety and back in The Netherlands I started to sample. The cigar that really sparked my interest in the world of premium cigars was the Guantanamera Cristales, that might sound weird but I’ll explain. That cigar was so horrible that I realized that there is a lot off difference between cigars, that a cigar is not just a bunch of rolled up tobacco and I wanted to learn more.

 


I joined a Dutch board which I later owned and turned into the #1 source for premium cigars, news, reviews in Dutch until I had to give it away due to Dutch laws since I started to work in the industry and it would be considered advertising.  But that’s a side step, when I was new on that board someone joined and he bought a bankrupt cigar shop but he bought it so he could sell the cigarettes in his supermarket and he needed to unload the cigars cheap. I got a few boxes from that sale like a box of Partagas deluxe tubes and a few boxes of Romeo y Julieta No.2 tubos with a box date of december 2006 and I will be smoking one of those cigars now for a review.

 


The cigars are probably one of the first batches with the ‘new’ designed tubes, instead of the aluminum colored tubes that Habanos used before these tubes are white with a red cap, the Romeo y Julieta band printed on the tube as well as the name and the type ‘romeo no.2’. I twist off the cap and I find a medium brown, think milk chocolate, wrapper with a thin yet high veins but also here and there a sparkle of the minerals that the wrapper contains. The construction feels great and the cap is nicely finished. The ring is small and red with a white outline, golden decorations and white lettering saying romeo y julieta habana and in the centre rodriguez aguelles y Co. The cigar has a nice, quite strong, deep and dark soil and manure aroma.

 


I cut the cigar and find a little tight draw with a fresh but peppery hay flavor. I used a soft flame to light the cigar and straight on i taste coffee with a little freshness. After a few puffs the flavors change to a more leather flavor with a hint of chocolate. After a third it’s a mix of leather, wood and something metallic. In the aftertaste I taste a faint chocolate. After two thirds I taste leather, some nuttiness and pepper, and the pepper slowly gets stronger.

 


The smoke is medium thick and medium in volume but beautifully white. The draw is just a little tight and I really mean a little. The ash is gray with dark smears but firm. The burn is great. The cigar is medium bodied, medium full flavored but lacks evolution. The smoke time is an hour and fifteen minutes.

Would I buy this cigar again? I still have over half a box left, so for now I won’t but its a decent cigar after 10 years of aging but the lack of evolution and the less than perfect draw play a big part in the score.

Score: 87

87

Categories: 87, Cuban cigars, Romeo y Julieta (Habanos), Romeo y Julieta Factory | Tags: , , , , , ,

Create a free website or blog at WordPress.com.